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Old 14-08-2015, 02:05 PM   #7996
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Anyone have triple laminated non-kitchen use, fixed blades in Japanese tradition? My limited knowledge only include Murray Carter's knives.

Looking for 4" blade length, 3 3/4" handle, drop point and decent belly.

Have a good weekend. Cheers!
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Old 14-08-2015, 02:19 PM   #7997
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Anyone have triple laminated non-kitchen use, fixed blades in Japanese tradition? My limited knowledge only include Murray Carter's knives.

Looking for 4" blade length, 3 3/4" handle, drop point and decent belly. Not sure if 150usd enough.

Have a good weekend. Cheers!

Last edited by Dr Hunt; 14-08-2015 at 02:20 PM.. Reason: Repost.
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Old 14-08-2015, 05:00 PM   #7998
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Anyone have triple laminated non-kitchen use, fixed blades in Japanese tradition? My limited knowledge only include Murray Carter's knives.

Looking for 4" blade length, 3 3/4" handle, drop point and decent belly. Not sure if 150usd enough.

Have a good weekend. Cheers!
1. CAS (Claudio Sobral) hunter, san mai steel (stainless cladding) with beautiful lamination line, high carbon core and razor sharp. super ergonomic micarta handle, stainless guard, domed pins and beautifully tooled sheath.

USD625 via paypal. I'll take less if you want to close quickly by this weekend.



USD150 for a laminated blade is challenging (especially stainless clad) but maybe $250-300 is ok - I've seen a relatively unknown knifemaker selling fixed blades with laminated blades there (look at the for sale by knifemaker's sub-forum) - can't remember this name.

Otherwise, you can try finnish/Danish/Swedish/Norwegian puukkos - they also like laminated steel.

Oh, maybe you can try Takeshi Saji for Japanese style blades, but also closer to $300, he uses suminagashi Damascus cladded blades with a stainless or high carbon core as well.

Last edited by vespaguy; 14-08-2015 at 08:17 PM..
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Old 14-08-2015, 08:19 PM   #7999
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Nice shot of a working knife, Den. It's a unique design with the short khukuri-like blade and long handle.

The KH Gurkha Jungle, apparently SPGC's 2009 issue non-ceremonial khukuri has a bit of fanboy appeal for me
I vote parang over khukri any day and twice on weekends
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Old 14-08-2015, 08:44 PM   #8000
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Vespaguy, thanks for your great offer. Its a beautiful beast of a knife. Quite a far bit out of my budget though. Haha.

Saji TS-45 Kurobi looks neat. Got to check if Japanese knife direct dot com is reputable.

I was considering Helle knives, but decided not to get a scandi grind blade anytime soon.

P.S the pc and phone keep showing problems with reply posts.
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Old 14-08-2015, 08:50 PM   #8001
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How many votes can a guy vote on knives?

Why do you vote multiple times for parang? I'm sure you have some exotic parangs in the collection.

The parang I know are sold on outdoor dynamics dot com, made in Msia. I remember reading someone mention here that khukuri or knives with cutting edge above 12 inch are not allowed by customs. Is it true?
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Old 14-08-2015, 08:50 PM   #8002
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I vote parang over khukri any day and twice on weekends
I'll pack a scimitar if I'm riding a camel instead of mountain bikes
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Old 15-08-2015, 06:32 AM   #8003
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How many votes can a guy vote on knives?

Why do you vote multiple times for parang? I'm sure you have some exotic parangs in the collection.

The parang I know are sold on outdoor dynamics dot com, made in Msia. I remember reading someone mention here that khukuri or knives with cutting edge above 12 inch are not allowed by customs. Is it true?
parang - indigenous, comfortable handle, blade is optimized for type of cutting (no hardwoods, soft-medium woods in tropical jungle, bush, vines, green), total weight of typical parang is 600-700gms, light enough to carry whole day and to cut for long sessions, non-recurved blade, makes the sweet spot bigger and easier to sharpen, wooden sheath, doesn't require you to wear a belt, usually attached with a rope (which allows you to shift positions when climbing, river crossing etc)....

khukri - most of the khuks I see everyone clamours for is the typical british service style with a pronounced recurve/bend in the blade. If you use your long blades for utility work, you may find that this is not a utility friendly shape, limiting the sweet spot, it's also heavier due to the thicker stock, difficult to sharpen due to the blade shape, the flared handle with pronounced edge is not palm friendly for extended period, belt worn ....

