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Old 08-07-2010, 12:08 PM   #16
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Go ahead get a belkin one. They will replace the stuff damaged by surge up to 10k iirc.
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Old 08-07-2010, 12:33 PM   #17
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The reason why I'm asking this question is that I want to leave the computer in sleep mode so that it can wake up to record TV programs.
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Old 08-07-2010, 12:56 PM   #18
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I leave my PC on almost daily, maybe off once or twice a week, so far so good without surge protector...but I guess it's always good to have one, maybe I should get one soon.
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Old 08-07-2010, 01:33 PM   #19
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Other than the lightning part.

If your appliance short circuit, without using surge protector, your house main circuit breaker might tripped, fuse blown or if old circuit breaker, might even cause damage to other appliances.

By plugging your appliance on the surge protector, the damage will just stop at the multisocket strip surge protector.
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Old 08-07-2010, 02:27 PM   #20
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There is a long assay about lighting surge, i think lighting surge is bit differnet from surge itself.
Power from pub to the hdb(for example)till the home circuit breaker(coming in) which is being taken care of by them, let talk about the surge in the home itself.

Surge is not high current but a rush of current, when an equipment suddenly turn on or shut down it may create a interfernce next to the other when it is already on state on the same line let say a mutli-extension cord.
Just example,
1)when pub service your block for electrical maintanenae and shut down for 2 hours, they also request people to remove the power cord if possible cause when the block power turn on they may afraid of power surge.
2)when factory power failure, the normal procedure is to turn off all the power to prevent surge when power recover.
Though both are unlike to happen, is just a caution against surge current.

I not against using surge protector , i got 1 myself since it just a couple of dollar different but i just don't ready bother about the insurence it claim to cover.A lot of my customer in semiconduct don't really use surge protector extension cord even.
My point is if one fine day your psu catch fire(when no one at home) due to heat is not due to whether you using surge protector or not, it is because the poor low grade psu not able to shut down itself due to overheat.

Last edited by cool,man; 08-07-2010 at 02:30 PM..
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Old 08-07-2010, 02:56 PM   #21
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Other than the lightning part.

If your appliance short circuit, without using surge protector, your house main circuit breaker might tripped, fuse blown or if old circuit breaker, might even cause damage to other appliances.

By plugging your appliance on the surge protector, the damage will just stop at the multisocket strip surge protector.

Serious question : Are you sure the ordinary Belkin surge protector can protect against excess current due to short circuit? Tell me which component the Belkin surge protector has that can do this? As far as I can tell, there are no circuit breakers in the cheap Belkin strips.

If not sure, better not anyhow claim that surge protector can do the same function as circuit breaker, especially when safety is at stake.

I have no training myself, so I want to get clarification, but what I have learnt is the circuit breaker and surge protector are different, but I could be wrong also.

Last edited by limster; 08-07-2010 at 02:59 PM..
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Old 08-07-2010, 04:30 PM   #22
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Serious question : Are you sure the ordinary Belkin surge protector can protect against excess current due to short circuit? Tell me which component the Belkin surge protector has that can do this? As far as I can tell, there are no circuit breakers in the cheap Belkin strips.

If not sure, better not anyhow claim that surge protector can do the same function as circuit breaker, especially when safety is at stake.

I have no training myself, so I want to get clarification, but what I have learnt is the circuit breaker and surge protector are different, but I could be wrong also.
I know what can do the same function as circuit breaker.

It's called a fuse.

Singapore follows BS 1363, meaning all our plugs except 2-pin ones (which can't be used anyway without 'cheating') are fused.
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Old 08-07-2010, 05:12 PM   #23
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I've experience before. Previously my iron was plugged directly to a wall socket. Whenever I over filled the water, the house main circuit breaker will tripped. When I turn back on the circuit breaker switch, there's always one of the appliance plug fuse blow (those connect directly to wall plug). But no fuse blown from all equipments in my room which are originally plugged into surge protector multi plug strips.

From then onwards, all appliances in my house are plugged into surge protector strips. No more blown fuse.

You might not believe. But I believe it may do some good to my equipments.


