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Old 27-05-2020, 07:10 AM   #9196
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Definitely. That's the whole point of even investing in a NAS in the first place isn't it. ?

Suppose the contrary, IF after you have spent near to a $1K or even more for a capable NAS inclusive of harddisks which your expectation that you can put your data in there knowing it will be safe in it, but you decided to just take a gamble on the power supply, which is the most obvious criterion to reliability of an electrical appliance, knowing there are potential file or disk corruption or system failure in the event of a electrical surge or outrage, that doesn't seems like a sensible choice, isn't it

Consideration that it is a consumer class product used in a consumer scenario and therefore it doesn't require electrical protection compared to a multi-million dollar enterprise scenario seems rather unfitting in my opinion.

An enterprise loses reputation, loses customer confidence, loses credibility and definitely loses money and opportunity when your hardware or software fails. That is something we can all appreciate.

How about consumer, loses an entire collection of photographs of once in a life time honeymoon with your wife 10-30 years ago ? Can you get it back ? Loses the photograph of your parents taken 30 years ago, of your grannies, of someone you loved but no longer around, is it of less importance compared to the company losing data ?

How about the thesis that you have written 20 years back, that you know it is of importance to you, or perhaps an assignment you have just written 1 month ago, and you decided to place it into the NAS because you know it is a safe place to store your data. Does losing any of these information, or they are corrupted in some way which you never detect them, means less important to you as an individual compared to a company or a country ?

Redundancy is not backup. That is what some of us understand. However, when is the last time you went through all your photos or documents that you have saved in your NAS since 5-10 years ago, validate that they are still the way they are when stored into the NAS ?

Will backup solved the problem ? Think of this very common scenario, used in almost all backup strategy.

1) Store fresh data in NAS.
2) Periodically backup happens, maybe daily, weekly or monthly. Same data stored in another storage device
3) Retrieve the same piece of data, edit it and save back into the disk.
4) While saving, power outrage and the NAS just shutdown in the middle of the copy
5) Another period as past, backup from NAS into backup device

What happened ? Did the backup save your day ? If one is not even willing to invest in a UPS, I highly doubt one will be doing differential or incremental backup practised in an enterprise environment.

I know what some might say "Hey, you should have checked the data is written properly when the data is written". Sure one piece of data, no problem.

1000 piece of photos you are copy over from your host to the NAS, if you will check every single pieces after writing, sure. Good for you for you are a very diligent and cautious person. Do make sure you are regimental about it. That's part of the workflow to ensure data integrity. Otherwise no RAID or Backup is going to save your day

Bitrot, anyone heard before ? RAID write hole, anyone heard before ? How do you detect bit rot ? Technique read and write every single bits on the hard disk, that's why data scrubbing exist. RAID write hole ? Again data scrubbing, and even simple data scrubbing doesn't protect against, which is why with the introduction of BTRFS in Synology, it has file scrubbing to help in another level using checksum.

As you have mentioned, because you have placed all your data into one basket, and even most backup strategy employed are copy over without versioning, it is not as safe as one think it is.

Indeed how many times of power outrages do we experience in a year to be considered a good sample size to come to the conclusion the the NAS alone without any power outrage protection is a robust system ? Lets say 2 times of outrage per year, how about be prudent once every month ? Is 3.28767123% is a good statistics to call out a system as been robust if it happens every month. What is the statistic of flipping a coin falling on its head ? 50%. High enough ? Can you be sure the next time you flip it will fall on its tail ? What is 3.28% compared to 50% as a reliable experience to brand a system without power outrage protection for most of us, power outrage are rare. In my experience, I have only encountered them almost once a year or even rarer. How many times will it take to corrupt the files in your NAS ? Once. Which one it is will really depends on how lucky you are.

For me, I'm very lucky in a sense that my NAS has never broken down for 10 years, but in this forum and in fact in this thread, I keep seeing some people asking about where to RMA their faulty unit. Should I be complacent? I can definitely live for a month without my NAS if I need to RMA it, or I simply just buy a new unit to replace the current one. But will you be able to retrieve back a 5 year old piece of photo, corrupted 2 years ago without you know, overwritten again and again for the last 3 years into your backup ?

Well Good for you for you have chosen a path to better protect your data having the UPS is in my opinion, a significantly lesser cost compared to a SDG±1K solution.

For me, my data are uploaded daily to AWS S3 Deep Glacier with document versioning, because my thousands of RAW photos, especially my marriage, family photos/videos taken during tours are especially important to me, more so the older I get.

