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Old 12-09-2007, 09:48 PM   #31
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10 tips for better home theater sound

Some tips from CNET:

http://asia.cnet.com/buyingguides/ho...9216559,00.htm
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Old 06-10-2007, 04:08 PM   #32
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Getting started and a bit lost?

Need a place where you can start your journey?

This is a good spot to get started on the HT quest:

http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/in...?topic=48382.0
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Old 20-10-2007, 03:11 PM   #33
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Buying guides?

A nice place to get product ideas:


http://www.avguide.com/buyers-guides
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Old 25-11-2007, 03:56 PM   #34
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Getting a subwoofer is also an art. When you are new, you just dun know what you dun know.

Got a 2nd hand SVS sub recently, read all the rave reviews abt it & it's ability to go as low as 20Hz. Thought i got one of the best subs in the world (i still think so ), the more i listen & read abt ppl's exp with svs subs, i realized that it dun do those mid bass "thumps" (aka chest pounding bass). Luckily, i could connect another digital output from my avr to my previous 30W & 6 1/2" integrated amp subwoofer to give me some kicks, meanwhile thinking of getting another sub.

Now the more you know, the more you want to spend! *Sign*
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Old 27-11-2007, 08:02 AM   #35
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Sound formats

A nice article on the current formats.


http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/sh...Explained/1064
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Old 28-11-2007, 06:08 PM   #36
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*Copy & paste one of my post* Correct me if i'm wrong.

Not so good subwoofers will bottom out or give port noises when trying to output those low frequencies, so it's unpleasant to hear. There are some which simply dun output anything when it reaches it's threshold, so at least you need not put up with those noises. However, if it's good & powerful subwoofer which can output those low frequencies, you'll feel that the air in your room is filled with bass, your window grills, bookshelf glass panels, etc will rattle.

And yes, you do not hear anything that comes out from a subwoofer, you can only feel whatever that comes out from the subwoofer, e.g. chest thumps (*maybe between 30-80Hz) & room shaking (*ard 30Hz & below). For 20Hz & below, maybe they use some kind of meter to measure?

And dun plainly believe those specifications given by manufacturers unless they dare to specify it's +/-3dB or somethin like tat. They may put that it can go down to 25Hz, but in real-life performance, it can only go till 30Hz.
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Old 12-12-2007, 07:50 AM   #37
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A very interesting read on multi-speakers setup base on humans' ability to perceive sound.

http://www.audioholics.com/news/on-l...urround-format.
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Old 14-12-2007, 07:50 AM   #38
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Advice

A gentle tip to newbies asking for advice on components to buy:

- Give Us a Budget! Who can tell what you want to spend

- music preferences - just for games (some simple boom box from Logitech or Creative might suffice) / a full Home theatre system / Stereo listening pleasure / headphones

Plus the ratio of the above

- what is the room size??

- basically the more info offered, the more replies!
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Old 18-12-2007, 07:22 AM   #39
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A good read:


http://forums.highdefdigest.com/showthread.php?t=3860

High Def Audio FAQ

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There have been a lot of questions lately about HD audio... mainly the new codecs, and what equipment is needed to play them. This is a list of the new codecs, and what is required to hear each.

Dolby Digital-Plus:
Dolby ®Digital Plus is the next-generation audio technology for all high-definition programming and media. It combines the efficiency to meet future broadcast demands with the power and flexibility to realize the full audio potential of the upcoming high-definition experience. Built on Dolby Digital, the multichannel audio standard for DVD and HD broadcasts worldwide, Dolby Digital Plus was designed for the delivery formats of the future, but remains fully compatible with all current A/V receivers. With Dolby Digital Plus, you get even higher quality audio, more channels, and greater flexibility. Amaze your ears.

