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Old 13-08-2017, 08:29 AM   #31
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Think forgot to add... many 'FT' lives.
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:31 AM   #32
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Thank u Lee hsien loong,if our lives consist of carrying huge boulders on our backs and whipping us,u have improved many lives indeed.
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:43 AM   #33
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:44 AM   #34
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Wife gamble with our coffin money. Husband gamble with our future. Both equally suck at gambling. Really is 天生一對龍鳳呸。
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:45 AM   #35
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means his bonus gonna increase
huat ah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:48 AM   #36
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The last erection result says it all
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:50 AM   #37
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ownself declare policies working.
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:52 AM   #38
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Growing number of young Singaporeans in need, relying on Government handouts

Growing number of young Singaporeans in need, relying on Government handouts

Growing number of them relying on handouts - accounting for one in five recipients of ComCare; rise of gig economy may worsen situation

http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/young-and-in-need

Three months ago, Ms Chloe Lin (not her real name) splurged on a big-ticket item. It was her daughter's 11th birthday.

Ms Lin, 33, bought a mango vanilla cake decorated with characters from the movie Frozen. It cost her $50 - one-seventh of the $360 she got a month from ComCare, Singapore's social aid scheme for the poor and needy.

But for Ms Lin, it was worth it. "It's her favourite cartoon and flavour," she said simply.

Having dropped out of school in Secondary 2, Ms Lin struggles to hold on to a job. Her longest stint was as a property telemarketer from 2010 to 2013, earning $7 an hour. But when the sector slowed, she was let go. Twice divorced, she now lives in a one-room rental flat in Ang Mo Kio with her daughter.

Last year, Ms Lin applied for and received ComCare help. For nine months, the monthly stipend was all the pair had to live on.



Ms Lin is among a growing number of young Singaporeans who are in need and having to rely on the Government for handouts.

Ministry of Social and Family Development (MSF) data shows that 5,644 young households - with applicants aged below 35, the official definition of youth - received ComCare's short- to medium-term financial aid in the financial year of 2015.

This is a 40 per cent jump from the 4,016 young households who got such ComCare aid in 2012 - the earliest year that age-segregated data was made public. By contrast, the number of older households whose applicants are aged 35 to 59 went up less - by 34.9 per cent.

Over the years, the Government has become more generous in administering ComCare, bumping up cases. Families now get help when they have a monthly household income of $1,900 or less, or a per capita income of under $650, among other criteria.

But what experts say is troubling is that young Singaporeans account for one in five recipients - a proportion that has not budged despite government efforts such as student care and skills-upgrading subsidies.

It is also just a shade under the share that older Singaporeans aged 60 and above form (these do not include those who get long-term help due to illnesses or disabilities).

The numbers also surprised Ms Rachel Lee, a principal social worker at Fei Yue Family Service Centre. The social worker has seen more younger families seeking help at the centre, but was taken aback when told that the proportion is similar to those 60 and older.

"They may not be the majority but if we don't help these young families break out of the vicious circle, they can get trapped in it, especially those with dependants," she said.

Another set of data also suggests that the problem of poverty among young Singaporeans can be quite intractable. More so than other age groups, they seem more stubbornly stuck with low wages.

Manpower Ministry data shows that last year, there were fewer employed residents aged 15 and above earning a gross monthly income of $1,000 and less, compared to 2015. However, those aged 25 to 34 registered the smallest percentage point drop, meaning that younger workers are slower in breaking out of this low-income bracket compared to other age groups.

There are 41,500 people aged between 15 and 34 who earn under $1,000 a month as of last June.

There are two reasons why some young Singaporeans are in difficulties, say those interviewed.

One is that some struggle to move out of the poverty trap - they are either born into poverty and remain mired in it, or are stuck in jobs that just do not pay enough.

Mr Muhd Alfian K., 30, who has O-level qualifications, is one of them. A crane operator, his life revolves around hitting a target of loading and unloading at least 52 containers within a 12-hour shift. His salary will then be bumped up to $2,000.

This translates into a take-home pay of $1,600 for his family of five.

His wife Irah Nurshahrani, 26, tried to help by taking on jobs such as a hotel housekeeper and a petrol station cashier. But she has had to move from job to job after taking too many days off to care for their children, aged one, two and three. "He works long hours and I try to get work too but it is hard and the money is not enough."

They received $100 in ComCare help for three months last year.

Two, more young Singaporeans are poor because more are now unemployed.

The jobless rate for those below 30 years old has risen over the years and was at 5 per cent last year, double that of other age groups.

An MSF spokesman explained why the young seek assistance: "Some are unable to secure employment due to caregiving needs for young dependants and may require financial assistance in the interim. There are others who might be facing family issues such as divorce, incarceration or violence and require assistance while their family stabilises as they are unable to work."

