HWZ Forums

Login Register FAQ Mark Forums Read

TIPS and INFO when buying that new TV - Read this thread before you buy that TV

Like Tree3Likes
Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-05-2009, 01:30 PM   #16
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Avoiding burn in

Good references:

http://www.plasmasaver.com/burnin.html

http://www.plasmatvbuyingguide.com/p...tv-burnin.html

"
So, how do you prevent burn-in on your brand-new plasma TV screen?
(1) Some obvious advice: Do not leave static images on your plasma TV screen for more than an hour. Turn off your unit when you are not watching it. Do not pause DVDs for more than 20 minutes at a time.
(2) Know that plasma screens are more prone to burn-in during their first 200 hours of use. When phosphors are fresh, they burn more intensely as they are ignited. This means that relatively new plasma display TVs are prone to "ghosting", which occurs when on-screen images appear to stay on the screen belatedly. This is a function of the high intensity with which new phosphors "pop," and this phenomenon usually "washes out" on its own, as the screen displays subsequent images. Displaying a bright, or moving snow image (as with a DVD or VCR with no input) will "wash" a ghost image from the screen in most cases. Many plasma manufacturers have installed anti-burn settings, which are monotone gray or snow screen settings which recalibrate pixel intensity levels uniformly - thus eliminating any image retention (ghosting). It is a good idea to run this type of program after the first 100 hours or so.
(3) Adjust the CONTRAST setting at or below 50% on your new plasma TV. These days most plasma TVs are preset to either peak or very high contrast (also called picture setting on many TVs). This forces phosphors to glow more intensely, which decreases the length of time necessary for burn-in to occur. Our advice is to reduce the contrast setting to 50% or less for the first 200 hours of use. And, be sure to avail yourself of your plasma's anti-burn-in features.
(4) Some plasma televisions burn-in more easily than others. In my experience, AliS type panels -- the ones utilized by Hitachi and Fujistu -- seem more readily given over to problems with burn-in. As well, be more wary of the 2nd and 3rd tier brands as their technology is usually not as up to date as some of the better 1st tier brands.
(5) When displaying video games and other content which have static images, use your burn-in protection features like power management settings, full-time picture shift (both vertical and horizontal), and automatic screen-saver functions. Check your Owner's Manual for further information.
(6) Realize that quality matters with burn-in as with everything else. Purchase a plasma display that has really good scaling, so that you can watch 4:3 TV programs in widescreen comfortably. It is better not to display black bars on your TV screen for prolonged periods of time (especially in the first 200 hours), so you are probably better off watching most everything in "full screen" mode. This should not be much of a problem todays selection of widescreen HDTV and DVDT content.
Also, higher quality TVs tend to be more resistant to burn-in -- though not entirely immune to it. Of the plasma displays I've owned and/or tested extensively, NEC, Sony, Pioneer, and Panasonic seemed least prone to burn-in once the plasma screen was properly broken in.
Note: There are some applications which are simply not well suited to plasma display technology. The static flight schedule signage at airports, for example. It amazes me to walk into an airport and see a ruined plasma display monitor hanging from the ceiling with what is obviously an extreme case of permanent burn- in. As LCD monitors have increased in size, they are being used to replace plasma displays in this types of setting."
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 10-05-2009, 01:32 PM   #17
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Buying Overseas

Prices Stateside and in Oz are much cheaper, but they have economies of scale which we don't.

Every now and then someone gets a bright spark to ask about bringing one over, and NO ONE has succeded.

Every few days / weeks someone sees a good deal on the internet from USA, UK or Oz and comes up with the same bright idea:
"Why not ship from XXX country?"
Or there is a deal on the internet, local or overseas that attracts the attention of the local bird - (cheap cheap)

I have seen prices in Oz that are close to 2k cheaper than Singapore. Even panels that don't exist here. Big ones, with digital tuners, optical output, etc and other things the local sellers take out and yet charge more.
Have I seen anyone succeed?

Yes, once. Someone was bringing home a whole container and brought home a panel with considerable savings from USA. That panel was wrapped extremely well and our brother was happy. Most success stories related to people with professional packers who are willing to spend, not cost conscious folks looks for the cheap cheap.
AFAIK, thats it, no one else, but I am v v happy to be corrected. If someone does this or knows a place, hey thats wonderful news.
So Why Not?
Here comes the caveat:

From anywhere:
- no warranty
- if the large piece of glass gets damaged on the way home, (I assume it is coming by boat since air shipping is prohibitively expensive) you are on your own.
- that precious digital tuner may not work in Singapore
The shipper must be able to give you insurance.