Personally I don't scrimp on such stuffs because I have the technical know how to make machines work for me, and if I measure the cost of losing my data to an undetectable situation, I would have invested in a solution that give me a piece of mind. Enterprise or Consumer is totally beside the point, because the perspective of COST is different.

Also as another poster have suggested, switch on your documents versioning on your NAS if such a feature is available. HyperBackup also support backup versioning, so use it if you can.

However so, the ultimate decision is the owner of his/her data. If you value your data, you know what to do. If you think you are adequately protected, good for you. That's all I have to share.
Thanks for the insight! Appreciate it
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Old 27-05-2020, 07:47 AM   #9197
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Just to chime in, I also opted to get a UPS. Was fortunate to get a 500W version in Lazada for only $80ish.

My thinking, since I already invested in hardware and putting all my files in it (all my eggs in 1 basket), then I should at least do everything that I can to make my hardware as 'safe' as possible.

IMO, well worth the purchase for my peace of mind
I posted in here before about my experience, but I actually lost my data from a sudden power trip in my block during my early NAS days. Mine not even an old block, I think was around 8 years old.
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Old 27-05-2020, 10:21 AM   #9198
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I am new to this NAS thing thus i am curious, if i am copying over 1000 photos over to my NAS for example and if a power outage happens won't my photos still remains in my existing source before copying over?

I read a few replies that a reliable power source for your NAS is important? what would be a good power source?cables? plugs? watt?

Definitely. That's the whole point of even investing in a NAS in the first place isn't it. ?

Suppose the contrary, IF after you have spent near to a $1K or even more for a capable NAS inclusive of harddisks which your expectation that you can put your data in there knowing it will be safe in it, but you decided to just take a gamble on the power supply, which is the most obvious criterion to reliability of an electrical appliance, knowing there are potential file or disk corruption or system failure in the event of a electrical surge or outrage, that doesn't seems like a sensible choice, isn't it

Consideration that it is a consumer class product used in a consumer scenario and therefore it doesn't require electrical protection compared to a multi-million dollar enterprise scenario seems rather unfitting in my opinion.

An enterprise loses reputation, loses customer confidence, loses credibility and definitely loses money and opportunity when your hardware or software fails. That is something we can all appreciate.

How about consumer, loses an entire collection of photographs of once in a life time honeymoon with your wife 10-30 years ago ? Can you get it back ? Loses the photograph of your parents taken 30 years ago, of your grannies, of someone you loved but no longer around, is it of less importance compared to the company losing data ?

How about the thesis that you have written 20 years back, that you know it is of importance to you, or perhaps an assignment you have just written 1 month ago, and you decided to place it into the NAS because you know it is a safe place to store your data. Does losing any of these information, or they are corrupted in some way which you never detect them, means less important to you as an individual compared to a company or a country ?

Redundancy is not backup. That is what some of us understand. However, when is the last time you went through all your photos or documents that you have saved in your NAS since 5-10 years ago, validate that they are still the way they are when stored into the NAS ?

Will backup solved the problem ? Think of this very common scenario, used in almost all backup strategy.

1) Store fresh data in NAS.
2) Periodically backup happens, maybe daily, weekly or monthly. Same data stored in another storage device
3) Retrieve the same piece of data, edit it and save back into the disk.
4) While saving, power outrage and the NAS just shutdown in the middle of the copy
5) Another period as past, backup from NAS into backup device

What happened ? Did the backup save your day ? If one is not even willing to invest in a UPS, I highly doubt one will be doing differential or incremental backup practised in an enterprise environment.

I know what some might say "Hey, you should have checked the data is written properly when the data is written". Sure one piece of data, no problem.

1000 piece of photos you are copy over from your host to the NAS, if you will check every single pieces after writing, sure. Good for you for you are a very diligent and cautious person. Do make sure you are regimental about it. That's part of the workflow to ensure data integrity. Otherwise no RAID or Backup is going to save your day

Bitrot, anyone heard before ? RAID write hole, anyone heard before ? How do you detect bit rot ? Technique read and write every single bits on the hard disk, that's why data scrubbing exist. RAID write hole ? Again data scrubbing, and even simple data scrubbing doesn't protect against, which is why with the introduction of BTRFS in Synology, it has file scrubbing to help in another level using checksum.