Features
Multichannel sound with discrete channel output.
Channel and program extensions can carry multichannel audio programs of up to 7.1 channels* and support multiple programs in a single encoded bitstream.
Outputs a Dolby Digital bitstream for playback on existing Dolby Digital systems.
Supports data rates as high as 6 Mbps.
Bit rate performance of at least 3 Mbps on HD DVD and up to 1.7 Mbps on Blu-ray Disc.
Accurately reproduces what the director and producer intended.
I
nteractive mixing and streaming capability in advanced systems.
Supported by HDMI™, the new single-cable digital connection for high-definition audio and video.

Benefits
Can deliver 7.1 channels and beyond* of enhanced-quality audio at up to 6 Mbps.
Allows multiple languages to be carried in a single bitstream.
Offers audio professionals new creative power and freedom.
Compatible with the millions of home entertainment systems equipped with Dolby Digital.
No latency or loss of quality in the conversion process.
Maintains high quality at more efficient broadcast bit rates (200 kbps for 5.1-channel audio).
Selected by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) as the standard for future broadcast applications; named as an option by the Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) Project for satellite and cable TV.
Selected as the mandatory audio format for HD DVD and as an optional audio format for the Blu-ray Disc.
Source

Dolby Digital TrueHD:
Dolby® TrueHD is Dolby’s next-generation lossless technology developed for high-definition disc-based media. Dolby TrueHD delivers tantalizing sound that is bit-for-bit identical to the studio master, unlocking the true high-definition entertainment experience on next-generation discs. When coupled with high-definition video, Dolby TrueHD offers an unprecedented home theater experience that lets you enjoy sound as stunning as the high-definition picture.

Features
100 percent lossless coding technology.
Up to 18 Mbps bit rate.
Supports up to eight full-range channels of 24-bit/96 kHz audio.*
Supported by High-Definition Media Interface (HDMI™), the new single-cable digital connection for audio and video.
Supports extensive metadata including dialogue normalization and dynamic range control.
*Dolby TrueHD can support more than eight audio channels. HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc standards currently limit their maximum number of audio channels to eight.

Benefits
Delivers enthralling studio-master-quality sound that unlocks the true high-definition entertainment experience on next-generation discs.
Offers more discrete channels than ever before for impeccable surround sound.
Compatible with the A/V receivers and home-theaters-in-a-box (HTIBs) of today and tomorrow.
Dialogue normalization maintains the same volume level when you change to other Dolby Digital and Dolby TrueHD programming.
Dynamic range control (Night mode) enables you to customize audio playback to reduce peak volume levels (no loud surprises) while experiencing all the details in the soundtrack, enabling late-night viewing of high-energy surround sound without disturbing others.
Selected as the mandatory format for HD DVD and as an optional format for Blu-ray Disc.
Source

Additional information about Dolby Digital in HD

DTS-HD:
DTS-HD High Resolution Audio can deliver up to 7.1 channels of sound that is virtually indistinguishable from the original. DTS-HD High Resolution Audio delivers audio at high constant bit rates superior to standard DVDs---6.0 Mbps on Blu-ray discs and 3.0 Mbps on HD-DVD to produce outstanding sound quality. It is capable of delivering up to 7.1 channels at 96k sampling frequency/24 bit depth resolution. It allows content creators to deliver rich, high definition audio on movies where disc space may not allow for DTS-HD Master Audio.

DTS-HD Master Audio:
DTS-HD Master Audio is capable of delivering audio that is a bit-for-bit identical to the studio master. DTS-HD Master Audio delivers audio at super high variable bit rates -24.5 mega-bits per second (Mbps) on Blu-ray discs and 18.0 Mbps on HD-DVD - that are significantly higher than standard DVDs . This bit stream is so "fast" and the transfer rate is so "high" that it can deliver the Holy Grail of audio: 7.1 audio channels at 96k sampling frequency/24 bit depths that are identical to the original. With DTS-HD Master Audio, you will be able to experience movies and music, exactly as the artist intended: clear, pure, and uncompromised.

Source

Uncompressed LPCM:
Uncompressed PCM 5.1: Found on a large number of Blu-Ray discs but not supported on HD-DVD, uncompressed PCM 5.1 is simply that: an uncompressed version of the film’s standard 5.1 to 7.1 soundtrack. This is exactly what the name says, uncompressed, raw audio.
Source

What do I need to experience HD audio?
There are two ways to receive HD Audio, HDMI and 5.1 or higher analog audio connection.

