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Medishield Comparison. Find out which is the cheapest

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Old 09-11-2017, 04:22 PM   #631
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Is it ok to Upgrade from MAX B to Max A , if i have small medical problem like Renal stones ?Will they exclude my conditions?
or what is best rider for MAX B( if cannot Upgrade).
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Old 09-11-2017, 10:50 PM   #632
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Is it ok to Upgrade from MAX B to Max A , if i have small medical problem like Renal stones ?Will they exclude my conditions?
or what is best rider for MAX B( if cannot Upgrade).
I guess ur renal stone is discovered pretty recently?
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Old 10-11-2017, 08:44 AM   #633
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Is it ok to Upgrade from MAX B to Max A , if i have small medical problem like Renal stones ?Will they exclude my conditions?
You have to ask and get that clarified, but the answer will probably be either:

(a) Your request to upgrade is denied, or
(b) Your request to upgrade is approved, but any future medical treatment related to renal stones will be covered only to your previous insurance level (B level).

In the case of (b), you don’t get any premium discount for the exclusion.

or what is best rider for MAX B( if cannot Upgrade).
There’s an optional B rider aligned with that B base plan, but adding a rider is also an upgrade, with the same pre-existing condition issue. Either they won’t let you add the rider, or they’ll let you add it but the rider won’t cover anything related to your renal stones.

The only changes that don’t come with pre-existing condition exclusions are downgrades, in your case going from B (no riders) to B Lite (no riders). You still have to declare pre-existing conditions if the insurance company asks, and clarify that they are not excluded, but the insurance company is very happy to downgrade you if you wish since it helps reduce their expenses for a “high risk” policyholder.

You might still upgrade if allowed, even with the exclusion. Then, if you have anything related to renal stones in the future, go to a public hospital and check into either A ward (if you don’t mind the deductible and co-pays) or B1 ward (if you want to reduce out-of-pocket costs). For other medical conditions you can go to the “in network” providers. This is tricky, though, because you have to guess what the insurance company will do in terms of how they handle the exclusion. If you’re going to the hospital to get treatment for a brain tumor, then it’s hard to imagine how that would be related to renal stones. But if there’s some reasonable medical argument that past renal stones contributed to a future medical condition, then the exclusion can kick in.

Personally I wouldn’t want that complexity, so the maximum I’d consider is adding the B rider to your current plan. Then you’d have an exclusion on the rider, but you don’t have to worry about which medical provider to visit. If the exclusion kicks in, OK, you’ve got a deductible and co-pay — not the end of the world. But the insurance company can’t deny the whole claim because you saw the wrong medical provider for that diagnosis. You stick with public hospitals, and you’re covered. Either from first dollar (rider applicable) or not (rider excluded), but you’re covered. Then you just decide whether the rider is worth the cash premium you’d have to pay.

There’s another possibility, which is that the insurance company will let you upgrade but will consider renal stones to be an exclusion that lasts for some period of time — say, 24 months. That is, if there’s anything medically related to renal stones that happens in the future, within 24 months of the upgrade, they won’t cover it (at the higher insurance level). Past 24 months, they’ll forget about the renal stones and remove the exclusion. It doesn’t hurt to ask them if they’ll do that. If the insurance company likes the extra premium dollars, they might accept that deal.
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Last edited by BBCWatcher; 10-11-2017 at 08:49 AM..
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Old 10-11-2017, 10:47 AM   #634
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I guess ur renal stone is discovered pretty recently?
yes. around 8 months back
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Old 11-11-2017, 05:03 PM   #635
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I don’t think deductible is payable by Medisave.

Agree with this. That's why I choose aviva option A. I believe the deductible can pay using medisave as well right? So essentially still 0 cash
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Old 11-11-2017, 05:21 PM   #636
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I don’t think deductible is payable by Medisave.
An Integrated Shield plan rider cannot be paid with Medisave funds. Only the base Integrated Shield plan premium is Medisave payable. However, once you have a medical claim, yes, you can pay all Medisave qualified medical expenses, including the co-insurance amount (the deductible and co-pay) that your Integrated Shield plan doesn't cover.
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Old 18-11-2017, 01:58 PM   #637
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Look of IP

Hi.

Will anyone able to better advice what isp should I go for?

I'm 33 in my next birthday.
I'm looking at A or B1 with riders covered.

Thanks in advance!
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Old 18-11-2017, 02:17 PM   #638
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Hi.

