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Old 08-03-2005, 01:09 AM   #1
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Overclocking FAQ



Overclocking For Noobs
Guide # 1
Guide # 2

A Beginners Guide To Overclocking
Guide # 1

Overclocking Guide
Guide # 1

All In One
Guide # 1

Guide to AMD64 Overclocking
Guide # 1

Guide # 2
How to o/c A64, I'm used to P4 systems

A64/XP overclocking guide
Guide # 1


CPU
Guide # 1
Guide # 2
Guide # 3

RAM
Guide # 1
Guide # 2
Guide # 3

GFX Card
Guide # 1
Guide # 2

Types Of Cooling
Guide # 1

Air Cooling
Guide # 1
Guide # 2

Water Cooling
Guide # 1
Guide # 2
Guide # 3

Waterchill Cooling
Guide # 1

T.E.C. Cooling
Guide # 1

Vapor Phase Change Cooling
Guide # 1
Guide # 2
Guide # 3
Guide # 4

LN2 & CO2
Guide # 1

Guidelines for Thorough Stability Testing
Guide # 1

CPU burn-in guide
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=73766 ]Guide # 1[/URL]

What is overclocking?
Guide # 1

What is CAS, tRP, and all those others mean
Guide # 1

How can I check if my overclock is stable?
Guide # 1

Which PSU for me?
Guide # 1
Guide # 2
Guide # 3

CPU, FSB, Timing Check
CPUZ

Tweaking Tools
Clockgen - Allows you to change HTT (FSB), CPU multiplier and AGP/PCIe frequency in Windows
A64 Tweaker - A program written by Australian overclocker CodeRed. Allows you to change memory settings in Windows.
MemFreq 1.1 - A program written by German overclocker goddh0r. Will calculate your memory speed, depending on which divider you're using.

Benchmarking Tools
SuperPi - Number crunching program for testing speed and stability.
Hexus Pifast - Another number crunching program.
SiSoft Sandra - System information & diagnostics utility. Includes memory and hard drive benchmark tests.
Everest Home Edition - System information & diagnostics utility that also includes memory speed testing.

GFX Benchmarks
3DMark2001SE
3DMark03
3DMark05
AquaMark3

OVERCLOCKING RAM Listings

Last edited by dfx; 02-06-2006 at 09:23 AM..
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Old 08-03-2005, 01:14 AM   #2
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Sticky Sticky please
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Old 08-03-2005, 01:39 AM   #3
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Old 08-03-2005, 02:49 AM   #4
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Okay, sticky liao... only neccessary messages will be kept
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Old 20-03-2005, 09:33 AM   #5
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great work !!!
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Old 28-03-2005, 12:11 AM   #6
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Courtesy of skeensp frm ExtremeOC forums.
juz wanted to add in to help pple

TROUBLESHOOTING your overclocked system

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay we have a sticky that tells you how to do basic overclocking. But what do you do when trouble hits. Im writing this because hopefully we can answer a lot of basic questions that are asked. Many people want to overclock their computer in one big jump so they dont have to mess with it. If you dont have patience, dont overclock!! It takes time and you have to try different things to accomplish it a lot of times.

1) Make sure you have a good bios. Try flashing to another one and see if its any better than the one you have. The latest is not always the greatest, and a good bios may not be good on your system.
2) Make sure you are running the latest chipset drivers for your motherboard.
3) Make sure you have sufficient temperatures to overclock with. If your running temps at 50C or over idle, dont bother with overclocking until you get better cooling.
4) Make sure you have a GOOD quality Power supply and watch your voltage rails. If they flunctuate too much replace it because it will limit you stability and overclocking ability.
5) Make sure your memory can handle the overclock that you want to achieve.
6)For overclocking start your Vdimm voltage at 2.8v (if your mobo maxes out at 2.7 then set it there)

Now thats the basic things to look for if you cant get very good overclocking out of your system.

Example: Your system locks up and/or reboots all the time
answer: This means your system is not stable. Could be several reasons. First try to raise your vcore by a small amount if you have enough temperature headroom. If you raise the vcore and it still happens, try loosening the ram timings and try again. If you cannot get your system stable than reduce your overclock by a small margin and try again. Many times a 3-5 Mhz FSB decrease will make it stable. Check for stability with a program like Prime95 and let it run for a minimum of an hour. (most people test for 12-24hrs) If it runs without freezing or locking up, your good to go.