One more thing.
Some surge protectors have a line-conditioning system for filtering out "line noise," smaller fluctuations in electrical current. Basic surge protectors with line-conditioning use a fairly simple system. On its way to the power strip outlet, the hot wire passes through a toroidal choke coil. The choke is a just ring of magnetic material, wrapped with wire -- a basic electromagnet. The ups and downs of the passing current in the hot wire charge the electromagnet, causing it to emit electromagnetic forces that smooth out the small increases and decreases in current. This "conditioned" current is more stable, and so easier on your computer (or other electronic device).


That's why I never experience humming sound from my PC power supply and my hifi power amp.
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Old 08-07-2010, 09:06 PM   #24
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Surge is not high current but a rush of current, when an equipment suddenly turn on or shut down it may create a interfernce next to the other when it is already on state on the same line let say a mutli-extension cord.
Just example,
If a surge is a rush of current, then voltage drops. But a 120 volt surge protector, according to manufacturer specs, does nothing until that 120 volts *increases* above 330 volts. IOW the surge protector remains inert during a current surge. Does nothing. And current surges do no damage.

Many using word association will confuse that surge with another surge from a USB port surge. USB ports cut off power when a USB device draws too much power. And that also is equivalent to a surge that creates 6000 volts inside an appliance? So we shold put surge protectors on USB ports? Word association is how junk science conclusions are obtained.

Surge protectors are for significant voltages that occur in microseconds. That surge overwhelms protection inside every appliance. If that energy is inside the house, then nothing will stop it. That type of surge goes hunting for earth destructively via appliances. Protection from a surge that can actually harm computer, furnace, and bathroom GFCIs must be earthed before it enters the building. That has no relationship to current demanded by a powered on appliance.

So what do plug-in protctors do? Most every fire department has seen this problem:
http://www.hanford.gov/rl/?page=556&parent=554
http://www.ddxg.net/old/surge_protectors.htm
http://www.zerosurge.com/HTML/movs.html
http://tinyurl.com/3x73ol is entitled "Surge Protector Fires"
http://www3.cw56.com/news/articles/local/BO63312/
http://www.nmsu.edu/~safety/news/les...tectorfire.htm
http://www.pennsburgfireco.com/fullstory.php?58339

Just another reason why informed homeowners earth one 'whole house' protector so that a sleeping computer is not at risk. Plug-in protectors (and that sleeping computer) require protection only provided by one 'whole house' protector. Or would you rather wait to see if it can also happen to you?

Next post deals with another myth promoted when one fails to first read what the manufacturer says in fine print.
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Old 08-07-2010, 09:09 PM   #25
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Go ahead get a belkin one. They will replace the stuff damaged by surge up to 10k iirc.
One should read the fine print before recommending anything. For example, an APC warranty said a protector from any other manufacturer in the house voids their warranty. Fine print is chock full of such exemptions when selling a profit center to people who do not first read.

They are not selling effective protection or insurance. They are selling a profit center - also called a scam. To have not read that fine print means one recommends by believing lies in a sales brochure. First read the facts.

How good is that Belkin warranty? Newsman on 10 Sept 2002 in "SONY TiVo SVR-2000":
> I got a Belkin surge protector with phone line protection soley for Tivo purposes.
> Yet my Tivo's modem still failed. And the '$20,000 connected devices warranty' did
> not help me. I jumped through many hoops, including finding the original recept
> for the surge protector (just under a year old) and I sent my surge protector to
> Belkin (paid for shipping), and was denied my warranty. They gave me a ton of crap,
> including that it was null and void b/c the Tivo was also connected to the coax
> line for cable (this was not mentioned as a thing in the warranty that can nullify
> it). Eventually it boiled down to a line in the warranty that said "Belkin at
> it's sole discretion can reject any claim for any reason".

People make unsubstantiates claims such as "Belkin will filter power" Or "it sacrifices itself to save my computer". Or it will stop damage from short circuits (which is the job of circuit breakers and does not cause appliance damage).

