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Old 18-11-2015, 11:24 AM   #8296
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TWhat's your thought process? (:
A knife is supposed to be dirt cheap, looks reasonably nice, have a semi-decent steel that can cut hard stuff like cardboard and cable ties and retains its edge under such use for at least a week.

No need for classy stuff like titanium handles or lockbars, or supersteels like S30V. 7Cr17 and 8Cr13MoV are good enough, but bottom barrel steels like 3Cr13 are not.

Last edited by Rock-kun; 18-11-2015 at 11:27 AM..
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Old 18-11-2015, 11:52 AM   #8297
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8Cr13Mov comparable to Aus8?

Another way to look at it. The money for buying multiple dirt cheap folders added up can buy you a mid range Spyderco with VG10/S30V in the $100- $200 range.
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Old 18-11-2015, 11:55 AM   #8298
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8Cr13Mov comparable to Aus8?

Another way to look at it. The money for buying multiple dirt cheap folders added up can buy you a mid range Spyderco with VG10/S30V in the $100- $200 range.
It keeps things interesting since there's a large variety to pick and choose from everyday. Plus the heartpain involved is totally negligible if it gets lost somehow, especially during reservist.
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Old 18-11-2015, 01:27 PM   #8299
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8Cr13Mov comparable to Aus8?

Another way to look at it. The money for buying multiple dirt cheap folders added up can buy you a mid range Spyderco with VG10/S30V in the $100- $200 range.
My thoughts exactly. But I agree... 50++= choices, choices and more choices.
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Old 18-11-2015, 04:49 PM   #8300
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Some "supersteel" knives to consider if you're looking at getting a first "good knife" this Black Friday.

S30V - Buck Vantage (you can upsize it for an additional cost)

This is a really good choice. Heat treat from Buck has always been exceptional, made in USA at a reasonable price point.



S35VN - Kizer Sunburst

I own one myself and this has been a great performing knife so far. For a pretty reasonable price, you get S35VN and aluminum handles. S35VN might not be as easy to sharpen if you're used to sharpening the likes of 8Cr13MoV, but edge holding is significantly better.



CTS-XHP - Cold Steel Hold Out III

Cold Steel knives have become more awesome since their switch to the higher end steels. At this price point, the Hold Out III is probably the cheapest CTS-XHP folder on the market. You also get the fabled strength of Tri-Ad lock in this knife. This knife is pretty lightweight compared to most of Cold Steel's offerings.



VG-10 - Spyderco Delica 4 FFG

Probably the quintessential working man's pocket knife as suggested by its namesake (Delica is an abbreviation for delivery car in Japanese). VG-10 may not be as good as the higher tier supersteels, but it is easy to sharpen and takes a scary edge. Another point to note is that Spyderco will be enforcing MAP by next year, so grab the Delica at whatever reasonable price you see online while you can.
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Old 18-11-2015, 05:53 PM   #8301
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Probably the quintessential working man's pocket knife as suggested by its namesake (Delica is an abbreviation for delivery car in Japanese).
now that's a nugget of info I did not know

and is 'endura' something as well?
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Old 18-11-2015, 06:25 PM   #8302
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now that's a nugget of info I did not know

and is 'endura' something as well?
Endura not anything specific I know of. Probably something to do with endurance and lasting long, like how a working knife should.
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Old 18-11-2015, 10:09 PM   #8303
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singer oil works. ikea mineral oil works but it's rather thick and doesn't apply easily (pls don't use for pivots, it'll be gummy and attract lots of dirt). I use eezox myself as I like the smell - but as it's rather expensive, I save it for the custom folders. For parang, I use ikea mineral oil...mixed with a little secret spice for a nice aromatic smell

don't use cooking oil - it'll turn rancid. for kitchen knives, a little olive oil works too, but cooking oil is thick and doesn't apply easily.

have fun oiling your blades.
Thank you guys for the help! I've Singer oil on hand and will use it for the blades.

Now for my stag and wood handles. The guys on Bladeforums recommend using mineral oil to care for them. I don't want to risk ruining them with Singer oil.

Do you know of any specific, better quality mineral oil that I can find locally?

I admit that I'm a lurker. However, I definitely look forward to taking some pictures and sharing my knives here soon!

