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it_geek 14-02-2019 10:27 PM

New to RAM overclocking
 
Hi all =)


Quite a while back, I posted a thread about an aging computer that I had. I decided to just change out the RAM and it was determined to be the cause of the BSODs. Turns out the corsair ram was the most problematic and I decided to pop it over to convergent systems and try my luck. We will see how that goes as I have a 8 week waiting window. In addition, a faulty SATA cable completely halted the detection of hard drives and it has been replaced.


Now, I have obtained 4 x 2GB Kingston HyperX 1066MHz DDR2 RAM to keep this rig running.


At 1.8V and a 5-5-5-18 timing it runs only at 800MHz.


Problem is, I do want to learn how to safely overclock without destroying the RAM or my MB.


Which values should I adjust? The GIGABYTE MB is exceptionally flexible to modify every single parameter so I don't really know which to start with.


See this guide here from page 40 onwards.


Which value should I change first? I obviously have to modify the timing to 5-5-5-15, but what about the voltages? Should I only change the DRAM voltage to 2.2 or 2.3V? What about the core and termination voltages? What about the channel specific voltages? I also read somewhere that the North Bridge voltage must be changed also... but by how much is a question that remains unknown.


Also, I am only using the stock heatsink for this RAM, is it necessarily to get an additional cooler if I am intending to overclock the RAM?


Specs for this computer are available in my previous thread (link in the first sentence...)


Appreciate everyone's help here, then perhaps I am more ready to overclock future more powerful rigs. I am learning how to overclock for training first.

it_geek 15-02-2019 11:33 PM

So... no one can offer some advice on this :s11:

it_geek 19-02-2019 04:12 PM

up for advice!

shawntyq 19-02-2019 10:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by it_geek (Post 119211309)
So... no one can offer some advice on this :s11:

simply because the value of overclocking a ram gives near to no value for the amount of effort put into it.(but i heard Ryzen benefits more from it as compared to intel)

it is more complex as compared to overclocking other components like processor or gfx(maybe because i dont OC rams so i might find it more complex).

sorry for of no help :o

it_geek 19-02-2019 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shawntyq (Post 119279659)
simply because the value of overclocking a ram gives near to no value for the amount of effort put into it.(but i heard Ryzen benefits more from it as compared to intel)

it is more complex as compared to overclocking other components like processor or gfx(maybe because i dont OC rams so i might find it more complex).

sorry for of no help :o


i am quite surprised.


Well obviously my DDR2 example makes no sense (how much performance benefit are you gonna gain from 216MHz? not much...), but I thought it would become more relevant with the newer generation of DDR 4 and possibly DDR 5 RAMs.

Koenig168 19-02-2019 11:41 PM

I would just leave the DDR2 at 800MHz and 1.8V and tighten the timings to 5-5-5-15.

If you wish, you can OC to 1066MHz at 2.2V and 5-5-5-15. Test for stability and then decrease the voltage until unstable and bring the voltage back up two notches.

narkizy 20-02-2019 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by it_geek (Post 119280509)
i am quite surprised.


Well obviously my DDR2 example makes no sense (how much performance benefit are you gonna gain from 216MHz? not much...), but I thought it would become more relevant with the newer generation of DDR 4 and possibly DDR 5 RAMs.

Mostly because you mentioned your ddr2 example which is quite old and obselete, and yes, the benefits are close to negligible thats why no one bothered to reply xD

Now back to the current times, overclocking ddr4 ram is almost exclusively for ryzen chips since it helps in achieving a slight boost in the overclock due to the infinity fabric in ryzen CPUs. For intel chips faster ram is almost useless so overclocking is pointless. So tldr: depends on the CPU.

Rashkae 20-02-2019 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by it_geek (Post 119280509)
i am quite surprised.


Well obviously my DDR2 example makes no sense (how much performance benefit are you gonna gain from 216MHz? not much...), but I thought it would become more relevant with the newer generation of DDR 4 and possibly DDR 5 RAMs.

Overclocking DDR2 is much much simpler than DDR4. So, there is no relevance really.