I guess whatever floats your boat I just prefer parang.

There are many types and quality of parang - it's not easy to track down the good ones, I am still trying to. It appears easier in INdonesia and Brunei than in Malaysia. You should be able to speak the local language.

If you want one for simple yard work/junglecraft, just get the Bidor parang from Malaysia - but you need to handpick the best - there are many different grades of Bidor parang too. What I dislike from the Bidor parang is the plastic handles - tough but uncomfortable and lacks 'art'. Wooden or horn handles are a must for me. I also avoid recurved parangs - I need blades that have a slight upwards curve (Borneo natives prefer this) or straight (peninsular Malaysia natives like this shape). A parang Melayu with exotic handles and wood would be nice...provided they have longer pinned tangs.

Here's a picture of a parang (not your typical duku since it has a belly and a golok tip) forged by a smithy in Brunei (which is a great place to get parangs as they are not meant for tourists) - thin blade, good heat treat and balance and a very aromatic sheath. Nice simpeh (bindings) too. Wish I had it


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Old 16-08-2015, 06:48 PM   #8004
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I know there are some of you who are discerning and know exactly what you want. Some who have dabbled custom makes for the longest time. Others who are new and are seeking to find out more - there's a ton of marketing BS out there, pretty pics, dramatic pics catering to the new and curious.

I thought the steak analogy used by the poster (I extracted this from BF) is noteworthy:

So what do I think.

I think matching Luong's super quenched 52100 to Vanadis 4E is hard. They're both equally capable of handling rough and dirty work. They're both hard, strong and tough. Where the Vanadis 4E chipped, the 52100 dented and rolled but didn't fracture. Vanadis 4E has higher wear resistance but at a significantly higher cost. There are tradeoffs and pros and cons with both.

I can more easily compare the two knives as whole packages. I think Luong's knife made of 52100 with his heat treatment giving 61 HRC is better than the ZT. The only reason it looks a little worse than the ZT is because Luong's knife is thinner behind the edge with a more acute edge angle. It did some really hard things with not a lot of material to support it at the edge.

His knife did not get uncomfortable at all during the test. Unlike with the ZT where I had to take a break due to hand fatigue and soreness, I plowed right through all the same stuff with Luong's knife in one day.

Luong's knife came with a better sheath.
Luong's knife is lighter.
Importantly, Luong's knife cut things much easier.

And in the words of one of my coworkers, Luong's knife has soul. It's hard to describe what that means. It looks handmade, like someone took a piece of themselves and made a knife with it, but that doesn't really describe it accurately because there are a ton of careless and crappy handmade knives out there. I guess it's more along the lines of your mom's or grandmother's food versus some restaurant. It may not be perfect, but it's made with a genuine desire to please, and it does, more so than most other knives I've held. Actually, a pretty fair analogy is that the Vanadis 4E is some prime kobe beef and Aldo's 52100 is some grade A prime Nebraska beef. Zero Tolerance is like Ruth's Chris steakhouse and Luong is your grandfather who's been grilling some steaks on a fire pit for years. Take your pick, both will be great, but I bet your grandfather grilling up some Nebraska steaks will be more satisfying.

I came in from the test and have been sharpening it for about an hour already. I took a break from that to post these pictures and my thoughts. Most of the damage, minus that one large dent, is already gone. Actually, most of the damage was gone in about 15 minutes.