My preference lies with traditional slip joints. I started out with modern folders too, but once I discovered the traditional world, I knew I'm home.

As the name of this thread suggests, I'm more of a collector. While I value utility, and have my hard-use utility knives - this hobby is fuelled more by my emotions than logic. There is absolutely no way for me to rationalise spending such amounts on a single knife. Especially in an urban setting such as Singapore.

I tried, I failed, and I just gave in. I no longer try to justify my purchases through utility and function alone.

When you finally acknowledge that this is an addiction, and you collect and buy simply because you enjoy having these little gems. It becomes a lot easier, and a lot more fun!

Don't you agree?

I enjoy, and pay, for the heritage, the history, the stories, the craftsmanship, the attention to details, the people behind it, the people selling it.

I buy it for that shiok feeling in my hands when I curl my fingers around its exquisitely crafted handle. These edged implements are a joy. It is what defines us - we are what we are because we have opposable thumbs and can use tools. The knife is our first and most important tool.

I love it, and I guess you do too!
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Old 18-11-2015, 11:03 PM   #8304
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Thank you guys for the help! I've Singer oil on hand and will use it for the blades.

Now for my stag and wood handles. The guys on Bladeforums recommend using mineral oil to care for them. I don't want to risk ruining them with Singer oil.

Do you know of any specific, better quality mineral oil that I can find locally?

I admit that I'm a lurker. However, I definitely look forward to taking some pictures and sharing my knives here soon!

My preference lies with traditional slip joints. I started out with modern folders too, but once I discovered the traditional world, I knew I'm home.

As the name of this thread suggests, I'm more of a collector. While I value utility, and have my hard-use utility knives - this hobby is fuelled more by my emotions than logic. There is absolutely no way for me to rationalise spending such amounts on a single knife. Especially in an urban setting such as Singapore.

I tried, I failed, and I just gave in. I no longer try to justify my purchases through utility and function alone.

When you finally acknowledge that this is an addiction, and you collect and buy simply because you enjoy having these little gems. It becomes a lot easier, and a lot more fun!

Don't you agree?

I enjoy, and pay, for the heritage, the history, the stories, the craftsmanship, the attention to details, the people behind it, the people selling it.

I buy it for that shiok feeling in my hands when I curl my fingers around its exquisitely crafted handle. These edged implements are a joy. It is what defines us - we are what we are because we have opposable thumbs and can use tools. The knife is our first and most important tool.

I love it, and I guess you do too!
stag, ivory, horn and natural materials which are not stabilized are subject to shrinkage or expansion/cracks - it doesn't happen all the time but it may. This is noticeable when you are dealing with folders/full tang handles on fixed blades/knives with bolsters. I've had non-stabilized cocobolo shrink considerably on a hunter. Some natural woods are very dense and oily and don't require stabilization (for eg. ebony). you can try buying ikea mineral oil to soak the stag handles once a year - but it is very thick so wiping it off thereafter is gonna be a pain. however, there may be some discolouration. you need to soak overnight. A lot depends on the weather - changes in temperature, humidity etc all affect natural materials.

http://www.ikea.com/sg/en/catalog/products/00170993/

on my makka-wood (a type of thai rosewood) handled enep, I wipe down with mineral oil periodically, but I don't soak it (a bit more troublesome).

Singer Oil, mineral oil, machine oil - they're all byproducts of petroleum. The difference is in additives that affect the smell (some oils are 'scented' for brand/item recognition) or in different grades of mineral oil (some are food grade as defined by FDA, singer oil isn't) or in the viscosity.

here's a quote from Roger Pinnock from Bladeforums - Roger collects very high end bowies so he knows a thing or two about what he's talking about...

Hey Holger,

Yeah, I use an old plastic ice-cream tub 3/4 or so filled with mineral oil. That's enough to completely immerse a bowie handle to just past the hilt. I leave it immersed for 24hrs. twice per year. I have not noticed any darkening. Works great for mammoth and walrus ivories as well.

Roger
Sometimes people use beeswax or a beeswax and oil mixture.