In addition, those from USA:

A - its NTSC
B - transformer issues, unless it explicitly says 110-220v, you can render that expensive panel a useless work of glass art if you plug it directly into our local sockets.
Oh and speakering of sockets, those considering imports from UK will need to know how to use SCART sockets, again google or wiki for them and if you don't know what they are, its best not to import unless there are enough of the other sockets for you.
Plus the menus may not be in English - eg if you get from Japan.


Bottom line, if the deal is too good to be true, then it probably is. Caveat emptor.

http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/in...?topic=46563.0
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 10-05-2009, 01:33 PM   #18
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
1080i vs 1080p

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/techn...concerned.html

A good article on this, interlacing, adaptive motion etc.

The right way to process 1080i is to de-interlace it to 1080p (regardless of what the TV's native resolution is) using motion adaptive de-interlacing. This is a process which involves detecting which areas of the picture are moving and which ones are not, and then combining fields in the non-moving areas while interpolating the moving ones (filling in the spaces between the alternating lines with average, in between values) . If you have a 1080p display (which actually displays 1080p without cropping and re-scaling), you're done, because the result is a 1080p signal. If you have a TV of any other resolution, it's then just a matter of scaling the 1080p signal to whatever the native resolution of the device is.
So even though you might only have a 720 line device, that device needs to be able to handle 1080p (at least inside the display after performing de-interlacing in order to maximize its potential when viewing a 1080i source.
Bet the sales person didn't mention that when he sold you that shiny new TV, did he?
Let's look at some illustrations:If this were a scene shot at 1080i, and displayed at 1080i, it would look like this. But today's digital TV's cannot do this. The signal must be de-interlaced.
If we de-interlace it the WRONG way, it would look like this.
The entire scene is reduced to 540 lines worth of resolution. Hint: look at the hands.
If you display this on a 1366x768 TV (a common resolution right now), you will be wasting 1/3 of the resolution you paid for!
If we de-interlace it the RIGHT way though, to 1080p, it would look like this.
Only the areas in motion are reduced in detail. The rest remains at the full 1080 line resolution.
Though you need a full 1920 x 1080 TV to maximize the detail present, on a lesser TV, say a 1366 x 768 model, you will still realize the device's full potential.

Still wonder if you should care about 1080p?
When you view SD TV on a full HD screen, you better have a good video chip, and if you buy a cheap Full HD panel, they will be using a cheap video chip, so don't be surprised that channel 5 or 8 looks so bad on your basic Full HD flatscreen.
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 10-05-2009, 01:36 PM   #19
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
HDMI versions:

http://www.audioholics.com/education...-hdmi-versions

HDMI has changed versions so many times it's been hard to keep up for most people. We've talked about the versions as part of other articles and documents, but it seemed fitting that we'd formulate and maintain a definitive document outlining the changes in a straightforward and easy-to-digest manner for all concerned.
Hopefully this article helps you understand the format differences and aids in your ability to discern what features are important to you as you shop for HDMI-equipped products.
HDMI 1.0

Release date: December 2002
Specs:
  • Single-cable digital audio/video connection with a maximum bitrate of 4.9Gbps.
  • Supports up to 165Mpixels/sec video (1080p at 60Hz or UXGA)
  • 8-channels of 192kHz/24-bit audio (PCM)
Abstract: The original HDMI v1.0 spec was and remains sufficient for most purposes. The reason is that it is a solid backwards-compatible format that can , through PCM audio handle all of the high definition audio formats present today. The key is having a player that can decode these native HD audio formats to uncompressed PCM. DSD and DVD-audio cannot be natively sent over HDMI 1.0. What HDMI 1.0 fails to do, is account for additional bandwidth provided by Deep Color (10- 12 and 16-bit color depths). It also does not support the new xvYCC color space.
Practical Issues and tips: Most CableTV set-top boxes use HDMI 1.0. The maximum output for this spec is 1080p at 60Hz with 8-bit color depth. Regardless of any display of higher version of HDMI you may have, the source will always limit the maximum bit-depth potential. An HDMI 1.0 device can still pull 8 channels of uncompressed PCM audio and as is perfectly fine for most users.
HDMI 1.1