Ark Law 20-02-2019 10:55 AM

I seriously recommend Koi's advice of throw and buying new hardware

it_geek 20-02-2019 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rashkae (Post 119285314)
Overclocking DDR2 is much much simpler than DDR4. So, there is no relevance really.


I wish it was simple. Problem is the sheer number of voltages that I need to tweak, and by how much. Probably will face the same problem with DDR4.





Quote:

Originally Posted by Ark Law (Post 119285757)
I seriously recommend Koi's advice of throw and buying new hardware


I am waiting for DDR5, hoping that it will come out this year :s12: or maybe early next year.

watzup_ken 20-02-2019 09:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by it_geek (Post 119289690)

I am waiting for DDR5, hoping that it will come out this year :s12: or maybe early next year.

Is there a particular reason why you need to wait for DDR5? I feel a lot of people want the newest, but I do question the benefit. While DDR5 will appear to be faster, the latencies will also increase drastically. For example, the first gen DDR4 is only 2133, and because of the significant increase in latency, it is actually slower than a DDR3 running at 1866 and with a tighter timing. Also if you look at the current processors, I would believe none of the processors, regardless of AMD or Intel is benefiting significantly from those rams running at 3600 or more in real life usage. It looks wonderful from memory specific benchmarks for most users, that's all.

EclipseR_ 20-02-2019 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by watzup_ken (Post 119297517)
Is there a particular reason why you need to wait for DDR5? I feel a lot of people want the newest, but I do question the benefit. While DDR5 will appear to be faster, the latencies will also increase drastically. For example, the first gen DDR4 is only 2133, and because of the significant increase in latency, it is actually slower than a DDR3 running at 1866 and with a tighter timing. Also if you look at the current processors, I would believe none of the processors, regardless of AMD or Intel is benefiting significantly from those rams running at 3600 or more in real life usage. It looks wonderful from memory specific benchmarks for most users, that's all.

I keep asking the same question to my friends

it_geek 21-02-2019 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by watzup_ken (Post 119297517)
Is there a particular reason why you need to wait for DDR5? I feel a lot of people want the newest, but I do question the benefit. While DDR5 will appear to be faster, the latencies will also increase drastically. For example, the first gen DDR4 is only 2133, and because of the significant increase in latency, it is actually slower than a DDR3 running at 1866 and with a tighter timing. Also if you look at the current processors, I would believe none of the processors, regardless of AMD or Intel is benefiting significantly from those rams running at 3600 or more in real life usage. It looks wonderful from memory specific benchmarks for most users, that's all.


The reason is simple.


Because it will push the prices down for DDR 4 RAMs.


I already know about the practical limits for DDR5 and from this point on it's going to be a large marketing gimmick :s12::s13:


But with a frenzy going after DDR5 I can quietly sneak some DDR4 RAMs for myself. :s13:

watzup_ken 21-02-2019 09:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by it_geek (Post 119299250)
The reason is simple.


Because it will push the prices down for DDR 4 RAMs.


I already know about the practical limits for DDR5 and from this point on it's going to be a large marketing gimmick :s12::s13:


But with a frenzy going after DDR5 I can quietly sneak some DDR4 RAMs for myself. :s13:

So far, I don't observe price drops on older ram when a new one comes out. Not at least after more than a year. And ram prices fluctuates, so whatever plan you have u should have a backup plan.

it_geek 21-02-2019 10:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by watzup_ken (Post 119300116)
So far, I don't observe price drops on older ram when a new one comes out. Not at least after more than a year. And ram prices fluctuates, so whatever plan you have u should have a backup plan.


i will keep that in mind.


I brought my old rig back online anyways so I am probably going to hang around a bit.


I am also not a pioneer for new technology. I usually adopt the technology 4 - 5 years after its release. No rush anyway...


I only just got my first SSD (and it's 2nd hand) - an Intel SSD 320 Series 600GB, which I paid a little over $40 for. I am still experimenting with it, but that drive had 350TB read and written onto it.


Probably aiming for the Samsung 850 Pro Series 2TB next. I am unlikely to hit the 600TBW in 10 years so I think the warranty is quite worth in my opinion. Only problem is trying to find new stock for this SSD.

If you know some lobangs for the SS 850 Pro 2TB let me know


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