As you have mentioned, because you have placed all your data into one basket, and even most backup strategy employed are copy over without versioning, it is not as safe as one think it is.

Indeed how many times of power outrages do we experience in a year to be considered a good sample size to come to the conclusion the the NAS alone without any power outrage protection is a robust system ? Lets say 2 times of outrage per year, how about be prudent once every month ? Is 3.28767123% is a good statistics to call out a system as been robust if it happens every month. What is the statistic of flipping a coin falling on its head ? 50%. High enough ? Can you be sure the next time you flip it will fall on its tail ? What is 3.28% compared to 50% as a reliable experience to brand a system without power outrage protection for most of us, power outrage are rare. In my experience, I have only encountered them almost once a year or even rarer. How many times will it take to corrupt the files in your NAS ? Once. Which one it is will really depends on how lucky you are.

For me, I'm very lucky in a sense that my NAS has never broken down for 10 years, but in this forum and in fact in this thread, I keep seeing some people asking about where to RMA their faulty unit. Should I be complacent? I can definitely live for a month without my NAS if I need to RMA it, or I simply just buy a new unit to replace the current one. But will you be able to retrieve back a 5 year old piece of photo, corrupted 2 years ago without you know, overwritten again and again for the last 3 years into your backup ?

Well Good for you for you have chosen a path to better protect your data having the UPS is in my opinion, a significantly lesser cost compared to a SDG±1K solution.

For me, my data are uploaded daily to AWS S3 Deep Glacier with document versioning, because my thousands of RAW photos, especially my marriage, family photos/videos taken during tours are especially important to me, more so the older I get.

Personally I don't scrimp on such stuffs because I have the technical know how to make machines work for me, and if I measure the cost of losing my data to an undetectable situation, I would have invested in a solution that give me a piece of mind. Enterprise or Consumer is totally beside the point, because the perspective of COST is different.

Also as another poster have suggested, switch on your documents versioning on your NAS if such a feature is available. HyperBackup also support backup versioning, so use it if you can.

However so, the ultimate decision is the owner of his/her data. If you value your data, you know what to do. If you think you are adequately protected, good for you. That's all I have to share.
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Old 27-05-2020, 11:02 AM   #9199
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Definitely. That's the whole point of even investing in a NAS in the first place isn't it. ?

Suppose the contrary, IF after you have spent near to a $1K or even more for a capable NAS inclusive of harddisks which your expectation that you can put your data in there knowing it will be safe in it, but you decided to just take a gamble on the power supply, which is the most obvious criterion to reliability of an electrical appliance, knowing there are potential file or disk corruption or system failure in the event of a electrical surge or outrage, that doesn't seems like a sensible choice, isn't it

Consideration that it is a consumer class product used in a consumer scenario and therefore it doesn't require electrical protection compared to a multi-million dollar enterprise scenario seems rather unfitting in my opinion.

An enterprise loses reputation, loses customer confidence, loses credibility and definitely loses money and opportunity when your hardware or software fails. That is something we can all appreciate.

How about consumer, loses an entire collection of photographs of once in a life time honeymoon with your wife 10-30 years ago ? Can you get it back ? Loses the photograph of your parents taken 30 years ago, of your grannies, of someone you loved but no longer around, is it of less importance compared to the company losing data ?

How about the thesis that you have written 20 years back, that you know it is of importance to you, or perhaps an assignment you have just written 1 month ago, and you decided to place it into the NAS because you know it is a safe place to store your data. Does losing any of these information, or they are corrupted in some way which you never detect them, means less important to you as an individual compared to a company or a country ?

Redundancy is not backup. That is what some of us understand. However, when is the last time you went through all your photos or documents that you have saved in your NAS since 5-10 years ago, validate that they are still the way they are when stored into the NAS ?

Will backup solved the problem ? Think of this very common scenario, used in almost all backup strategy.

1) Store fresh data in NAS.
2) Periodically backup happens, maybe daily, weekly or monthly. Same data stored in another storage device
3) Retrieve the same piece of data, edit it and save back into the disk.
4) While saving, power outrage and the NAS just shutdown in the middle of the copy
5) Another period as past, backup from NAS into backup device

What happened ? Did the backup save your day ? If one is not even willing to invest in a UPS, I highly doubt one will be doing differential or incremental backup practised in an enterprise environment.

I know what some might say "Hey, you should have checked the data is written properly when the data is written". Sure one piece of data, no problem.