Release date: May 2004
Specs:
  • Added support for DVD Audio
  • Slight mechanical and electrical spec changes
Abstract: HDMI 1.1 simply added the ability for the system to transmit DVD-Audio signal over the cbale form the player to the receiving device. If both devices are rated to v1.1 then a DVD-Audio signal can be sent and received. Please note that by "DVD-Audio" we mean the high resolution audio format, not the audio present on a typical DVD disc.
Practical Issues and tips: HDMI 1.1 is very common and was the first spec to hit the mass market apart from CableTV set-top boxes. Many AV receivers came out with this spec and are fine for handling DVD-Audio and uncompressed PCM audio.
HDMI 1.2
Release date: August 2005
Specs:
  • Added DSD (Direct Stream Digital) support, allowing native transmission of Super Audio CD (SACD) content at up to 8 channels
  • Enabled and acknowledged an HDMI Type A connector for PC-based sources
  • Permitted PC sources to use native RGB color-space with the optional ability to also support the YCbCr color space for consumer electronics applications
  • Mandated that HDMI 1.2 and later displays support low-voltage sources such as those found with PCI Express technology (the current display interface standard for PC video cards)
Abstract: HDMI 1.2 was the biggest jump since the introduction of HDMI. It really brought the PC market into focus and was developed and announced so as to compete better with the emerging VESA DisplayPort standard. For those still clinging to their universal DVD players, HDMI v1.2 finally delivered the promise of a true one-cable solution for all current high-definition audio sources.
Practical Issues and tips: If you want to utilize a fully native universal DVD player without converting the SACD to PCM then HDMI 1.2 is required. We've found that if the player does a good job at conversion, however, v1.2 isn't always that important.
HDMI 1.2a
Release date: December 2005
Specs:
  • Fully specified Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) features, command sets, and compliance tests
  • Minor changes to CEC (Consumer Electronic Control) spec
Abstract: This incremental change clarified one of the earlier promises of HDMI, Consumer Electronic Control - a feature that promised "smart" interoperability between components. Unfortunately, this wasn't exactly standardized across the board and, as a result, nearly all manufacturers products only interface within their own brands. Of all things, this is the most disappointing failure of HDMI to-date.
Practical Issues and tips: This is a common format for manufacturers using CEC. There is no practical reason to prefer 1.2a over 1.2. If you don't intend to use the native DSD signal from an SACD player via HDMI, v1.1 is just as good as 1.2 or 1.2a.
HDMI 1.3

Release date: June 2006
Specs:
  • Increased single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps)
  • Optionally supports 10-bit, 12-bit, and 16-bit "Deep Color" per channel (over one billion colors) up from 8-bit
  • Allowed the use of xvYCC color space (previously just sRGB or YCbCr)
  • Incorporated automatic audio "lip" syncing capability
  • Supported output of native Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio streams for external decoding by AV receivers
  • Made available a new Type C "mini" connector for devices such as camcorders
  • Added gamut Metadata transmission capability
  • Added Reference Cable Equalizer mandate to high frequency displays to recapture degraded copper cable signal
Abstract: To be plain, this update was a complete disaster. First of all, nobody asked for HDMI 1.3, except perhaps the companies behind the new high definition audio formats. Of course TrueHD and DTS-HD, the lossless audio codec formats used on HD DVDs and Blu-ray Discs could be decoded into uncompressed audio by the players. This makes 1.3 irrelevant for audio. What made HDMI 1.3 such as disaster was the increased bandwidth requirements - which hit an already suffering cable market with new requirements for digital signal transmission. Before HDMI 1.3, it was almost impossible to get a non-active copper HDMI cable to pass 1080p at distances greater than 50 feet. After HDMI 1.3, with the addition of Deep Color, that distance shrank to less than 20 feet, causing industry-wide failures on installed cabling systems.
Expensive active solutions started coming on-board to alleviate some of the problems within several months but even today there is a large amount of consumer confusion regarding cable certification and how far a signal will travel over copper cables. The spec also mandated that HDMI 1.3-compliant displays (sinks) which took advantage of high frequency content (Deep Color) must implement built-in cable equalization to help compensate for cable losses through copper cables. Thanks to several companies dedicated to certifying their products for specific distances, this issue is slowly becoming more manageable. The first product on the market with HDMI 1.3 was the PlayStation 3 gaming console.
Practical Issues and tips: HDMI 1.3 is a requirement for Deep Color support or use of the new xvYCC expanded color space. If high definition audio is important to you, you still may not need v1.3 if your player can decode the native HD audio formats into uncompressed PCM audio. This uncompressed audio, up to 8 channels, can be sent over HDMI 1.0.Typically, 24p support coincides with v1.3, however this is nothing more than coincidence of when both format and spec came into popularity.