Also a major reason for this problem is the lact of Rail voltages. Check your rails using MBM5 or similiar and compare them with the BIOS reading. If they are okay when system is Idle that dont mean your PSU is okay. Run prime95 and check your voltages with a voltmeter. Now run a graphic intensive application (3dmark03 or similiar), and check them again. The voltages should be in the limits below.

Rail: +5V: ~4% (+4,8V ~ +5,2V)
Rail: -5V: ~10% (-4,5V ~ -5,5V)
Rail: +12V: ~5% (+11,4V ~ +12,6V)
Rail: -12V: ~10% (-10,8V ~ -13,2V)
Rail: +3,3V: ~4% (+3,15V ~ +3,45V)

The following are the most common arrangements of ATX mobo connectors. Not all manufacturers follow the coloring below but most do. The number is the respective pin # on the connector.
1. Power Good * - Orange
2. +5Vdc - Red
3. +12Vdc - Yellow
4. -12Vdc - Blue
5. Ground - Black
6. Ground - Black

7. Ground - Black
8. Ground - Black
9. -5Vdc - White
10. +5Vdc - Red
11. +5Vdc - Red
12. +5Vdc - Red


Example: Your games or benchmarks crash to desktop
Answer: Most notably the cause of this is your overclock is too high. Most of the time its the overall speed and not just a multi or FSB issue. Reduce the overall clock speed by reducing the FSB by 5Mhz and try again. keep going until your games run smooth without crashing.

Example: Your temperatures are too high
Answer: Simple your cooling is not doing its job. There are several possible fixes.
1) remove your heatsink and reseat it using AS5 (arctic Silver 5 preferred) or similiar thermal Grease. Following all directions for applying the Thermal Grease evenly and smoothly. Application instructions
2) You might just have more wattage than your HS/Fan (or waterblock) can keep cool. If this is the case after reseating you still cannot bring temperatures down, than reduce the vcore voltage. You will probably have to reduce the overclock as well when dropping voltage.

Example: Your system will not boot up
If your system will not boot up after adjusting your bios, then turn the power off, unplug the system, and (a) use the clear CMOS jumper (b) remove the CMOS battery for about 1 minute. if you use the jumper put it back to normal operation or put the battery back in, plug the PSU in and start the computer. Go into your bios and set it up again. This is a common practice when overclocking, so get used to where your CMOS jumper is for when you need it.

Example: your system will not boot up after clearing CMOS
If you clear CMOS and system still will not boot up then you have to narrow down what the problem is. This is where having extra parts or a good friend will help out:
1) confirm that you have power coming from your PSU is the first thing. If your fans come on and optical/hard drives spin than most likely your PSU is not the problem (Sometimes it still can be at this point)
2) remove the memory one stick at a time and retry. If you only have one stick remove it and see if the mobo beeps when trying to boot. If it dont beep than its not the memory most likely so put it back in.
3) remove any PCI expansion cards that you have installed. Try to boot the machine. If nothing still leave the PCI cards out anyway.
4) unhook your hdrive and optical drives from the motherboard and try again. It will still boot up without harddrive being attached so dont worry about that.
5) Remove your video card and try another one. If you dont have another one try booting up. If it beeps than it could be your video card, you need to get another one and try it. If you dont have a friend that has one to borrow or an extra one laying around then go to your local department store and buy one try it and if it still dont work take it back.
6) Now if you still have trouble you have eliminated everything except motherboard and CPU. Most of the time (not always) it will be the motherboard IF you havent ran your CPU with excessive temperatures. If you have another CPU replace it and see if it boots up. If you dont have another one, your gonna have to buy one or put yours in another system to test out. If it works in another system you know your motherboard has bit the bullet. buy a new one.

Example: Your system just beeps when turning it on
There are several things that could cause this. Most of them are listed above but the first thing to do is try to reset the CMOS. High FSB will cause this sometimes when the memory will not run at the set speed. If you reset the CMOS and still nothing happens make sure all your cables are connected properly and all Memory and PCI/AGP cards are intalled into their sockets all the way. The easiest way is to remove them and put them back in.

