HWZ Forums

Login Register FAQ Mark Forums Read

learning japanese

Like Tree274Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-12-2005, 03:55 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,635
wat do u mean by teaching method? japanese to start off with is a lot of memorizing (as in most foreign languages anyway) with 4 writing methods namely hiragana, katakana, roma-ji(english translations) & kanji (chinese characters). There are around 50++ characters each to memorize for hiragana and katakana.......ermm...if u ask me, any school is around the same although the more common ones are Bunka, Hougang Japanese School, and of course, JCS.
ShougunX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2005, 06:43 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
kingz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 802
i see...but i not sure which school is good. Because i am new to japanese and may be slow in learning it. i would prefer a smaller class size though
kingz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2005, 09:57 PM   #18
Arch-Supremacy Member
 
direbmem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 10,963
Hmm, think they jus raised to price to $400 per course, but if you stick with them for a year, you get an all expense paid trip to Japan, provided you pass the JLPT exam for your level lah.

The schedule, you'll have to call them up, 6333 3314.


Life is a choice, it might not be a choice you like, but nonetheless IT IS A CHOICE,
Will
i need a confirmation on this.not advertise on website leh.if its true , i will learn myself first, then sign up for course in order to go japan for free
direbmem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2005, 05:20 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
kingz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 802
wow so gd offer? which sch is that?
kingz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2005, 03:51 PM   #20
Arch-Supremacy Member
 
Asphodeli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 14,501
First japanese language teacher was a singaporean. Therefore my basic foundation very stable as singaporeans can explain better...wayyyyyyyy better than japanese teachers.

Then intermediate and advance follow up by the principle himself whom was a japanese but had migrated to singapore tens of yrs ago, married and start a family here.....therefore he can speak chinese (impressive) and hokkien (even more impressive). Therefore, i am lucky to have a native japanese that can explain damn well.

Anyway, that was at Hougang Japanese School. The Hougang branch was the first japanese school in singapore. Although the hougang branch looks dirty and ancient, do not let it deceive you. It is a rather good school and the teachers (according to my experience) are willing to go beyond the stipulated hours to teach and explain more if u request.

Btw, tat was almost 5 yrs ago.....JCS was not bad. Tried it this yr cos very near my workplace.

Had frens studying in bunka....i was not impressed with their so called 'patented' special learning method when i read thru the notes and heard the studying method adopted there. Found that the basic foundation would not be strong. But then that's my personal opinion. Never really tried myself so can't really judge.
Does the JCS have part time weekend classes? Appears that they don't have part time courses also on their website...
Asphodeli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2005, 02:16 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,635
they have wkend classes but i think u have to ask them. call them up or visit the website lor.
ShougunX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2005, 02:20 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,635
i see...but i not sure which school is good. Because i am new to japanese and may be slow in learning it. i would prefer a smaller class size though
yes, i do agree tat a smaller class would be preferable. In hougang, a class size ranges around 10 - 20. But as u advance, u may find the class getting smaller and smaller.....it would be good to ask about the class size first. Some institutions would not start a class before the registered members hit a certain quota. start off slowly. Japanese can be quite confusing at the start (not to indicate other languages are not). Build up a firm foundation and u will enjoy it. Good luck to you!
ShougunX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-12-2005, 10:07 AM   #23
Master Member
 
fumofumo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,647
how abt japanese for children?

My colleague's 10 yr old son wanna learn japanese... and seems onli inoue got courses for children?
__________________
[SIZE=1]inactive[/SIZE]
fumofumo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-12-2005, 10:39 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,635
Wa 10-yr old learn japanese??? unless enroll him into an international school lor.....i'm not sure.....it would be rather hard and different in teaching a kid and an adult. Sorrie, I can't help in this area. Calling other language schools should help. JCS, given the direct link to the Japanese Ambassy should have a solution for that. Why not try calling them?
ShougunX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-12-2005, 12:06 PM   #25
Master Member
 
spicyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 3,166
So only got 2 schools have webby to see?
spicyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-12-2005, 04:27 PM   #26
Arch-Supremacy Member
 
Asphodeli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 14,501
Websites:

Bunka Language Sch
http://www.bunkalang.com/

Inoue
http://www.inoue.com.sg/

Alexandra/Hougang Japanese Language School
http://web.singnet.com.sg/~sakura42/

JCS
http://www.jcss.org.sg/
Asphodeli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-12-2005, 02:51 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,635
So only got 2 schools have webby to see?
nothing beats goin down to the schools personnally to take a look to assess whether the school suits u or whether the teachers are good.
ShougunX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2006, 01:15 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 586
questions about JCS

hello

has anyone attended the elementary course at JCS ?

called up once to enquire and they mentioned that their courses are not geared towards the passing of JLPT and just for people who are interested in learning the language and their courses takes one year per level and to complete their course takes 5 years

so i went to bunka instead for their elementary 1 course

not bad but a bit rush since 1 session is 3 hours per week, too fast a pace for me to absorb and since i am quite lazy and does not practise much

thinking of signing up for the elementary course at JCS in june, which is the intensive course but i asked them if i am unable to make for a day, there is no replacement clasee provided and one shot , the lession is 4 hours per session, is it too stressful ?

can anyone comment ?

really want to learn my japanese well and hopefully can get a job and then can work and live in japan !
v1hypersg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2006, 01:52 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,635
The courses prepared in JCS are not geared towards JLPT but then, aren't all lessons good in preparing you for that paper!?? haha.

I also have dreams of working in japan but the best i can get is working in a japanese company dealing with the japanese accounts. Not bad, i am using an 'imported' pc from japan with japanese windows OS and systems and all. Coz companies in japan usually prefer one to have a japanese degree....they have a lot of pride in their nation

As for intensiveness of course...rather intensive. And my advise is to go slow for foundation coz if ur foundation is weak, u will get into more troubles once u approach the higher levels which can be more confusing.

Last edited by ShougunX; 24-01-2006 at 01:56 PM..
ShougunX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2006, 02:46 PM   #30
Member
 
ender51244's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 384
i don't think its 4 hours per session. i think its 2 hours per session for 2 days in a week. you better check the schedule properly. for level 1 & 2, it is really simple, as long as you follow what the text book says. for me, i could easily breeze through the first 2 years (yes, i spent 5 hours studying for the exam and i can get over 75 marks). but when you begin the 3rd year, you really have to work very hard as the lessons are very solid. there is a jump in standards, really. so that is why you will NEVER see intensive courses for level 3 (aka Advance 1). the approach will be slow for you to catch up you studies.

but the most important part is patience and being hard-working. As JCS is subsidise by the japanese embassy, the school fees is considered cheap and lessons are more "traditional". Each year, you will see long queues outside JCS to be enrolled into the sch (though it isn't as long as it used to be... but you will still see queues from the 5th floor to the ground floor and all the way to the THIS FASHION shop.) You will always see the class full in the beginning of the year but by mid-year, half the class is already gone. My class has around 25 students when term started but is left with 8 miserable people (including me) by the end of the year.

you can also take a look at the sch statistics. as the level goes up, you can see the number of people failing is lesser. as people who could make it past the 3rd year will are students who are really serious in studying Japanese. JCS is also proud to put up the statistics that students studying over at JCS will have a higher passing rate in JLPT. In addition, there are also JLPT preparation classes available in April and August to aid to get through the JLPT exams.

Bunka and JCS - the differences being JCS focus more on grammar components whereas Bunka focus more on the oral components. Of course, to get your foundation strong, you will need JCS but you won't get much out of your listening and oral parts. In this case, you can always make up by going for extra classes (a little more money, but at least you get discount, if you already is a student there.) like conversation courses.

Word of caution - working in Japan requires the usage of Keigo, which is another language all together. Apart from the 13 form variations to a word you will learn in Japanese, you need to learn Keigo to be able to work in a Japanese company in Japan. the words you use when you speak to your boss/clients is different when you speak to your colleagues. there is also another set of words you will need to use when you speak to your subordinates.

i'm not trying to scare you or anything, but learning Japanese isn't as easy as you think and there are alot of things to learn. Even i'm learning more daily.

and due to the fact that i have been studying at JCS for a long time without trying other Japanese schools, the "advice" above might not be that accurate. Sorry if i have been mis-leading in any way.

Last edited by ender51244; 25-01-2006 at 03:13 PM..
ender51244 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Important Forum Advisory Note
This forum is moderated by volunteer moderators who will react only to members' feedback on posts. Moderators are not employees or representatives of HWZ. Forum members and moderators are responsible for their own posts.

Please refer to our Terms of Service for more information.


Thread Tools

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On