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Medishield Comparison. Find out which is the cheapest

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Old 14-09-2017, 10:17 AM   #526
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Anyone knows if the same condition eg cataract can be claimed twice regardless if it's the same policy year.
It's better to check with your agent. I know that everything comes from how the doctor writes. If it's a necessary procedure then there shouldn't be any problem.
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Old 14-09-2017, 10:23 AM   #527
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All you have to do is check the coverage tables. There are differences. How you value those coverage differences is up to you, but clearly there are differences. No two policies are exactly the same. NTUC seems to be on the "lean" side in their coverage provisions, and that goes a long way to explain why their premiums are lower. For the most part you get what you pay for -- and don't get what you don't pay for.
Yup. That's why for those who are worried about high premiums, NTUC is a good choice. Always remember, premiums can change but NTUC has historically be the lowest.

Medishield is a plan that you can't switch as you like if you have a medical history. I suggest people start looking at the premiums charged from age 55 onwards across different companies to judge for themselves.

For most people, it will be hardest to maintain a private class A plan with rider once they retire at around 62. However, there's a trend these days that diseases are affecting younger age groups. There are people in their early 40s that have problem working. I have 1 friend in her early 40s that kena stroke and cannot work anymore.
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Old 15-09-2017, 09:37 AM   #528
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Thanks all for the info.
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Old 15-09-2017, 10:04 AM   #529
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Currently i pay for my mom the ntuc rider for B ward.. around cash $500++ /per yr.
think once she hit certain age, i had to top cash for cpf part.


my salary not high cant pay for higer plan. i had to pay for myself too..

for me i under GE. soon i will downgrade as age go by

Yup. That's why for those who are worried about high premiums, NTUC is a good choice. Always remember, premiums can change but NTUC has historically be the lowest.

Medishield is a plan that you can't switch as you like if you have a medical history. I suggest people start looking at the premiums charged from age 55 onwards across different companies to judge for themselves.

For most people, it will be hardest to maintain a private class A plan with rider once they retire at around 62. However, there's a trend these days that diseases are affecting younger age groups. There are people in their early 40s that have problem working. I have 1 friend in her early 40s that kena stroke and cannot work anymore.

Last edited by harky; 15-09-2017 at 10:18 AM..
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Old 15-09-2017, 01:50 PM   #530
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I'm on Aviva Plan 1 with rider Option A. Have been with them more than 10 years, ever since they're the first offering as charged plans.

Never claim before, so don't know what's the claim experience.

Not sure if I should change... I like their Option A rider.
Any other insurer have rider similar to Aviva Option A? (cover co-insurance only)
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Old 16-09-2017, 12:30 PM   #531
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My laobei planning to go cataract, haven't book appointment, and he got the new shield from ntuc without any rider

For a few question:
1) can he add the rider before his operation?
2) can he remove the rider after operation?
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Old 16-09-2017, 01:08 PM   #532
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My laobei planning to go cataract, haven't book appointment, and he got the new shield from ntuc without any rider

For a few question:
1) can he add the rider before his operation?
2) can he remove the rider after operation?
Don't think so. Need to declare.
If it's canceled but claimed then no prorated refund usually.
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Old 17-09-2017, 11:47 PM   #533
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I'm on Aviva Plan 1 with rider Option A. Have been with them more than 10 years, ever since they're the first offering as charged plans.

Never claim before, so don't know what's the claim experience.

Not sure if I should change... I like their Option A rider.
Any other insurer have rider similar to Aviva Option A? (cover co-insurance only)
I like the option A rider (only cover co-insurance). Premium cheaper, less than 100 per year. This is one of the reason I chose Aviva. I didn't upgrade to add option C (include deductible). When get older, option A is still more affordable than if include the option C.

Last time NTUC has similar rider, don't know now still has this option or not.
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Old 18-09-2017, 12:26 AM   #534
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I like the option A rider (only cover co-insurance). Premium cheaper, less than 100 per year. This is one of the reason I chose Aviva. I didn't upgrade to add option C (include deductible). When get older, option A is still more affordable than if include the option C.

Last time NTUC has similar rider, don't know now still has this option or not.
Ntuc still got. It's called assist rider
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Old 18-09-2017, 07:02 PM   #535
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My laobei planning to go cataract, haven't book appointment, and he got the new shield from ntuc without any rider

For a few question:
1) can he add the rider before his operation?
2) can he remove the rider after operation?
Can help with this
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Old 18-09-2017, 07:38 PM   #536
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1) Yes he can add before his operation
2) Yes he can remove after operation

But the above is not the main point, main point is because if he just added the rider, and he goes for the operation not long after, NTUC will definitely do its own investigation to see if it is an existing condition (Assuming you didnt declare anything), and the claim will still be rejected.

Assuming you declare the condition, the new rider will likely exclude any treatments concerning that particular condition.

My laobei planning to go cataract, haven't book appointment, and he got the new shield from ntuc without any rider

For a few question:
1) can he add the rider before his operation?
2) can he remove the rider after operation?
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Old 18-09-2017, 09:24 PM   #537
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1) Yes he can add before his operation
2) Yes he can remove after operation

But the above is not the main point, main point is because if he just added the rider, and he goes for the operation not long after, NTUC will definitely do its own investigation to see if it is an existing condition (Assuming you didnt declare anything), and the claim will still be rejected.

Assuming you declare the condition, the new rider will likely exclude any treatments concerning that particular condition.
Hi Sir, thanks for the reply.

Do you mean adding a rider also have to declare existing medical condition?
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Old 18-09-2017, 10:33 PM   #538
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Hi Sir, thanks for the reply.

Do you mean adding a rider also have to declare existing medical condition?
Adding a rider is considered an upgrade.
All upgrade needs to be underwritten.
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Old 21-09-2017, 04:56 PM   #539
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any recommendations IP for 2yrs old female kid. understand some have extra cover for different gender, cost, factor that stand out from the rest...
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Old 21-09-2017, 06:22 PM   #540
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any recommendations IP for 2yrs old female kid. understand some have extra cover for different gender, cost, factor that stand out from the rest...
AXA's Shield Plan B looks interesting for her. That's an Integrated Shield plan geared toward public hospital A ward coverage. It's tied with Prudential for the longest pre-/post-hospitalization coverage periods (180/365 days) among public hospital plans, its annual limit is third best ($550,000/year, only beaten by Great Eastern and Prudential), and it has a 1 year waiting period on congenital abnormalities instead of the usual 2. (AIA's HealthShield Gold Max B apparently has no congenital abnormalities waiting period. Preexisting conditions are still excluded. See below for an AIA discussion.)

AXA does set a limit of 45 days for community hospital coverage, and that's less generous than other carriers that don't set such limits.

The premium for this AXA plan is $78/year (above MediShield Life). If you want to add the Basic Care Rider, which eliminates the deductible and co-insurance, add $170/year.

At youth ages there really aren't substantial premium price differences, so my general advice would be to emphasize coverage quality over price.

If you're shopping for a private hospitalization Integrated Shield plan, then I'd take a close look at AIA's HealthShield Gold Max A. If you stick with "AIA Quality Healthcare Partners" (which includes some private hospitals, typically Parkway group, or any public hospitals), then some really high coverage limits kick in. You end up with 13 months pre-/post-hospitalization coverage, the longest limits available in any Integrated Shield plan. There's a $2 million annual limit, also the highest. And their "A Saver" rider is a reasonable one. Plus there's that congenital abnormalities best-in-class provision (zero waiting period, although preexisting conditions are still excluded). The premium for a 3 year old is $155/year, plus $277/year if you want the "A Saver" rider.
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