Grounding problems can cause temendous hair loss when you pull it all out because you have tried everything and nothing works. lol If your motherboard is grounded to your case at any point, most of the time it will not boot up. Make sure that you motherboard is not touching any part of the inside of the case. A secure thing to do is use the felt or cardboard washers when installing your mobo in your case. This will help eliminate some of these problems.

Example: System dont boot up after adjusting FSB
Simple solution, Clear you CMOS and restart again. Go into the bios and set everything again. Its a good idea to write down things when you change them so if this happens you know where you were and can set the settings accordingly.

Example: System dont boot after flashing bios
This is a common pain and sometimes happens for no reason. (Speaking from experience ) If you have this problem you better have another bios chip for your motherboard. You can hot swap the bios chip and flash your corrupted chip only if you have another chip for your motherboard. Its a good idea to keep a spare.
1) Download this (hot swap bios chip (thanks Madramper for this link)) and prepare you floppy disk with these files.
2) Now reboot your machine and put the floppy disk that you made in the floppy drive (Hopefully you have one, If not prepare a bootable CD-ROM and add these files to it. Sometimes it works and sometimes it dont) and boot up.
3) the program will tell you when to swap bios chips follow directions and your bios chip is now programmed, hopefully if all goes well.

Example: System freezes or shuts down and will not start back up
Most of the time the cause of this is a failed Power Supply. The first thing to try is check your power supply with a volt meter to see if its putting out any current. Even if it is though, that dont mean that you have a good power supply. Try another power supply first to fix your problem. If a new power supply does not fix your problem than refer to the steps above in the : Example: your system will not boot up after clearing CMOS

Example: You finish assembling your new system and it wont start
1. Verify that you have the power supply plugged into a wall outlet, PSU turned on, and connected to the Motherboard.
2. Check the Clear CMOS jumper to verify that it is in normal mode and not Clear. (Check Motherboard manual for location)
3. Verify that fans are running and drives spinning. If neither of these occure you Power supply is not supplying voltage to the components.
4. If fans are running and drives spinning, a notable cause of this problem with a newly built system is shorting. Remove your motherboard from its case and lay it on a non-conductive piece of material. Attach your video card and power cables, memory. you will have to have the mobo close enough to your case to use the Front panel headers from your case. Connect these headers to their proper location on the Motherboard. Connect your power supply and turn it on. If your system starts now (*see footnote), you had a short somewhere. Reinstall the mobo in your case making sure that its not touching the case anywhere, and hook everything up. It should work now, if not you still have a short.
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Old 28-03-2005, 12:13 AM   #7
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Courtesy of Impaqt from ExtremeOC forums.
once again to benefit all HWZers.


The Somewhat Complete AMD 64 Overclocking Guide.

XT-Chance (And WicKed) have another A64 guide Here I Couldnt find it the other day when I wrote this. This guide offers a few more definitions, and a more detailed "How To" A Little bit more tedious approach to overclocking, but my results with this method have been very good so far.

Since we are constantly inundated with requests on how to Overclock ones A64 System, I
Figured I'd take a stab at a guide.

I've been Overclocking Computers for about 15 years, so when I built an A64 rig about 8 Months ago, I figured it would be the same as always.... (I'm now on my 3rd A64 Rig.....)

I was wrong....

Critical Overclocking Programs youíll need:

CPU-Z: General System Monitor and report.
ClockGen: Make sure your get the version for your Chipset. This program allows you to Overclock from within windows. Not always as reliable as physically changing BIOS settings, but gives you an easy way to play with your settings without dozens of reboots.
Memtest86: You'll need to run this from a Floppy or Bootable CD. This basic program is still considered the best for testing your RAM
SuperPi: Intensive mathematical program that stresses CPU/Memory pretty extensively. I like this program because it gives you a good indication of your overclock in under a minuteís time.

Critical Components for a Quality Overclock

POWER SUPPLY
Power Supplies are missed so often when it comes to figure out why your system isnt overclockig the way it should. DONT SKIMP HERE! Get yourself a quality Power Supply and you'll never regret it. The Power Supply that comes with most cases is garbage. If budget is tight, Go with an ANTEC or ENERMAX case. These usually come with a pretty decent supply. FOr detailed Power Supply Information, see DavidHammock's Power Supply Guide

RAM
A64s LOVE TCCD based ram. see Tim's TCCD Memory Guide for the best options

There are several more factors that go into a quality and Stable A64 Overclock, that there are with Older XP
and Intel based systems. A few of the factors we need to take into Consideration are