1000 piece of photos you are copy over from your host to the NAS, if you will check every single pieces after writing, sure. Good for you for you are a very diligent and cautious person. Do make sure you are regimental about it. That's part of the workflow to ensure data integrity. Otherwise no RAID or Backup is going to save your day

Bitrot, anyone heard before ? RAID write hole, anyone heard before ? How do you detect bit rot ? Technique read and write every single bits on the hard disk, that's why data scrubbing exist. RAID write hole ? Again data scrubbing, and even simple data scrubbing doesn't protect against, which is why with the introduction of BTRFS in Synology, it has file scrubbing to help in another level using checksum.

As you have mentioned, because you have placed all your data into one basket, and even most backup strategy employed are copy over without versioning, it is not as safe as one think it is.

Indeed how many times of power outrages do we experience in a year to be considered a good sample size to come to the conclusion the the NAS alone without any power outrage protection is a robust system ? Lets say 2 times of outrage per year, how about be prudent once every month ? Is 3.28767123% is a good statistics to call out a system as been robust if it happens every month. What is the statistic of flipping a coin falling on its head ? 50%. High enough ? Can you be sure the next time you flip it will fall on its tail ? What is 3.28% compared to 50% as a reliable experience to brand a system without power outrage protection for most of us, power outrage are rare. In my experience, I have only encountered them almost once a year or even rarer. How many times will it take to corrupt the files in your NAS ? Once. Which one it is will really depends on how lucky you are.

For me, I'm very lucky in a sense that my NAS has never broken down for 10 years, but in this forum and in fact in this thread, I keep seeing some people asking about where to RMA their faulty unit. Should I be complacent? I can definitely live for a month without my NAS if I need to RMA it, or I simply just buy a new unit to replace the current one. But will you be able to retrieve back a 5 year old piece of photo, corrupted 2 years ago without you know, overwritten again and again for the last 3 years into your backup ?

Well Good for you for you have chosen a path to better protect your data having the UPS is in my opinion, a significantly lesser cost compared to a SDG±1K solution.

For me, my data are uploaded daily to AWS S3 Deep Glacier with document versioning, because my thousands of RAW photos, especially my marriage, family photos/videos taken during tours are especially important to me, more so the older I get.

Personally I don't scrimp on such stuffs because I have the technical know how to make machines work for me, and if I measure the cost of losing my data to an undetectable situation, I would have invested in a solution that give me a piece of mind. Enterprise or Consumer is totally beside the point, because the perspective of COST is different.

Also as another poster have suggested, switch on your documents versioning on your NAS if such a feature is available. HyperBackup also support backup versioning, so use it if you can.

However so, the ultimate decision is the owner of his/her data. If you value your data, you know what to do. If you think you are adequately protected, good for you. That's all I have to share.
i super value...

hence...

918+ backup to another 918+
both connected to UPS.
both on RAID5 (prev on RAID6 when i was on DS1515+ & DX513)
with Hyper Backup + Versioning

Considered backup?

Processor
Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E4600
Mainboard
Irvine-GL6E
Graphics Card
Intel HD
Memory
4096MB DDR2
Display
Acer Predator X34A
Storage
Samsung 850 EVO 500GB SSD
Casing
S3380D HomePC
Audio
High Definition 6-channel audio
OS
Windows 10 Home SL

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Old 27-05-2020, 12:37 PM   #9200
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I am new to this NAS thing thus i am curious, if i am copying over 1000 photos over to my NAS for example and if a power outage happens won't my photos still remains in my existing source before copying over?

I read a few replies that a reliable power source for your NAS is important? what would be a good power source?cables? plugs? watt?
Of course it will, but will you bother to copy over again that 1000 photos, or you will realise 200 has completed, and you will just copy over the missing 800? Will you find out out of the 200 that went thru, you will check if all all intact? Remember harddisk have write caches, just because it is completely written recognised by the OS, doesn’t mean the data has been written into the platters. You have to check that you have configured your NAS to have no write cache for the harddisk and no write cache means your write speed will suffer. That is why hardware raid comes with optional battery packs to ensure best write speed and yet in the event of a server sudden failure, the unwritten cache in the hardware card will be sustained for normally up to 72hrs and can be written into the drives once the server start again. The UPS plays such a role for a consumer grade software raid solution.