Looking into the future, the picture is muddied by the rise of the gig economy, displacing traditional jobs. For now, some young workers - tech-savvy and physically fit - are riding the wave and seeing their incomes rise. But their long-term financial health is far from certain.

The authorities worry about the 200,000 gig economy workers here because many lack statutory protections and benefits, including CPF contributions. Deputy Prime Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam said last year that they face risks such as wage instability and not having enough for retirement.

Warned labour economist Hui Weng Tat: "The gig economy is going to aggravate the social and job-related causes of poverty. Retrenchment due to job obsolescence and job disappearance will increase."

So what is to be done?

Ensure they remain employed, and help them remain employable, said labour economist Randolph Tan, a Nominated MP. Measures such as job placement help and re-skilling need to be significantly stepped up, said Singapore Management University's law don Eugene Tan.

To better help those already in a rut, some social workers will soon be trained to help low-income families better manage their finances.

Meanwhile, those in the gig economy should get a hand to build up their CPF savings, such as incentives for voluntary top-up, say some such as Dr Tan Wu Meng, an MP for Jurong GRC .

Above all, experts and social workers said there should be urgency in tackling the issues faced by Singapore's young and working poor. Otherwise, warned Prof Randolph Tan: "We could see the beginnings of a social catastrophe."
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:53 AM   #39
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More Singaporeans receiving social assistance: MSF

More Singaporeans receiving social assistance: MSF

A total of S$116 million was given out in financial assistance under the ComCare programme in FY2014, an increase of 10 per cent from the previous financial year, says the Ministry of Social and Family Development.

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/...ce-msf-8223656

SINGAPORE: More needy Singaporeans applied for and received social assistance from the Government in FY2014, said the Ministry of Social and Family Development on Thursday (Dec 17).

Needy Singaporeans received about S$116 million of financial help between Apr 1, 2014 and Mar 31, 2015 from ComCare, the Government’s social assistance scheme, said MSF. This was an increase of 10 per cent from the previous financial year.

Those Channel NewsAsia spoke to said it had to do with greater outreach. There are now 24 social service offices across Singapore, with one in every major HDB town. This means more accessible help to those who need it most. More families and individuals are also now eligible for ComCare as the Government seeks to expand its social safety net.

ComCare offers various schemes for needy families and individuals, including vouchers and subsidies to support education and living expenses, as well as employment assistance.

More people applied for short-to-medium term assistance over the past three financial years, said MSF. The figure went up 13 per cent in FY2014 to 27,500. The numbers have also been increasing over the past three financial years.

The percentage of households living in one- and two-room flats receiving such help increased from 43.5 per cent in FY2012 to 46.8 per cent in FY2014. In addition, 55.8 per cent of one- to two-persons households received short-to-medium term help in FY2014, up from 51.4 per cent in FY2012.

More than half of the applicants for short-to-medium term help were married and in their 40s and 50s, and 64.6 per cent of them had below GCE N- or O-Level education. Among the applicants, only 26.2 per cent of them were employed.

The short-to-medium term assistance scheme is for needy households who are temporarily unable to work due to illness or having to care for dependents. Under the scheme, the households can receive vouchers for expenses such as transport and rent, a monthly cash grant, medical assistance and help in job search or training.

Observers said the numbers point to the increasing economic vulnerability of low-income households.

"Although economic disparity has improved somewhat over the past two years, we are still not past the problems of high income inequality, bottom wage stagnation, high costs of living and fast pace of growth. That makes it harder for the less able to catch up," said Associate Professor Irene Ng from the National University of Singapore.

Added Mr Seah Kian Peng, chairman of the Government Parliamentary Committee for social and family development: "The other dimensions kick in. One of them os cost of living, which will never go away, and therefore the job of any Government is to keep cost of living affordable, at the same time also making sure wages, particularly the low income group, go above inflation."

Social and Family Development Minister Tan Chuan-Jin wrote in a blogpost that the help must be holistic. For example helping individuals upgrade their skills for better wages or strengthening Workfare and the Progressive Wage Model further.

Among those receiving long-term assistance, nearly two-thirds were single and aged 65 and above. The majority – 67.9 per cent – of them lived in one- and two-room HDB flats, MSF said.

The long-term scheme is mainly for needy Singaporeans who are unable to work due to old age or illness. Under the scheme, the needy can receive cash assistance for their daily expenses and their children will be able to get help with schooling expenses.

ComCare, introduced in 2005, is funded by the ComCare Endowment Fund, which currently stands at about S$1.7 billion.

On how the social assistance scheme can evolve, Mr Seah said that "it has to take account the changing demographics".