I'll be back with how long it took to fully repair the edge and get it cleaned up.
When you buy your knives, use them and don't get caught up with fads.

ps: that's why I still like my parangs over any khukri
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Old 16-08-2015, 07:07 PM   #8005
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here's another post that I extracted from the Green Forum, something that makes customs more interesting than prodos, steel, technique and design notwithstanding.

It's about Tom Mayo, a custom knifemaker from Hawaii, and is penned by himself. He's known for the high fit and finish of this folders, many of which are non-flippers He doesn't take orders, so the secondary market is where you have to hunt for his folders.

Back in '71, I came to Hawaii at the invitation of my good buddy Lee Casso.......He had a scored a funky old quanset hut up in Pupukea for $50 a month. There were five of us, $10 each!!!!
I stayed for three months and fell in love with the place; so naturally I came back the next winter.
This time I stayed longer............for the rest of my life! After being here for about 5 months I met this wonderful girl from Arizona and the rest is history........Three kids later and I was no longer a nomadic surf troll.
I looked around and decided that making surfboards would be the best lifestyle choice for what I loved to do, go surfing, and so I got into the industry a little at a time. By the time the decade had come to an end I had my own glassing factory with six guys working for me.
Things were a little slow in Jan and Feb, every year, so I decided I needed a hobby...........and on a lot of days, on my walk down to surf Pipeline, I looked in on my buddy Allan Wilkenson, who is one of the best furniture makers in the state.
That was the beginning of my long journey to where I am now. I did that for a few years and finally decided furniture was too complicated and time consuming and began to look for another hobby, something I could start and finish in a few days.
I always loved knives...........every since I was a kid.........My grandfather made me one from a file when I was about 12, and I kept it until it was lost in a big fire at my surfboard shop in '78.
I kept looking at the custom knives in the gun magazines, wishing I had enough money to get one (Loveless drop points were about $175 back then) and finally started making a few on my wood working machines. Simple, flat ground hunting knives.

After a while, I took the plunge and started selling off my wood working equipment and getting a few machines that were knife specific. One of the first was a Square Wheel Belt Sander........One speed!!! Man that thing went fast.......got the metal hot in three or four seconds.....it really wasnt the best way to do it.
So for the next year I made knives, very clumsily.......and along the way someone told me that Glenn Hornby had the best deals on belts and a few other things........So I gave him a call and started ordering stuff........and I threw in a million questions every time I called. He was very gracious to help me the best he could over the phone, and after a while he asked if I wanted to come over and hang out the week before the Anaheim Show (Dan Delavan's Yearly SoCal show which later become Blade West).......that was a no brainer and next thing I knew I was in a real knifemakers shop........learning real knifemaking stuff! (At that time there were no other knifemakers in Hawaii, LA was the closest place to get any real info)
Understand that Glenn was firmly entrenched in the SoCal knife philosophy of the day......LOVELESS was king, and you did everything the way Bob did it......No kidding, every shop he took me to made mirror polished drop points with soldered on guards and micarta or stag handles.........that was the way things were done in the eighties.
So after a week of 10 to 12 hour days making knives, I came back with a notebook full of ideas, a big pile of templates, many of which originated in Bob Loveless' shop, a variable speed motor and controller, and a bunch of techniques tried and tested for decades.
That was 1982; I went from making really funky knives to trying to make knives as good as what I saw in SoCal on my trip, which included a visit to a truck driver who collected SRJ's knives. I really was astounded.....I wondered how someone could make something so perfect with their bare hands!!!
A lot of years went by, grinding knives when I got home from a long day at the surf shop, staying out there til 10 or 11 at night, or 2AM on Fri and Sat nites.....I began a semi annual trek to the local gun show in Honolulu with as many knives as I could get done on my table......Cannot forget the first one....two days, countless people looked......not one sale. Later two of my friends came over and both bought one after seeing them on my table.....but instant success was not in my future!!! Looking back, I can say that did two things that were really positive. I tried harder, and it kept me humble!
As I ground more and more blades, I started to get the hang of it, and by the time 1990 rolled around I won the Best Fighter Award at Dan's show in Anaheim......AND came home with $3600!! That seemed like a fortune back then......I was elated, but I still had a long way to go.
(to put this into perspective-last June it cost me nearly $2800 just to go to the Blade Show)
Two years later I made it to the 10th Annual BAKCA show, which they put on in the brand new Marriot in downtown San Francisco. Made about 14 various assorted shapes as best as I knew how.....had a table next to a guy from NC who had a lot of similar knives on his table, but someone who had a lot more name recognition than I did........all weekend he sold knives, I sold none!!!!
Dont quit your day job kid!!! (My standard reply when someone tells me they want to be a knife maker!)
For the next three years I kept at it, going to the LA show once a year and learning everything I could about how to build a better knife......until a fateful day in 1995. I was getting dressed for my oldest daughters wedding, it was a Saturday morning, and Michele Hornby called and told me Glenn had passed away the evening before from a heart complication.....I was devastated...........so hard to believe. He had become one of my very best friends. At the tender age of 48 he left his wife with three kids to raise........never forget, there is no promise that tomorrow will come for any of us. We can plan all we want, but God is in control of the events of our life......we need to look to Him in every decision.