UPS will be a reliable power source, because it plays the role of power surge prevention and also the role of switching into the battery should the mains failed. It is as if your NAS is working like a laptop with battery, however a laptop with battery is not protected from power surges.
Processor
2x E5520
Mainboard
Intel S5520HC
Graphics Card
Nvidia Quadro 600
Memory
24 GB DDR3
Display
24" Samsung LED
Storage
4x DW Velociraptor on HPT 4310 H/W RAID
Optical Storage
1x DVD
Casing
Cool Master
PSU
Forgotten
Audio
None
OS
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Old 27-05-2020, 12:39 PM   #9201
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i super value...

hence...

918+ backup to another 918+
both connected to UPS.
both on RAID5 (prev on RAID6 when i was on DS1515+ & DX513)
with Hyper Backup + Versioning

Considered backup?

Definitely

Just nitpicking (off-site too?) lolx
Processor
2x E5520
Mainboard
Intel S5520HC
Graphics Card
Nvidia Quadro 600
Memory
24 GB DDR3
Display
24" Samsung LED
Storage
4x DW Velociraptor on HPT 4310 H/W RAID
Optical Storage
1x DVD
Casing
Cool Master
PSU
Forgotten
Audio
None
OS
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise

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Old 27-05-2020, 01:02 PM   #9202
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Definitely

Just nitpicking (off-site too?) lolx
yeah, my other DS918+ is at my parents' place.

I use site to site VPN (hence why i love ASUS routers) to transfer the backup over. Once setup, everything transparent.

I have cloud storage too ~ but i rarely use it. Not that cheap i feel once your data reaches a certain "size" compared to traditional HDD.
Processor
Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E4600
Mainboard
Irvine-GL6E
Graphics Card
Intel HD
Memory
4096MB DDR2
Display
Acer Predator X34A
Storage
Samsung 850 EVO 500GB SSD
Casing
S3380D HomePC
Audio
High Definition 6-channel audio
OS
Windows 10 Home SL

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Old 27-05-2020, 01:05 PM   #9203
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yeah, my other DS918+ is at my parents' place.

I use site to site VPN (hence why i love ASUS routers) to transfer the backup over. Once setup, everything transparent.

I have cloud storage too ~ but i rarely use it. Not that cheap i feel once your data reaches a certain "size" compared to traditional HDD.
Good job!
Processor
2x E5520
Mainboard
Intel S5520HC
Graphics Card
Nvidia Quadro 600
Memory
24 GB DDR3
Display
24" Samsung LED
Storage
4x DW Velociraptor on HPT 4310 H/W RAID
Optical Storage
1x DVD
Casing
Cool Master
PSU
Forgotten
Audio
None
OS
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise

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Old 27-05-2020, 01:19 PM   #9204
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The list of compatible and tested hdd does not include some of the enterprise.
Oh they will work for sure. Enterprise HDDs are just made to be used more rigorously than consumer ones. They use the same sata and power plugs. I was actually considering the UltraStar HC310 before, but I decided going for the N300 instead.

Definitely. That's the whole point of even investing in a NAS in the first place isn't it. ?

Personally I don't scrimp on such stuffs because I have the technical know how to make machines work for me, and if I measure the cost of losing my data to an undetectable situation, I would have invested in a solution that give me a piece of mind. Enterprise or Consumer is totally beside the point, because the perspective of COST is different.

Also as another poster have suggested, switch on your documents versioning on your NAS if such a feature is available. HyperBackup also support backup versioning, so use it if you can.

However so, the ultimate decision is the owner of his/her data. If you value your data, you know what to do. If you think you are adequately protected, good for you. That's all I have to share.
On point! That's why spending a few more $ for a UPS is simply a no brainer. My most important files are using Hyperback on a Thumb Drive. And in the future, I will get another NAS for my offsite backup. Not really following the 3-2-1 principle, but it's close

In addition, I noticed that lightning has been more fierce lately - having that UPS/AVR is really a comforting thought.

I posted in here before about my experience, but I actually lost my data from a sudden power trip in my block during my early NAS days. Mine not even an old block, I think was around 8 years old.
Oh man, too bad My early NAS days I get to play around them at work - and the owner doesn't want to put UPS. The building the office was in have quarterly power shutdown activity. I already left the company. I wonder how they are doing now
__________________
hhhhmmmmm.....
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Old 27-05-2020, 02:01 PM   #9205
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I see thanks for the explanation. actually as a matter of fact i have been doing such like copying over and over again on my external hdd last time so now i thought of venturing in NAS as my files get more, and having to access them remotely.

