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Old 29-04-2009, 10:00 AM   #661
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What he says is true.

I dont see anything wrong with his attitude, you might be misunderstanding his intentions....
Hopeless..........
dun spoil thread leh.

So I assume what he says is 100% true while what I am saying are all nonsense?

Then there's nothing to share or talk about.
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Old 29-04-2009, 10:03 AM   #662
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mm..collectors with sharp knifes having a heated debate online..


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Old 29-04-2009, 10:29 AM   #663
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My take on sharpening has always been that it is about maintenance. I like sharp knives. A dull blade will cut and hurt you a lot worst than a dull one. There's been many occasions I've been cut by my knife and I didn't feel a thing, only to realise it when I stained my shirt. . Some find sharpening therapeutic (even spritual) but I guess to each his own. There's the cheap and effective way or the more extravagant way. I think there is generally a bit too much pre-occupation on the tools but too little focus on the techniques. You can have a 200 dollar stone but if you can't sharpen freehand for nuts it's still going to be an expensive paperweight. I do however understand that people generally want the best that they can afford. For those new to sharpening knives an expensive stone is not all that necessary. I've been using those so called "cheap wet market" stones for years and they've worked just fine. In case you're wondering those butchers and fishmongers use their knives more than any of us average folks do in a whole month (heck maybe the whole year). These stones may be cheap but they work and if you are reprofiling a blade these stones (silicon carbide, SiC) will actually work a whole lot better than any Japanese stone which are composed of mainly silica as the cutting agent, i.e. sand. As I proceeded into the hobby of knives I did pick up a few other methods such as the sand paper method and stropping. No I'm not a knife expert and I don't claim to be.. But the following is what has worked for me.
Cheap wet market stones can only do so much, re profiling and sharpen edge to maximize slicing. To what you have said, I agree. But if you wanna get an edge that can slice hair, then it will take more than that cheap stone and need consistent grit to do it.

The Japanese stones are more consistent in grit size and cuts all the time.

For you and many others, you may not need to excel your current achievement. But I seek improve and to achieve the sharpest edge humanly possible.

I have seen videos with knives that can literally slice hair into half or simply splicing the hair. I want to reach this stage of an edge that can push cut into anything.

But I guess it's pointless to most of you.

Sandpaper Sharpening
In this method a piece of sandpaper is mounted with spray adhesive on a flat piece of material (i prefer a small piece of glass, 1feet X 4inch). I usually use 400-500 grit to start and proceed to 800 and later 1200. Use wet and dry (black/green)... Glass paper are useless. Most of my knives never have much of a chance to dull as I am usually very disciplined with sharpening so most times its 800 and then 1200. To make sure you are getting every bit of the edge mark it with permanent marker and sharpen the knife. That way you'll know if you miss a spot as the section still has ink. The one question many want to know is when do i change side... Equal no. of strokes is the usual advice but I usually sharpen until I form a burr on the other side as the metal curves/ bends as I sharpen. You can feel this by running your fingernail on the opposite side you are sharpening, it feels rough. That's the time I flip the knife over to "knock off" the burr by sharpening the other side. Repeat until you get the desired sharpness you want. A piece of sandpaper will probably make 2 to 3 good sharpening stone/ surface and they're a heck lot cheaper than those stones you see sold online. A tip... Go slow, keep a good angle and use minimal pressure. The weight of the knife plus a bit more to keep the knife on it's path is generally enough. Cheap and packs into my strong box easily... Practice on mummy's/ wife's kitchen knives first. That's what I did.
This is my current method. Sandpaper, But I end with 1500.

Stropping
If you want a polished edge after sharpening a good strop is what you need. Glue a strip of leather belt (wrong side up, leather must be raw, untanned, unvarnished) on a piece of wood, go to a hardware store and buy rubbing compound (also known as automotive compound). Spread it on the leather surface thinly. Proceed as previously but instead of pushing the edge away, draw it towards you. A couple of swipes on each side will knock off any micro-serrations to give a polished edge. If you prefer to buy a strop theres a shop at golder mile complex that sells them (basement), they sell them to barbers as they stock salon stuff.
I strop on a felt cloth.
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Old 29-04-2009, 11:27 AM   #664
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My take on sharpening ... to send it to a pro.
you got PM
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Old 29-04-2009, 01:48 PM   #665
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you got PM
You can get untanned leather at Spotlight cut to size and use contact cement (glue sniffers best friend) to stick it onto a piece of scrap wood. My choice though is leather belts... Cheap and it works. Like I said, an alternative is to just get a strop at Golden Mile. These however are not fixed strops but you can adapt by stretching and nailing/ screwing it down onto a piece of wood or if you're confident use it on its own. There are few videos on YouTube to guide you.
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Old 29-04-2009, 01:51 PM   #666
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You can get untanned leather at Spotlight cut to size and use contact cement (glue sniffers best friend) to stick it onto a piece of scrap wood. My choice though is leather belts... Cheap and it works. Like I said, an alternative is to just get a strop at Golden Mile. These however are not fixed strops but you can adapt by stretching and nailing/ screwing it down onto a piece of wood or if you're confident use it on its own. There are few videos on YouTube to guide you.
yea thanks. i roughly know how to do those things but i need the raw material.