Something happened later that year, seemingly so small and inconsequential, that turned into a very large coincidence in my life five years later. I went to the SHOT show for the first time in Jan, with the HPD recruit firearms training team, many of whom were my good friends........after walking untold miles for four days, we went over to the convention center north of Vegas to a gun show and I ran into this guy with these funky basic bead blasted knives on his table....an energetic guy with a ton of blades, looked like he made them all in his garage, in a hurry. I was looking at them (all the while thinking this guy has a lot to learn) when he asked me if I wanted to buy one. "No, thanks, I make my own."


"Oh yea, like what?" It just so happened that I had this exquisite pink ivory handled bowie in my bag that I was delivering to Hans Vang on the other side of the show......so I pulled it out.
The guys jaw dropped, really! And so it was that I became acquainted with Duane Dwyer! (Years later he somehow acquired that very knife and it is in his safe)
After that, I became very disinterested in making knives. I still made a few, I could always use the extra money, but without Glenn's guidance coupled with a complete lack of interest from the public at the local gun show, I got discouraged and began to think I would give it up.



Then another little coincidence popped up.........Ken Onion. He had gotten hurt at work, one of the two oil refiners here on Oahu, and while he was recuperating from his very serious back injury, he began to make folders and came up with the speed safe. His popularity soared and he began to go to many of the big shows on the mainland.
Watching all of this from the sidelines, still very uncertain about trusting our finances to the fickle knife market.......both Ken and Duane began to encourage me to start going to the larger shows in LA and Atlanta and Vegas......One thing Ken told me that really stuck. As he went to all the big shows with all the big name knife makers.........far too many tables had the same kind of knives on them. The only real difference was the handle material, the logo, and the price. "Make something unique, something that will set you apart."


I had a great idea for a folder............partially brought to reality when I made two framelocks for a certain knife designer from Switzerland, but the true beginning was when copfish (John Fisher) emailed me and asked me to make a Talonite blade for his Sebenza. I convinced him to let me make one of my own design and thus the first TNT (Talonite aNd Titanium) came into being.
From the first basic framelock design, I slowly added a number of different blades and handles to the lineup, and pretty soon I got a call from Buck, asking if I wanted to do a collaboration!
By this time I had gotten out of the surfboard business and spent every dime I had on sharpening equipment, diamond wheel machines to sharpen carbide for the cabinet shop and wood working industry.
The orders began to roll in and I had a hard time keeping up.........years before I had dreamed of being a full time knifemaker, but I decided I could never make enough money to support my family doing that and put it on the back burner.
Then the end of the Clinton era rolled around. They had made such big slashes in the military budget that a lot of work got put off on our island, where the military payroll accounts for the second biggest part of Oahu's economy. My sharpening business got slower and slower........
My wife, the one with the brains in our family, told me I should get a website. I thought I should go back to making surfboards. I was sure the website idea was lame......it would cost a bunch of money and would amount to nothing. Little did I know!
I can look back now, and see that all those little coincidences were all the result of God at work in my life, nudging me along........watching over me.