Of course it will, but will you bother to copy over again that 1000 photos, or you will realise 200 has completed, and you will just copy over the missing 800? Will you find out out of the 200 that went thru, you will check if all all intact? Remember harddisk have write caches, just because it is completely written recognised by the OS, doesn’t mean the data has been written into the platters. You have to check that you have configured your NAS to have no write cache for the harddisk and no write cache means your write speed will suffer. That is why hardware raid comes with optional battery packs to ensure best write speed and yet in the event of a server sudden failure, the unwritten cache in the hardware card will be sustained for normally up to 72hrs and can be written into the drives once the server start again. The UPS plays such a role for a consumer grade software raid solution.

UPS will be a reliable power source, because it plays the role of power surge prevention and also the role of switching into the battery should the mains failed. It is as if your NAS is working like a laptop with battery, however a laptop with battery is not protected from power surges.
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Old 27-05-2020, 02:13 PM   #9206
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I see thanks for the explanation. actually as a matter of fact i have been doing such like copying over and over again on my external hdd last time so now i thought of venturing in NAS as my files get more, and having to access them remotely.
As preamble to choosing between an external hard disk and a NAS solution, a NAS solution is generally more involved, because you will need to map external drives, you need to manage the array, you need to take care of network and so forth. That being said, most, if not all, of what a typical consumer required are easily achieved via a web console offered by typical consumer NAS solution.

A start for new consumer on Synology, I will recommend https://blog.synology.com/everything...synology-2019/ as a starting point, then you can post ur queries in here for further clarification.
Processor
2x E5520
Mainboard
Intel S5520HC
Graphics Card
Nvidia Quadro 600
Memory
24 GB DDR3
Display
24" Samsung LED
Storage
4x DW Velociraptor on HPT 4310 H/W RAID
Optical Storage
1x DVD
Casing
Cool Master
PSU
Forgotten
Audio
None
OS
Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise

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Old 27-05-2020, 03:02 PM   #9207
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Appreciate it. Will be making my purchase once I read up.

As preamble to choosing between an external hard disk and a NAS solution, a NAS solution is generally more involved, because you will need to map external drives, you need to manage the array, you need to take care of network and so forth. That being said, most, if not all, of what a typical consumer required are easily achieved via a web console offered by typical consumer NAS solution.

A start for new consumer on Synology, I will recommend https://blog.synology.com/everything...synology-2019/ as a starting point, then you can post ur queries in here for further clarification.
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Old 27-05-2020, 04:42 PM   #9208
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anyone know how to Map Drive Remotely for my laptop?

so my laptop can access my NAS like a drive in explorer when outside with internet connection.

I can only map to my desktop at home.
Processor
i5-4760
Mainboard
asrock H81M-ITX
Memory
8GB
Display
LG 27inch Ultrawide
Storage
250GB SSD
OS
windows 10

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Old 27-05-2020, 04:45 PM   #9209
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anyone know how to Map Drive Remotely for my laptop?

so my laptop can access my NAS like a drive in explorer when outside with internet connection.

I can only map to my desktop at home.
really wouldn't recommend that. Instead, why not DS File?

Last edited by batniss; 27-05-2020 at 04:52 PM..
Processor
Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E4600
Mainboard
Irvine-GL6E
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Old 27-05-2020, 04:52 PM   #9210
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anyone know how to Map Drive Remotely for my laptop?

so my laptop can access my NAS like a drive in explorer when outside with internet connection.

I can only map to my desktop at home.
Personally I don't recommend you expose your NAS file services to external network. Consider using a VPN, which can be offered by your router if it is supported, or port forward the VPN to your OpenVPN offered by Synology NAS. After which you will be able to access the file services using Internal IP address as if you are part to your network.

You may read up on https://www.synology.com/en-global/k...nter/vpn_setup

With OpenVPN, you can configure split tunnel at your laptop, so that only your home internal IP addresses will be routed via the OpenVPN client installed on your laptop. Other traffic will continue via your default route depending on where you are, in office, or tethering 4G etc...

If however you wish to insist on public access to your fileserver, I will assume it is Windows via SMB/CIFS

Setup port forwardings TCP/445 and TCP/139 from your router to your Synology NAS IP.

You may need to also subscribe to a dynamic IP service, either on Synology https://www.synology.com/en-us/knowl...onnection_ddns or on your router, after which you will be able to access your Synology from public Internet using the dynamic hostname

Last edited by davidktw; 27-05-2020 at 04:54 PM..
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