The biggest problem is the difference in humidity where the knife was made and Singapore/where you are keeping it. I've had a tight fit saya/scabbard become loose when it reached me. The knife just popped out and I had to insert a shim into the scabbard in order to hold the knife in. Sometimes you gotta ask the maker to get either stabilized material or make the fit during a period of time which is closer to the humidity/temperature in Singapore. A fit done in the summer in Arizona isn't going to work once it arrives in Singapore, IMO, lol.

I'm looking forward to your pictures because you mentioned wooden handles!

Last edited by vespaguy; 18-11-2015 at 11:22 PM..
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Old 18-11-2015, 11:23 PM   #8305
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Endura not anything specific I know of. Probably something to do with endurance and lasting long, like how a working knife should.
Endura sounds like a good name for a tongkat ali product
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Old 19-11-2015, 07:49 AM   #8306
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Thank you guys for the help! I've Singer oil on hand and will use it for the blades.

Now for my stag and wood handles. The guys on Bladeforums recommend using mineral oil to care for them. I don't want to risk ruining them with Singer oil.

Do you know of any specific, better quality mineral oil that I can find locally?

I admit that I'm a lurker. However, I definitely look forward to taking some pictures and sharing my knives here soon!

My preference lies with traditional slip joints. I started out with modern folders too, but once I discovered the traditional world, I knew I'm home.

As the name of this thread suggests, I'm more of a collector. While I value utility, and have my hard-use utility knives - this hobby is fuelled more by my emotions than logic. There is absolutely no way for me to rationalise spending such amounts on a single knife. Especially in an urban setting such as Singapore.

I tried, I failed, and I just gave in. I no longer try to justify my purchases through utility and function alone.

When you finally acknowledge that this is an addiction, and you collect and buy simply because you enjoy having these little gems. It becomes a lot easier, and a lot more fun!

Don't you agree?

I enjoy, and pay, for the heritage, the history, the stories, the craftsmanship, the attention to details, the people behind it, the people selling it.

I buy it for that shiok feeling in my hands when I curl my fingers around its exquisitely crafted handle. These edged implements are a joy. It is what defines us - we are what we are because we have opposable thumbs and can use tools. The knife is our first and most important tool.

I love it, and I guess you do too!
Good post. Describes well the reason why we collect.

Antler or horn AFAIK don't need any further treatment. I collect traditional bows with horn on the belly and they do just fine in Singapore humidity. Wood mostly comes with a layer of finishing. Usually don't have to further coat with anything unless the finishing scratches off with hard use. Beeswax may work for extra layer of protection. I use polyurethane floor varnish when I want to refinish my wooden items.

Last edited by Stevejobless; 19-11-2015 at 01:10 PM..
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Old 19-11-2015, 07:56 AM   #8307
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This can be a point of discussion too (: With having so many of such pieces, why not consider bumping up to productions (Spyderco, zt, etc) or even midtechs? What's your thought process? (:
For me its because I use all my knives regularly. Not really a collector. Just want knives that can do the job well and I won't mind losing or damaging.

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Old 19-11-2015, 11:17 AM   #8308
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How would one make a purchase off BladeHQ? Looking at the bolstered Boker Kwaiken among other things to get on Black Friday.
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Old 19-11-2015, 11:52 AM   #8309
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some great posts. now let's see some pics.

stag - some I like, some I don't. I like the amber ones with the some knobbly bits, but give me exotic stabilized wood or walrus or oosik or weathered artifact ivory over stag. I love artifact ivory but I'm not sure if they allow export to Singapore under CITES.

For actual hard use/rough use - the synthetics hold up better or dense wood.

let's see some stag pictures pls.
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Old 19-11-2015, 01:20 PM   #8310
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Good post. Describes well the reason why we collect.

Antler or horn AFAIK don't need any further treatment. I collect traditional bows with horn on the belly and they do just fine in Singapore humidity. Wood mostly comes with a layer of finishing. Usually don't have to further coat with anything unless the finishing scratches off with hard use. Beeswax may work for extra layer of protection. I use polyurethane floor varnish when I want to refinish my wooden items.
care to share pics of the bows? I like em too. Just too little disposable income. Poly varnish is great...if you are careful when you let them dry before applying subsequent coats. Being impatient, I've ruined some nice bowls haha. When properly done, it leaves a high gloss finish, IIRC.
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