CPU Multiplier
CPU Voltage
HTT Frequency
HTT Multiplier
Memory Divider (There is ALWAYS a memory Divider with a A64 system)
Memory Voltage
Ram Timings
Chipset Voltage
AGP/PCI Lock
COOL N' QUIET

Finding the right combination of these settings is the only way to get the most out of your A64

CPU Multiplier
All A64s are at least Half Locked. This means that you can set the CPU Multiplier Lower than
stock, but not Higher. This is a Good thing. Very rarely with A64's would you ever need to raise the CPU Multiplier over
the Factory setting. The exception to this are the FX chips, they are fully unlocked.

CPU Voltage
Most A64s have a default voltage of 1.4v to 1.6V. A64s are extremely efficient and usually can only take about 1.7v before they just start producing excess heat. I've run my Mobile up to 1.9v but found it did NOT help my overclocks and simply caused the CPU to produce enormous amounts of heat. These are NOT XP-M chips! While I doubt that running voltages between 1.75 and 1.9 will cause any permanent damage, it certainly has not shown to be beneficial in any tests Iíve seen so far.

HTT Frequency
A64s donít use a traditional Front system Bus. Instead they use a HyperTransport. I can only assume its abbreviated "HTT" to differentiate between Intelís "HT" and Hyper-Threading Technology. They are VERY different.

The HyperTransport is what controls the base frequency for communications and CPU speed in our A64 System.
The CPU Speed is controlled by the HTT Multiplied by the CPU Multiplier, The HyperTransport or Memory controller is controlled by the HTT Multiplied by the HTT Multiplier, and Memory speed is controlled by the HTT Frequency, Multiplied by the CPU Multiplier and then DIVIDED by the Memory Divider. Thatís a bit confusing for most folks. And it took me a while to grasp the concept as well.

HTT Multiplier
Most AMD Motherboards are designed to handle an 800-1000 MHz Hyper Transport bus. Factory Default on Most CPUs is 800 MHz (A 4X Multiplier) this is a Critical part of Overclocking an A64 to the Max. Pushing the HyperTransport past 1Ghz can cause all kinds of system instability that is commonly misconceived as "I maxed out my CPU" or "My Ram is holding me back"

Memory Divider
This is one of the most Confusing aspects of A64 Overclocking. There is ALWAYS a memory divider.
Setting the Memory to 1:1 means that the HTT bus is multiplied by the CPU Multiplier and then Divided by the CPU Multiplier to set the Memory speed. This means that it is OK to run your Memory at its peak efficiency and still go higher with your HTT bus if your CPU can take it. Take note that I said its "OK" not advisable. There are still sufficient tests out there showing that running a 1:1 ratio will garner you the best overall performance. I plan on adding a few test results in the next week or so showing the difference in performance using a higher memory divider than CPU Multiplier.

Since A64's use an On chip memory controller, the Ratio must be calculated a bit differently than old. 5:6 is NOT always 5:6. See that chart at the end of this post for a prety darn close representation of what each divieder is doing. Thanks to Oskar from DFI for the chart.

Memory Voltage
Most motherboards offer a degree of memory voltage options. The memory of choice lately has been Samsung TCCD Based modules with Brainpower PCB's. These Modules run at 2.6v stock voltage, and can usually do no better with voltage up to about 2.8-2.9 volts. There have been a few reports of better settings with voltages over 3v, but these seem to be pretty rare
situations.

Most other memory can benefit from having additional voltage run through it. The king of this is the elusive Winbond BH-5 based memory modules. If youíre lucky enough to have some of these, you may want to invest in an OCZ Memory Voltage Booster if your motherboard is compatible as these can run some very impressive timings with a lot of voltage....
Speaking of Timings...

Memory Timings
There are 5 Numbers in our Timings that we need to worry about a lot. Personally, I would like to learn more about the other numbers, but as of this writing, I'm pretty much in the dark there.