HDMI will pass up to 7.1 channels of /HD audio fed from HD DVD or Blu-ray disc. There are two advantages to using HDMI: first, it is a digital connection, so the digital data is kept in digital form, and it uses a single cable.

Analog audio (5.1 or higher) will allow the player to feed the audio stream to an equiped receiver as PCM audio data.
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Old 16-02-2008, 01:59 PM   #40
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Choosing a new AV amp

A good read:
http://www.audioholics.com/buying-gu...an-av-receiver

Budgeting for a new HT:
http://www.audioholics.com
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Old 17-02-2008, 04:50 PM   #41
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sub placement is important, you dont wanna end up like me when i loaded my woofer in a corner cos most ppl did that, and cabinets just started vibrating..
neither do you want to leave it in the middle of the room cos ur woofer's gonna sound pretty lame
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Old 11-03-2008, 08:25 AM   #42
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Understanding the Differences between HDMI Versions

http://www.audioholics.com/education...-hdmi-versions

HDMI 1.0
Release date: December 2002

Specs:
Single-cable digital audio/video connection with a maximum bitrate of 4.9Gbps.
Supports up to 165Mpixels/sec video (1080p at 60Hz or UXGA)
8-channels of 192kHz/24-bit audio (PCM)
Abstract: The original HDMI v1.0 spec was and remains sufficient for most purposes. The reason is that it is a solid backwards-compatible format that can , through PCM audio handle all of the high definition audio formats present today. The key is having a player that can decode these native HD audio formats to uncompressed PCM. DSD and DVD-audio cannot be natively sent over HDMI 1.0. What HDMI 1.0 fails to do, is account for additional bandwidth provided by Deep Color (10- 12 and 16-bit color depths). It also does not support the new xvYCC color space.
Practical Issues and tips: Most CableTV set-top boxes use HDMI 1.0. The maximum output for this spec is 1080p at 60Hz with 8-bit color depth. Regardless of any display of higher version of HDMI you may have, the source will always limit the maximum bit-depth potential. An HDMI 1.0 device can still pull 8 channels of uncompressed PCM audio and as is perfectly fine for most users.

HDMI 1.1
Release date: May 2004

Specs:
Added support for DVD Audio
Slight mechanical and electrical spec changes
Abstract: HDMI 1.1 simply added the ability for the system to transmit DVD-Audio signal over the cbale form the player to the receiving device. If both devices are rated to v1.1 then a DVD-Audio signal can be sent and received. Please note that by "DVD-Audio" we mean the high resolution audio format, not the audio present on a typical DVD disc.
Practical Issues and tips: HDMI 1.1 is very common and was the first spec to hit the mass market apart from CableTV set-top boxes. Many AV receivers came out with this spec and are fine for handling DVD-Audio and uncompressed PCM audio.

HDMI 1.2
Release date: August 2005
Specs:

Added DSD (Direct Stream Digital) support, allowing native transmission of Super Audio CD (SACD) content at up to 8 channels
Enabled and acknowledged an HDMI Type A connector for PC-based sources
Permitted PC sources to use native RGB color-space with the optional ability to also support the YCbCr color space for consumer electronics applications
Mandated that HDMI 1.2 and later displays support low-voltage sources such as those found with PCI Express technology (the current display interface standard for PC video cards)
Abstract: HDMI 1.2 was the biggest jump since the introduction of HDMI. It really brought the PC market into focus and was developed and announced so as to compete better with the emerging VESA DisplayPort standard. For those still clinging to their universal DVD players, HDMI v1.2 finally delivered the promise of a true one-cable solution for all current high-definition audio sources.
Practical Issues and tips: If you want to utilize a fully native universal DVD player without converting the SACD to PCM then HDMI 1.2 is required. We've found that if the player does a good job at conversion, however, v1.2 isn't always that important.
HDMI 1.2a
Release date: December 2005