"What are the challenges that families will have to face going forward?" he said. "The fact that we are ageing very rapidly, the fact that we have fewer people to support families, I think will be a cause for concern. But we have to tackle this head-on. The issues that we face are multi-dimensional.

"Unfortunately the outlook certainly for the next one year is going to be quite uncertain. So we will face the prospect of a slowing economy with probably a higher rate of unemployment."

Assoc Professor Ng added that ComCare will likely expand beyond financial assistance to become social assistance, where low-income families are also supported through social, health and other personal issues.
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:54 AM   #40
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Growing number of young Singaporeans in need, relying on Government handouts

Growing number of them relying on handouts - accounting for one in five recipients of ComCare; rise of gig economy may worsen situation

http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/young-and-in-need

Three months ago, Ms Chloe Lin (not her real name) splurged on a big-ticket item. It was her daughter's 11th birthday.

Ms Lin, 33, bought a mango vanilla cake decorated with characters from the movie Frozen. It cost her $50 - one-seventh of the $360 she got a month from ComCare, Singapore's social aid scheme for the poor and needy.

But for Ms Lin, it was worth it. "It's her favourite cartoon and flavour," she said simply.

Having dropped out of school in Secondary 2, Ms Lin struggles to hold on to a job. Her longest stint was as a property telemarketer from 2010 to 2013, earning $7 an hour. But when the sector slowed, she was let go. Twice divorced, she now lives in a one-room rental flat in Ang Mo Kio with her daughter.

Last year, Ms Lin applied for and received ComCare help. For nine months, the monthly stipend was all the pair had to live on.



Ms Lin is among a growing number of young Singaporeans who are in need and having to rely on the Government for handouts.

Ministry of Social and Family Development (MSF) data shows that 5,644 young households - with applicants aged below 35, the official definition of youth - received ComCare's short- to medium-term financial aid in the financial year of 2015.

This is a 40 per cent jump from the 4,016 young households who got such ComCare aid in 2012 - the earliest year that age-segregated data was made public. By contrast, the number of older households whose applicants are aged 35 to 59 went up less - by 34.9 per cent.

Over the years, the Government has become more generous in administering ComCare, bumping up cases. Families now get help when they have a monthly household income of $1,900 or less, or a per capita income of under $650, among other criteria.

But what experts say is troubling is that young Singaporeans account for one in five recipients - a proportion that has not budged despite government efforts such as student care and skills-upgrading subsidies.

It is also just a shade under the share that older Singaporeans aged 60 and above form (these do not include those who get long-term help due to illnesses or disabilities).

The numbers also surprised Ms Rachel Lee, a principal social worker at Fei Yue Family Service Centre. The social worker has seen more younger families seeking help at the centre, but was taken aback when told that the proportion is similar to those 60 and older.

"They may not be the majority but if we don't help these young families break out of the vicious circle, they can get trapped in it, especially those with dependants," she said.

Another set of data also suggests that the problem of poverty among young Singaporeans can be quite intractable. More so than other age groups, they seem more stubbornly stuck with low wages.

Manpower Ministry data shows that last year, there were fewer employed residents aged 15 and above earning a gross monthly income of $1,000 and less, compared to 2015. However, those aged 25 to 34 registered the smallest percentage point drop, meaning that younger workers are slower in breaking out of this low-income bracket compared to other age groups.

There are 41,500 people aged between 15 and 34 who earn under $1,000 a month as of last June.

There are two reasons why some young Singaporeans are in difficulties, say those interviewed.

One is that some struggle to move out of the poverty trap - they are either born into poverty and remain mired in it, or are stuck in jobs that just do not pay enough.

Mr Muhd Alfian K., 30, who has O-level qualifications, is one of them. A crane operator, his life revolves around hitting a target of loading and unloading at least 52 containers within a 12-hour shift. His salary will then be bumped up to $2,000.

This translates into a take-home pay of $1,600 for his family of five.

His wife Irah Nurshahrani, 26, tried to help by taking on jobs such as a hotel housekeeper and a petrol station cashier. But she has had to move from job to job after taking too many days off to care for their children, aged one, two and three. "He works long hours and I try to get work too but it is hard and the money is not enough."

They received $100 in ComCare help for three months last year.

Two, more young Singaporeans are poor because more are now unemployed.

The jobless rate for those below 30 years old has risen over the years and was at 5 per cent last year, double that of other age groups.

An MSF spokesman explained why the young seek assistance: "Some are unable to secure employment due to caregiving needs for young dependants and may require financial assistance in the interim. There are others who might be facing family issues such as divorce, incarceration or violence and require assistance while their family stabilises as they are unable to work."