What we do need to worry about are CAS Latency, RAS to CAS Delay, RAS Precharge, and Cycle Time(Tras), and CPC (command Per Clock)
Ideally, we want these timings to be 2-2-2-5 1T. Most TCCD based module does this at 200 MHz (DDR400) and can usually go up to 215-220 with a Bump in Voltage to 2.7, and then we need to loosen them to go higher. 2.5-3-3-7 is still considered reasonable memory timings for an A64 system, and some people even go out to 3-4-4-8, but I would personally advise against using timings that high with an A64 System. We ALWAYS want to use CPC (1T) this means the Command per Clock interface is enabled. 2T performs extremely poorly on A64 systems. But since our memory controller is on the CPU, the Double Sided memory problem that plagues XP Motherboards is not evident. Give AMD a WOOT for that one.....

Chipset Voltage
Usually just a small bump in Chipset Voltage will stabilize a flakey HTT bus. 1.6 is Stock on most motherboards, but 1.7 to 1.8 is acceptable as long as you have decent cooling on your Northbridge chip. Many A64 Motherboards use Passive heatsinks on these chips so before you install your dandy new A64 system, take off your NB Cooler and replace the Factory thermal past with some AS-5. This is usually enough to keep the MB Cool enough to run the extra voltage. Placing Ram Sinks on your Southbridge and any other heat producing chip is never a bad idea either.

AGP/PCI Lock

The AGP and PCI Bus' are tied together on all motherboards that I know of. They are also derived from the FSB (Or HTT in the case of AMD) frequency by a divider. NVidia NForce chipsets have whats called a PCI/AGP Lock. This keeps your PCI and AGP Bus at a constant speed no matter what your HTT bus is. This is CRITICAL. If y our PCI bus is too fast, you WILL corrupt hard drive data. If your AGP Bus is too fast, you WILL have Video problems. Via Chipsts have been known to have Faulty PCI locks. This appears to be corrected in the KT800 Pro Chipset, but KT800 and below SHOW a PCI Lock in most bios's but it doesnt do much... This is a Primary reason why overclockers stay away from these boards.

On your Nforce or Via KT800Pro board you want this setting at 33Mhz if its listed as a PCI lock, or 66-67Mhz if its listed as a AGP Lock. Pushing this offers absolutely no benefit as the bandwidth provided by these frequencies is more than todays Hard Drives or AGP Video cards can use.
COOL N' QUIET
Disable this. This is a feature that will automatically UNDERCLOCK your system if it feels it doesnt need to run so fast.... WHo are "They" to tell us how fast out CPU should run?

Now.... What do we do with all this Information??? Start Overclocking of course.....

First Thing First... Letís see how fast our Processor can go.

Set your Memory Divider at its lowest setting. (Usually 100 or 133) This will give us a LOT of headroom to push out CPU.

Next, Drop your HTT Multiplier to 3x and your CPU Multiplier 1 Notch (If you have a 2 GHz CPU, drop your Multiplier down to 9x)


with these settings most AMD systems will boot and run at a 230HTT so go there first. Once you get into Windows, Run a 1Million run of SuperPi, and then a Prim95 Max heat test for about 10 Minutes. If it passes both of those, its time to go further.
Go 5 MHz at a Time and Repeat. During this we'll want to raise the VCore of our Processor to maintain stability. Once SuperPi and/or Prime95 fail, raise your VCore .05 Volts and Try again. Once you get to 1.7V and still Errors, Drop down 3 MHz and Try again.
Finally, if that fails, drop back down the 2 MHz we had left and call it a day. This is a Slow Time Consuming process, so have a few Mountain Dews and some chocolate bars handy.

Once your push your HTT bus back over 800 MHz (267HTT Bus) raise your Chipset Voltage up to 1.7

with any luck, you'll hit 260-280HTT Depending on your CPU.

Write this info down and then we move on to testing out Memory.
CPU TEMPS ADDDENDUM
As stated above, A64s are VERY efficient, there have been reports of outrageous overclocks using the stock AMD Heatsink. But I would still recommend a high quality Swiftech or Thermalright Unit. (Dee DavidHammocks HSF Guide for specifics)

Anyway, Standard Desktop chips should be kept under 55c in ALL cases. It should NOT be hard to keep then under 45-48c with good quality cooling. Running higher than that is a good indication that you have misapplied your HSF and/or AS-5 Remount.
Mobile chips are rated a bit higher, but there is still no reason to ever see temps higher than 55c. The lack of an IHS provides better contact with the Heatsink and itís very possible to keep temps at 45 and lower with quality cooling. Even with high overclocks.

Torture your Memory Next
Memory is usually the Culprit in holding back overclocks. Finding out the capabilities of what our memory can do is critical.