Plug-in protectors have a history of even creating house fires - or that apartment building in Boston. What do you think happens when a protector rated at hundreds of joules must somehow absorb hundreds of thousands of joule? But then means reading facts and numbers before knowing anything. Not endorsing claims based in hearsay and advertising myths.
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Old 08-07-2010, 09:17 PM   #26
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Carrerfour suntec selling at this price



last i saw less than 5 sets left
i think someone is gonna kill me
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Old 09-07-2010, 08:34 AM   #27
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May I know what surge protector you use ?

I've experience before. Previously my iron was plugged directly to a wall socket. Whenever I over filled the water, the house main circuit breaker will tripped. When I turn back on the circuit breaker switch, there's always one of the appliance plug fuse blow (those connect directly to wall plug). But no fuse blown from all equipments in my room which are originally plugged into surge protector multi plug strips.

From then onwards, all appliances in my house are plugged into surge protector strips. No more blown fuse.

You might not believe. But I believe it may do some good to my equipments.


One more thing.
Some surge protectors have a line-conditioning system for filtering out "line noise," smaller fluctuations in electrical current. Basic surge protectors with line-conditioning use a fairly simple system. On its way to the power strip outlet, the hot wire passes through a toroidal choke coil. The choke is a just ring of magnetic material, wrapped with wire -- a basic electromagnet. The ups and downs of the passing current in the hot wire charge the electromagnet, causing it to emit electromagnetic forces that smooth out the small increases and decreases in current. This "conditioned" current is more stable, and so easier on your computer (or other electronic device).


That's why I never experience humming sound from my PC power supply and my hifi power amp.
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Old 09-07-2010, 10:12 AM   #28
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Wow

One should read the fine print before recommending anything. For example, an APC warranty said a protector from any other manufacturer in the house voids their warranty. Fine print is chock full of such exemptions when selling a profit center to people who do not first read.

They are not selling effective protection or insurance. They are selling a profit center - also called a scam. To have not read that fine print means one recommends by believing lies in a sales brochure. First read the facts.

How good is that Belkin warranty? Newsman on 10 Sept 2002 in "SONY TiVo SVR-2000":
> I got a Belkin surge protector with phone line protection soley for Tivo purposes.
> Yet my Tivo's modem still failed. And the '$20,000 connected devices warranty' did
> not help me. I jumped through many hoops, including finding the original recept
> for the surge protector (just under a year old) and I sent my surge protector to
> Belkin (paid for shipping), and was denied my warranty. They gave me a ton of crap,
> including that it was null and void b/c the Tivo was also connected to the coax
> line for cable (this was not mentioned as a thing in the warranty that can nullify
> it). Eventually it boiled down to a line in the warranty that said "Belkin at
> it's sole discretion can reject any claim for any reason".

People make unsubstantiates claims such as "Belkin will filter power" Or "it sacrifices itself to save my computer". Or it will stop damage from short circuits (which is the job of circuit breakers and does not cause appliance damage).

Plug-in protectors have a history of even creating house fires - or that apartment building in Boston. What do you think happens when a protector rated at hundreds of joules must somehow absorb hundreds of thousands of joule? But then means reading facts and numbers before knowing anything. Not endorsing claims based in hearsay and advertising myths.
This deserves a sticky.
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Old 09-07-2010, 11:07 AM   #29
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I used to switch off my PC when I go out. But now, I want to leave it on. Do I need a surge protector ?
Don't make sense. You mean if you switch on your PC when you are at home, you don't need a surge protector? If you really want to leave your PC on when you are out, then a UPS makes more sense. Preferably one that can auto shut down your PC if the UPS runs out of power should the source tripped. Surge protector cannot do that.

I using the APC BR800I, can specify how many minutes before total power loss to shut down the PC when I'm not at home. My house tripped a few times every year (esp during thunderstorms) and I run my PC near 24/7 so UPS is important. Their support so far seems pretty good. The UPS behaving funny recently. Made a report to APC support and they actually call me back to chase for an update on the status after giving their advice the first time.

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Old 09-07-2010, 11:37 AM   #30
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May I know what surge protector you use ?
I use both Belkin & APC ones.
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