i heard magazine paper with autosol strop works for cheapo too.

disclaimer: i nv try before.

Last edited by i_got_a_question_to_ask; 29-04-2009 at 03:26 PM..
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Old 29-04-2009, 01:55 PM   #667
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the cat is welly offensive about his preferences~
don't argue orleady can~ all of chiu have knife.. welly dangerous
if chiu haf short fuse, better don't collect knife..
less argueing more knife collecting and sharpening..

Last edited by viix; 29-04-2009 at 02:08 PM..
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Old 29-04-2009, 02:01 PM   #668
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Cheap wet market stones can only do so much, re profiling and sharpen edge to maximize slicing. To what you have said, I agree. But if you wanna get an edge that can slice hair, then it will take more than that cheap stone and need consistent grit to do it.

The Japanese stones are more consistent in grit size and cuts all the time.

For you and many others, you may not need to excel your current achievement. But I seek improve and to achieve the sharpest edge humanly possible.

I have seen videos with knives that can literally slice hair into half or simply splicing the hair. I want to reach this stage of an edge that can push cut into anything.

But I guess it's pointless to most of you.



This is my current method. Sandpaper, But I end with 1500.



I strop on a felt cloth.
I'm curious about something though... What is it you are planning to sharpen? The type of knife and blade steel I mean... I'd love tp see some results. May even get me one of those stones too if I can see a discernible difference. If you are talking about Cutlerylover's video in which he whittled a strand of hair I think he uses an Edgepro Apex.

If you are stropping with felt cloth I think you may as well skip it totally. All you are doing is removing surface oxide (unlikely) and grease from your hand (more likely) through polishing. It's akin to using a handkerchief to polish up a knife. Cloth, cotton, microfibre or whatever has no cutting agent or abrasive. With no compund it doesn't work. An alternative you may use is cardboard. The clay content in the cardboard actually does smoothen out the micro serrations.
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Old 29-04-2009, 04:38 PM   #669
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http://i37.tinypic.com/2ezjtxd.jpg

from left: Officer Kurki, military combat knife(unknow if u know please tell mi), mv series knife, cold steel master tanto and rambo 2 first blood knife.

(Officer Kurki-Nepalese officer gave my dad during combine overseas training than passed to me )
(Military combat knife- unknow given by dad but he cant remember where iszit from)
(MV Series knife- given by my dad senior when his in commando. No longer in production as MV culterly focus on kitchen knife only)
(Cold Steel master tanto- Realy impressed by the video demo on the knife shown on cold steel website cost me a bomb)
(Rambo 2 first blood- big and nice! From SIG arms many years ago looking hard for the rambo 1,3 & 4 series)
Hi,
Not sure if anyone has replied your question. But the second knife from the left is made in Thailand and used to be very commonly sold here in the early 80s in the shops along Beach road. It's not very good quality and if I'm not wrong should be quite heavy too. They used to sell for very little as far as knives like these go, I think $30 - $40 during that time.

Hope this helps.
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Old 29-04-2009, 05:49 PM   #670
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Anyway, for those guys in here that is trying to ask that TS in ClubSnap Kitchen Samurai thread @ http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/showt...418402&page=19 some questions, that threadstarter has de-registered from that forum and moved his entire thread to SGShoot @ http://www.sgshoot.com/forums/showth...?t=5319&page=6

So you might want to ask him again at the new forum thread. That TS really quite knowledgeable on knives, sharpening and stuff.
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Old 29-04-2009, 06:08 PM   #671
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I'm curious about something though... What is it you are planning to sharpen? The type of knife and blade steel I mean... I'd love tp see some results. May even get me one of those stones too if I can see a discernible difference. If you are talking about Cutlerylover's video in which he whittled a strand of hair I think he uses an Edgepro Apex.