HDMI 1.3a
Release date: November 2006
Specs:
  • Cable and Sink modifications for Type C
  • Source termination recommendation
  • Removed undershoot and maximum rise/fall time limits.
  • CEC capacitance limits changed
  • RGB video quantization range clarification
  • audio control commands added to CEC and commands for timer control brought back in an altered form
  • Concurrently released compliance test specification included
Abstract: An incremental change, v1.3a is mostly an adjustment for manufacturers utilizing CEC features as well as those integrating the new Type C connector (seen only in smaller form factor products and quite rare to-date).
Practical Issues and tips: There is no consumer-focused practical difference between HDMI v1.3a and v1.3.
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 10-05-2009, 01:39 PM   #20
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQk-j5YCLCY

How to get the best from your TV
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 12-05-2009, 11:22 AM   #21
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
More HDMI info

Courtesy of this website:

http://hometheatermag.printthis.clic...partnerID=3830

[size=10pt]Hook Me Up
HDMI 101
By Joshua Zyber • March, 2009
How important is HDMI 1.3 anyway?
The HDMI standard was developed with noble intentions. Most people in the home theater hobby know the hazards of cable clutter. When you have a lot of equipment connected this way and that by separate audio and video cables, you wind up with a tangled mess of wires behind your equipment rack or entertainment center. The problem is compounded by component video (three cables just for picture) and multichannel analog audio (six to eight more cables!). Now factor in a DVR, a couple of DVD players, a Blu-ray player, a video processor, and an A/V receiver all interconnected in one theater room. If you want to add or remove any piece of equipment, you’ll have to squat behind the rack with a flashlight and trying to trace each cable from end to end. Which unit did this blue one come from? If I plug that red cable into here, will I get my picture back, or will my speakers start blaring obnoxious noises?

HDMI was supposed to help with all that. One cable carries both video and audio. Better yet, it carries high-definition video and high- resolution multichannel audio, plus it has all the latest copy-protection protocols that the Hollywood studios demand. In theory, it’s the perfect connection standard for Blu-ray. One HDMI cable out from the Blu-ray player to an A/V receiver, and another HDMI cable out from the receiver to an HDTV should be all it takes to get stunning 1080p picture and lossless audio, all fully encrypted with a minimum of cable clutter. So why are there so many different versions of HDMI? And which ones do you need to be concerned with?

HDMI is an evolving standard that first came to market before all of its features were finalized. The original HDMI version 1.0 established the basic parameters for transmitting high- definition video and uncompressed audio. This was followed by several revisions that added, among other features, support for the DVD-Audio format and some PC applications. For home theater purposes, any HDMI connection type from 1.0 to 1.2a will transmit 1080p picture and multichannel PCM sound equally well. However, at the very least, they will not carry the native digital bitstreams for the advanced Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio lossless audio formats.
The most significant revision to the HDMI spec came with version 1.3, which added support for a few new features that are useful for home theater applications. (Later versions such as 1.3a, 1.3b, and 1.3c add more remote control options and other improvements to their functionality, but they add nothing directly related to additional core audio or video.) In order to benefit from these new features, both ends of the signal chain—as well as any switches, splitters, or other intermediary devices—must be compliant with HDMI 1.3. As a result, HDMI 1.3 has become a marketing tool for many manufacturers to encourage consumers to upgrade their Blu-ray players, A/V receivers, and even all of their cables. You wouldn’t want to be noncompliant with all of the latest features, would you? Of course, this begs the question: Does a Blu-ray viewer really need HDMI 1.3 to get the most out of the format? The answer is a resounding maybe. To delve a little deeper, let’s take a look at what HDMI 1.3 offers that you can’t get in previous versions.

On the video side of things, HDMI 1.3 increases signal bandwidth and allows for the transmission of more color detail. Only HDMI 1.3+ can carry the Deep Color or x.v.YCC formats that promise billions of possible colors, smoother color gradients, and the elimination of banding artifacts. (Naturally, these will only work if both the source and the display are compatible.) That certainly sounds great, but there’s just one problem. The Blu-ray spec doesn’t support either Deep Color or x.v.YCC. Even if a Blu-ray player claims compatibility with these formats (and several do), no Blu-ray Discs are actually encoded with an extended color gamut. Those billions of new colors don’t exist in the Blu-ray source. Any standard HDMI connection can transmit the full video quality that’s available on a Blu-ray Disc.