Drop your HTT bus back down to 200, and reset your Memory Divider to 1:1 (Usually "AUTO") Leave your CPU Multiplier at 9x (For a 10 Stock Multi) and let start out at 215 at Stock Timings, Bump VDimm up to 2.7v(Or +.1Volt)

The 2 tests you want to do here are SuperPi 1 Million and Memtest86 You'll need a Floppy disc or Bootable CD to run Memtest86 (Or if you have a DFI UT, there is a Modded BIOS available with Memtest built in)

Run 5 Passes of Memtest86, then boot into Windows and Run SuperPi. You wonít be fast, but SuperPi 1Million runs a LOT of numbers through your Memory. If all goes well, go up 5 MHz at a time until one starts to error.
Thatís where we need to start loosening the timings.
Go up .5 on Cast Latency, 1 on RAS to CAS Delay, 1 on RAS Precharge, and 2 on Cycle Time (Tras) and Repeat these tests. Depending on your memory,
you may want to loosen them more, but I would suggest keeping them under 3-4-4-11 if at all possible. If youíre using Memory Other than TCCD based, donít be afraid to bump your Memory voltage more. Most modules will take 2.9-3.0 Volts just fine and BH-5 has been known to go as high as 3.3 to 3.5v!


Once you've found your Memoryís max speed, this is where we need to do some math. Most likely thereís a sizeable gap between what your CPU can do and what your Memory can do. Thatís OK.... Thatís why we went down a Notch or 2 on our CPU Multiplier testing.

Lets say your CPU went to 260 Stable with a 1x drop in your Multi, Not bad.... a 340Mhz O/C on a stock 2Ghz chip... but your memory only went to 230 before you had to go to slow in your Timings. Thatís OK.... Drop the HTT down to 230 and bring your Multiplier back to stock speed (10 xs in our example) you should have a Rock Solid 300Mhz overclock on your hands.

If the Gap between your Memory and CPU is so high, you canít get to your Max CPU Speed with your Stock Multiplier, we may need to run a higher Divider on our Memory.
If we're talking 30+ MHz base difference.... You should probably drop your Memory Divider down to 166 and use your Max CPU Speed we figured out. Less than 30 MHz and you'll probably get better performance running 1:1 at your Memory speed. I say this because we'll be losing memory speed at our best settings at that point. Only use a Higher Divider IF your CPU speed will bring your Memory speed to within 2-5 MHz of your MAX Memory Speed. 240HTT X10 = 2400Mhz, Divided By 11 (166) brings out Memory down to 218Mhz If out MAX speed as 236, we're Giving away Memory bandwidth for no reason. However, if your Max CPU bus is 260, then we get this 260x10 = 2600 /11 = 236.
See how that works? Now out Memory is maxed AND out CPU is maxed....
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Old 09-04-2005, 03:43 PM   #8
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New edited in
For ram tweaking n' understanding

What's CAS, tRP, and all those others mean
Guide # 1
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Old 09-04-2005, 03:56 PM   #9
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can add a part on PSUs(esp during selection) and stuff to take note of in yr sticky??
thx!!
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Old 09-04-2005, 04:17 PM   #10
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can add a part on PSUs(esp during selection) and stuff to take note of in yr sticky??
thx!!
Ok upz as requested

Which PSU for me?
Guide # 1
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Old 10-04-2005, 10:01 PM   #11
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got it!! thx a lot bro!!
btw i wonder wat psu i shd get if i need one that can supply abt 3.5vdimm for my rams...
the mobo is nf3.
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Old 10-04-2005, 10:56 PM   #12
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No other then OCZ Powersteam 520
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Old 12-04-2005, 12:48 PM   #13
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how abt the verudium lite series? can comment?

wats diff in pro n lite series? dun c much diff btwn them

Last edited by _stAnz_; 12-04-2005 at 01:02 PM..
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Old 25-07-2005, 02:42 AM   #14
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wow... thx for those websites..
still searching for one on centrino overclocking..
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Old 25-07-2005, 09:27 AM   #15
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wow... thx for those websites..
still searching for one on centrino overclocking..
U can use clockgen if u are o/cing it via a Laptop (Not much room of increasement thro)
Anyway here's what your Dothan can do on a Desktop
http://forums.hardwarezone.com/showthread.php?t=1067381
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