If you are stropping with felt cloth I think you may as well skip it totally. All you are doing is removing surface oxide (unlikely) and grease from your hand (more likely) through polishing. It's akin to using a handkerchief to polish up a knife. Cloth, cotton, microfibre or whatever has no cutting agent or abrasive. With no compund it doesn't work. An alternative you may use is cardboard. The clay content in the cardboard actually does smoothen out the micro serrations.
Free hand sharpening is able to acheive it. I have said enough. I'm offensive when I think that people are being illogical when they question my choice.

It's not that I'm ****ing buying natural whetstones. It's just synthethic for god's sake. I'm not spending hundreds of dollars on a piece of relic which I am not using !

I'm looking for better consistency, and proven to work ! WTF, tell me that shipping those stones are expensive and I'm ****ing paying more than his precious kasumi !

If his Kasumi can ****ing produce results, even though I'm paying more, I will buy it. No reviews and anything expect me to believe?

Pardon me, but i'm skeptical.

edit: I think enough is enough. Contributing to this thread seems pointless enough.
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Old 29-04-2009, 08:29 PM   #672
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Free hand sharpening is able to acheive it. I have said enough. I'm offensive when I think that people are being illogical when they question my choice.

It's not that I'm ****ing buying natural whetstones. It's just synthethic for god's sake. I'm not spending hundreds of dollars on a piece of relic which I am not using !

I'm looking for better consistency, and proven to work ! WTF, tell me that shipping those stones are expensive and I'm ****ing paying more than his precious kasumi !

If his Kasumi can ****ing produce results, even though I'm paying more, I will buy it. No reviews and anything expect me to believe?

Pardon me, but i'm skeptical.

edit: I think enough is enough. Contributing to this thread seems pointless enough.
Sorry you took offence bro... I don't think I mentioned anything about those Kasumi stones. Heck I have not the slightest interest in those. A Japanese stone is a Japanese stone to me. I'm ignorant on such things. All I wanted was to know the results that you got using them because if they are good I may consider getting one too. In no way am I questioning your choice and please keep your contribution coming. Small issues should not get in the way of good discussion. There is a lot that we can learn from each other. I'm learning new things everyday too.

edit: If any part of my post was offensive to you I apologise.

Last edited by Lonerider; 29-04-2009 at 08:30 PM.. Reason: add...
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Old 29-04-2009, 08:38 PM   #673
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yea thanks. i roughly know how to do those things but i need the raw material.

i heard magazine paper with autosol strop works for cheapo too.

disclaimer: i nv try before.
Most paper has a certain amount of clay in them but I've never heard about using magazine paper. Cardboard, yes... You can give it a try. Autosol has polishing compound in it. You can tell just by feeling it between your thumb and index finger. I don't polish my knives with autosol though. All my knives are stainless and quite good quality ones too. A light coat of oil has been sufficient for me. I also store them in an aluminium box with silica gel to keep the humidity to a minimum. As my collection grows I may one day invest in a proper safe.

Magazine paper? I'll try and search online for that. To be honest I'm not sure. Those papers seems glossy and this may indicate a kind of coating or treatment had been applied to them. If you use cardboard theres no need for any compounds.
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Old 29-04-2009, 08:57 PM   #674
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Free hand sharpening is able to acheive it. I have said enough. I'm offensive when I think that people are being illogical when they question my choice.

It's not that I'm ****ing buying natural whetstones. It's just synthethic for god's sake. I'm not spending hundreds of dollars on a piece of relic which I am not using !

I'm looking for better consistency, and proven to work ! WTF, tell me that shipping those stones are expensive and I'm ****ing paying more than his precious kasumi !

If his Kasumi can ****ing produce results, even though I'm paying more, I will buy it. No reviews and anything expect me to believe?

Pardon me, but i'm skeptical.

edit: I think enough is enough. Contributing to this thread seems pointless enough.


Sorry you took offence bro... I don't think I mentioned anything about those Kasumi stones. Heck I have not the slightest interest in those. A Japanese stone is a Japanese stone to me. I'm ignorant on such things. All I wanted was to know the results that you got using them because if they are good I may consider getting one too. In no way am I questioning your choice and please keep your contribution coming. Small issues should not get in the way of good discussion. There is a lot that we can learn from each other. I'm learning new things everyday too.

edit: If any part of my post was offensive to you I apologise.
He is talking about me not you.... but I really dun see why he has to act the way he did......
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Old 29-04-2009, 09:10 PM   #675
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He is talking about me not you.... but I really dun see why he has to act the way he did......
You sure? Cos he quoted my reply... Nevermind, lets get back on topic. My new knive is coming tomorrow! Stay tuned for pics... From my lousy camera phone again. Sigh...
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