Will anyone able to better advice what isp should I go for?

I'm 33 in my next birthday.
I'm looking at A or B1 with riders covered.

Thanks in advance!
AXA Shield plan B and Basic Care rider for Restructured ward A and below.
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Old 19-11-2017, 02:58 AM   #639
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For private plan, AIA A + A Saver is still the better option out there?
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Old 19-11-2017, 04:27 AM   #640
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For private plan, AIA A + A Saver is still the better option out there?
Yes for me.
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Old 19-11-2017, 10:15 PM   #641
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I'm looking at A or B1 with riders covered.
My current favorite public hospital A ward plan is Prudential's. It seems to have the fewest "gotcha" coverage gaps. Their PRUextra Plus Lite is well designed, too. "Lite" still has an annual deductible, but it cuts the deductible in half and eliminates the co-pays. That's fine. In my view you shouldn't buy insurance to cover events that are not catastrophic, and a $1,750 annual deductible is not pleasant but is generally manageable. And you pay a lower premium for that rider, of course, so I think it's a good value.

Prudential doesn't offer a B1 ward plan, though, so that's a potential issue if you ever plan to downgrade (and have preexisting conditions at that point).
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Old 20-11-2017, 08:34 AM   #642
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AXA Shield plan B and Basic Care rider for Restructured ward A and below.
My current favorite public hospital A ward plan is Prudential's. It seems to have the fewest "gotcha" coverage gaps. Their PRUextra Plus Lite is well designed, too. "Lite" still has an annual deductible, but it cuts the deductible in half and eliminates the co-pays. That's fine. In my view you shouldn't buy insurance to cover events that are not catastrophic, and a $1,750 annual deductible is not pleasant but is generally manageable. And you pay a lower premium for that rider, of course, so I think it's a good value.

Prudential doesn't offer a B1 ward plan, though, so that's a potential issue if you ever plan to downgrade (and have preexisting conditions at that point).
Thanks for all the feedback! I was looking at NTUC and AXA initially. Will look into Prudential now as well. What would be the "gotchas" that I need to look out for in general? Thank!
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Old 20-11-2017, 08:58 AM   #643
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Prudential doesn't offer a B1 ward plan, though, so that's a potential issue if you ever plan to downgrade (and have preexisting conditions at that point).
Yup, that's a big problem but I figured they will come up with one when the need arises.
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Old 20-11-2017, 10:44 AM   #644
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What would be the "gotchas" that I need to look out for in general?
Just look at the coverage tables (and policy documents that MOH posts) for limitations added to the words "As Charged," and also at limit values. For example, Prudential covers hospitalization-related outpatient care up to 180 days pre-hospitalization and up to 365 post-hospitalization. That's the best you can get among public hospital plans (tied with one other carrier), although AIA's private plan will go up to 13 months/13 months with select medical providers. As another example, Prudential doesn't cap the number of community hospital days. None of the Integrated Shield plans are bulletproof, but I think Prudential compares rather well on coverage terms.

Yup, that's a big problem but I figured they will come up with one when the need arises.
I should clarify that Prudential doesn't have an "As Charged" public hospital B ward plan. They only let you drop down to a Standard plan, but that's a big drop.

Prudential might introduce an "As Charged" B ward plan in the future if A ward medical costs rise beyond a certain level, but that's speculative. I wouldn't assume that. Although I suppose it's possible that carriers that do offer "As Charged" B ward plans will drop them. I'd just be "pleasantly surprised" if you can downgrade in the future. I think you ought to pick the plan you would "most likely" stay with, for life.
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Old 24-11-2017, 01:04 PM   #645
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I should clarify that Prudential doesn't have an "As Charged" public hospital B ward plan. They only let you drop down to a Standard plan, but that's a big drop.

Prudential might introduce an "As Charged" B ward plan in the future if A ward medical costs rise beyond a certain level, but that's speculative. I wouldn't assume that. Although I suppose it's possible that carriers that do offer "As Charged" B ward plans will drop them. I'd just be "pleasantly surprised" if you can downgrade in the future. I think you ought to pick the plan you would "most likely" stay with, for life.
Yeah, that goes without saying. A B1 as charged plan is the best minimum during our old age, thus I seriously think any insurance companies will end up with one eventually.

Unless really can't afford, Medishield Life is still available, just that one cannot choose a doctor.

I was chatting with a colleague whose mother just got hospitalized at the age of 86. Now C class wards also have air conditioning!
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