Specs:
Fully specified Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) features, command sets, and compliance tests
Minor changes to CEC (Consumer Electronic Control) spec
Abstract: This incremental change clarified one of the earlier promises of HDMI, Consumer Electronic Control - a feature that promised "smart" interoperability between components. Unfortunately, this wasn't exactly standardized across the board and, as a result, nearly all manufacturers products only interface within their own brands. Of all things, this is the most disappointing failure of HDMI to-date.
Practical Issues and tips: This is a common format for manufacturers using CEC. There is no practical reason to prefer 1.2a over 1.2. If you don't intend to use the native DSD signal from an SACD player via HDMI, v1.1 is just as good as 1.2 or 1.2a.

HDMI 1.3
Release date: June 2006
Specs:

Increased single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps)
Optionally supports 10-bit, 12-bit, and 16-bit "Deep Color" per channel (over one billion colors) up from 8-bit
Allowed the use of xvYCC color space (previously just sRGB or YCbCr)
Incorporated automatic audio "lip" syncing capability
Supported output of native Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio streams for external decoding by AV receivers
Made available a new Type C "mini" connector for devices such as camcorders
Added gamut Metadata transmission capability
Added Reference Cable Equalizer mandate to high frequency displays to recapture degraded copper cable signal
Abstract: To be plain, this update was a complete disaster. First of all, nobody asked for HDMI 1.3, except perhaps the companies behind the new high definition audio formats. Of course TrueHD and DTS-HD, the lossless audio codec formats used on HD DVDs and Blu-ray Discs could be decoded into uncompressed audio by the players. This makes 1.3 irrelevant for audio. What made HDMI 1.3 such as disaster was the increased bandwidth requirements - which hit an already suffering cable market with new requirements for digital signal transmission. Before HDMI 1.3, it was almost impossible to get a non-active copper HDMI cable to pass 1080p at distances greater than 50 feet. After HDMI 1.3, with the addition of Deep Color, that distance shrank to less than 20 feet, causing industry-wide failures on installed cabling systems.

Expensive active solutions started coming on-board to alleviate some of the problems within several months but even today there is a large amount of consumer confusion regarding cable certification and how far a signal will travel over copper cables. The spec also mandated that HDMI 1.3-compliant displays (sinks) which took advantage of high frequency content (Deep Color) must implement built-in cable equalization to help compensate for cable losses through copper cables. Thanks to several companies dedicated to certifying their products for specific distances, this issue is slowly becoming more manageable. The first product on the market with HDMI 1.3 was the PlayStation 3 gaming console.
Practical Issues and tips: HDMI 1.3 is a requirement for Deep Color support or use of the new xvYCC expanded color space. If high definition audio is important to you, you still may not need v1.3 if your player can decode the native HD audio formats into uncompressed PCM audio. This uncompressed audio, up to 8 channels, can be sent over HDMI 1.0.Typically, 24p support coincides with v1.3, however this is nothing more than coincidence of when both format and spec came into popularity.

HDMI 1.3a
Release date: November 2006

Specs:
Cable and Sink modifications for Type C
Source termination recommendation
Removed undershoot and maximum rise/fall time limits.
CEC capacitance limits changed
RGB video quantization range clarification
audio control commands added to CEC and commands for timer control brought back in an altered form
Concurrently released compliance test specification included
Abstract: An incremental change, v1.3a is mostly an adjustment for manufacturers utilizing CEC features as well as those integrating the new Type C connector (seen only in smaller form factor products and quite rare to-date).
Practical Issues and tips: There is no consumer-focused practical difference between HDMI v1.3a and v1.3.
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Old 13-03-2008, 09:22 PM   #43
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Speaker placement

Some images to help you get speaker placement right:
http://www.soundoctor.com/surround.htm






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Old 13-03-2008, 09:23 PM   #44
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Old 18-03-2008, 03:04 PM   #45
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Hi Fi glossary

http://www.hifi-writer.com/he/dictionary.htm

Good place to look up terms
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