Looking into the future, the picture is muddied by the rise of the gig economy, displacing traditional jobs. For now, some young workers - tech-savvy and physically fit - are riding the wave and seeing their incomes rise. But their long-term financial health is far from certain.

The authorities worry about the 200,000 gig economy workers here because many lack statutory protections and benefits, including CPF contributions. Deputy Prime Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam said last year that they face risks such as wage instability and not having enough for retirement.

Warned labour economist Hui Weng Tat: "The gig economy is going to aggravate the social and job-related causes of poverty. Retrenchment due to job obsolescence and job disappearance will increase."

So what is to be done?

Ensure they remain employed, and help them remain employable, said labour economist Randolph Tan, a Nominated MP. Measures such as job placement help and re-skilling need to be significantly stepped up, said Singapore Management University's law don Eugene Tan.

To better help those already in a rut, some social workers will soon be trained to help low-income families better manage their finances.

Meanwhile, those in the gig economy should get a hand to build up their CPF savings, such as incentives for voluntary top-up, say some such as Dr Tan Wu Meng, an MP for Jurong GRC .

Above all, experts and social workers said there should be urgency in tackling the issues faced by Singapore's young and working poor. Otherwise, warned Prof Randolph Tan: "We could see the beginnings of a social catastrophe."
wow....

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Old 13-08-2017, 08:55 AM   #41
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Job market still weak despite stronger economic growth

Job market still weak despite stronger economic growth

http://www.straitstimes.com/business...conomic-growth

SINGAPORE - Singapore has been reporting more cheerful economic growth numbers this year but this pick-up is not translating into a stronger labour market.

Economists and government officials say the employment outlook is expected to remain lacklustre as growth has been uneven across sectors.

The Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) on Friday (Aug 11) narrowed up its forecast for economic growth this year to 2 to 3 per cent, from an earlier estimate of 1 to 3 per cent.

It announced this alongside the release of the latest Economic Survey of Singapore, which showed the economy expanded 2.9 per cent in the April to June quarter compared with the same period a year earlier. This was faster than the 2.5 per cent growth in the preceding quarter and also an upward revision from an earlier estimate of 2.5 per cent.

In contrast to these stronger figures, the labour market has been faring less well.

Total employment fell for the second quarter in a row in the April to June period, with 8,400 fewer workers - not including foreign domestic workers - in jobs, according to Manpower Ministry (MOM) data out last month.

The overall unemployment rate remained at 2.2 per cent, unchanged from the first quarter.

But the rates were still elevated, the ministry said, being 0.1 to 0.2 percentage points higher than a year ago.

The manufacturing sector saw employment fall for the 11th consecutive quarter, by 2,500. In construction, employment fell for the fourth straight quarter by 9,500, while the service sector added 3,400 workers, excluding maids.

In a research report released last month, Bank of America Merrill Lynch economist Mohamed Faiz Nagutha said Singapore's labour market has remained weak "for the simple reason that the recovery has not been strong or broad enough".

This "jobless recovery" is chiefly due to the manufacturing sector, which has shed workers for 11 straight quarters even though pick-up in demand for Singapore's exports has helped boost factory output growth. The sector, which makes up a fifth of the economy, saw employment fall 2,500 in the second quarter.

Growth in manufacturing has been driven largely by electronics and precision engineering, but the marine and offshore segment remains weak due to low oil prices and has been the main reason behind job losses in the sector, said Mr Terence Ho, the divisional director for manpower planning and policy at MOM, on Friday (Aug 11) at a press conference about the latest quarterly economic numbers.

MTI economics division director Yong Yik Wei added that the construction sector - which has been shrinking on the back of weak private sector building - has also contributed to employment declines.

Mr Faiz noted in his report that "a large part of the blame can be placed on the struggling marine and offshore engineering segment, but employment in the electronics segment has also declined slightly despite the blockbuster ...jump in production."

"Substantial employment gains are unlikely to materialise in the sector given falling investment commitments levels and shift away from production activities," he added, noting that the services sector, while still creating jobs, has been unable to fully absorb the excess labor released from manufacturing as it has seen lacklustre growth since 2015.

MOM's Mr Ho said the employment outlook will likely remain "modest" for this year in line with uneven economic growth.
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:56 AM   #42
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Classic example of another "chui kong lampard song" by our 李阿斗。。。

Ownself say ownself very good, policies all working...He and his ministers all living in a different world compared to us sinkies..
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Old 13-08-2017, 08:58 AM   #43
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Ji pai ho say liao! Year end bonus thick thick.

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Old 13-08-2017, 09:08 AM   #44
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Work ki lan ar
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Old 13-08-2017, 09:17 AM   #45
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CECA has improved the lives of millions of Indian FTs.
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