Within two years of going online, I had a three year backlog and was selling every knife I took to the shows, as well as hooking up with some of the largest knife purveyors on the web.....As I began to sell all of my knives before I even got to my table, I decide to take the plunge and go full time.
Sounds great!? Well.......there are a lot of ups....and downs. One of the biggest struggles is that you are selling a completely nonessential product........so many times the check that is supposed to be coming doesnt show up when you expect it. Sometimes from your very best friends!!! Money management is very hard to do when you dont have any money. Things are a lot better now, but when I first went at this full time there were plenty of times when I had to start living on my credit card.....hoping to pay it off whenever.
Life is difficult at times......Being self employed means that you dont make a dime unless you get it done and there is no one to blame except yourself......but I have spent my life doing what I wanted to, and with all the ups and downs, I would not change anything......it has been very rewarding, and along the way I have met some of the most wonderful people I have ever known.......people that I would have never known even existed if it were not for the fact that I became a knifemaker and started traveling to Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Atlanta, San Francisco, and all the other place that this business has taken me. I count myself blessed to have you guys as my friends.

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Old 17-08-2015, 03:44 PM   #8006
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Form follows function.. that has always been my guiding principle, not just in knives. And like most things in life there is no one holy do-it-all. Balance is the key.. it is foremost a balance of one's cutting task needs matched to certain desired qualities. Be prepared to sacrifice some.

If I have my perfect knife -- it would be a super hard thin hollow grind that retains an edge forever but never chip. 2 swipe on a strop and its all back to hair splitting sharpness. Have?
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Old 17-08-2015, 06:45 PM   #8007
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Form follows function.. that has always been my guiding principle, not just in knives. And like most things in life there is no one holy do-it-all. Balance is the key.. it is foremost a balance of one's cutting task needs matched to certain desired qualities. Be prepared to sacrifice some.

If I have my perfect knife -- it would be a super hard thin hollow grind that retains an edge forever but never chip. 2 swipe on a strop and its all back to hair splitting sharpness. Have?
look at Phil Wilson knives close to what you want
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Old 17-08-2015, 08:04 PM   #8008
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Form follows function.. that has always been my guiding principle, not just in knives. And like most things in life there is no one holy do-it-all. Balance is the key.. it is foremost a balance of one's cutting task needs matched to certain desired qualities. Be prepared to sacrifice some.

If I have my perfect knife -- it would be a super hard thin hollow grind that retains an edge forever but never chip. 2 swipe on a strop and its all back to hair splitting sharpness. Have?
Pfft... You obviously missed your chance to buy this. Best money I've ever spent on any knife, kappa.
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Old 18-08-2015, 05:20 AM   #8009
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hi guys, looking to buy a spyderco delica (maybe a mini-grip) after reading much on this thread. what is the best way to get my hands on this knife in singapore.

many thanks!

Last edited by nametaken; 18-08-2015 at 07:24 AM..
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Old 18-08-2015, 11:37 AM   #8010
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I know there are some of you who are discerning and know exactly what you want. Some who have dabbled custom makes for the longest time. Others who are new and are seeking to find out more - there's a ton of marketing BS out there, pretty pics, dramatic pics catering to the new and curious.

I thought the steak analogy used by the poster (I extracted this from BF) is noteworthy:



When you buy your knives, use them and don't get caught up with fads.

ps: that's why I still like my parangs over any khukri

Ah, you like parangs for use in the rainforest. I'd thought you like them more than Khukuri for aesthetics. Agree with the appropriateness of parang for rainforest than Khukuri.

I use all of my knives and sometimes have personal fads. My knives have no resale value because they are used, not rare and not popular.

Currently into large traditional working knives, particular parangs and khukuri for their design and heritage.
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