Does that make HDMI 1.3 irrelevant for video? Not necessarily. At present, a few models of HD camcorders will record content with Deep Color or x.v.YCC. There has also been speculation that some video games may be encoded with one or the other in the future. Although Blu-ray Discs don’t contain the expanded color detail, some Blu-ray player models (such as the recent Pioneer BDP-51FD) may be able to interpolate those extra colors internally, which essentially upconverts the color signal. To take advantage of that, you’ll need HDMI 1.3 and a Deep Color–capable display. On the other hand, some displays may be able to perform that interpolation themselves, negating the need for the Blu-ray player to do it. In the end, there may be some cases where HDMI 1.3 is useful, but it is not strictly necessary for video.

The audio situation is more complicated. Blu-ray Discs can contain movie soundtracks in several possible formats. Regular DTS or Dolby Digital 5.1 work the same as they did on DVD. An S/PDIF cable or any version of HDMI can transmit those lossy codecs without issue. As I mentioned earlier, uncompressed multichannel PCM will also work just fine with any HDMI connection. (S/PDIF doesn’t have enough band- width for that.) Where things get tricky is the usage of the newer audio formats: Dolby Digital Plus, DTS- HD High Resolution Audio, Dolby TrueHD, and DTS-HD Master Audio. Dolby Digital Plus and DTS-HD High Resolution Audio are rarely used on Blu-ray these days, but Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio are very common. All four of these new audio formats have the same transmission limitations. In order to hear the full high-resolution soundtrack, your Blu-ray player must either decode the format internally or transmit its native bitstream to an A/V receiver or surround processor.
Players that decode the advanced audio codecs convert the audio to PCM. The decoded PCM should result in no loss of quality, and it can be output over any HDMI connection. (Some player models may also offer multichannel analog outputs.) In this case, HDMI 1.3 is not needed. Unfortunately, not all Blu-ray players are built with the ability to decode those high- resolution formats in full quality. Some Blu-ray players can only decode standard DTS or Dolby Digital 5.1. And a number of early players decode Dolby TrueHD but not DTS-HD Master Audio. In either case, you’ll need to transmit the codec’s native bitstream and let your A/V receiver or surround processor do the decoding. This will require HDMI 1.3 on both the Blu-ray player and the receiver or surround processor.

Either decoding to multichannel PCM or passing the native bitstream will give you high-quality lossless sound. The choice between letting the Blu-ray player decode the audio or transmitting the native bitstream will depend on the specifics of your equip- ment. For example, the Sony PlayStation 3 offers no bitstream option for the advanced audio formats, but it will decode them internally to PCM. On the other hand, the Panasonic DMP- BD30 will not decode Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio itself but can transmit their native bitstreams. Secondary audio from commentaries, Bonus View, and BD-Live content complicates this decision even further, as the only way to seamlessly mix disc and secondary audio is to let the player handle the decoding.
Older A/V receivers and surround processors may include HDMI inputs that can accept multichannel PCM but not the newer formats. And some A/V receivers and processors—even a few current models—have HDMI inputs that will not handle any type of audio at all over HDMI. Their HDMI inputs are strictly video. If yours is one of these, the only way you’ll be able to listen to the new high-resolution audio formats is from the player’s multichannel audio outputs to the multichannel analog inputs on your A/V receiver or surround processor. In either of these situations, the player must be able to perform the decoding. Every system will have its own particular needs.
For both video and audio, HDMI 1.3 is useful in some home theater applications, but it’s not necessarily required. If you buy new equipment today, the presence of HDMI 1.3 will help with future-proofing if nothing else. However, with a bit of care, it’s still possible to obtain the highest-quality video and audio available from Blu-ray even with older versions of HDMI.
[/size]
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 12-05-2009, 11:24 AM   #22
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Hooking up

From here:
http://hometheatermag.printthis.clic...partnerID=3830



Connections for a High-Def World
By Dana Whitaker • January, 2007

Now that you've bought an HDTV, make sure you hook it up correctly.
Ah, the golden age of television. The only thing I loved more than Lucy was the solitary input on the back of my TV. It was a simpler time. Now we must choose between 300 channels and only slightly fewer inputs. Add HDTV to the mix, with all of its inherent confusion, and it's a recipe for connection disaster.

Component Inputs
Studies consistently show that many HDTV owners aren't watching HD content, either because they aren't getting it from their provider or they don't have their TVs connected correctly. A quick call to your cable/satellite provider can take care of the former, and a quick read of this HD-connection primer can help with the latter. Some TVs and projectors may have HD-capable inputs not listed here; however, for simplicity's sake, we've chosen to focus on the three you're most likely to find on a consumer HDTV.
All three of these connections can support HD resolutions up to 1080p, but it's up to your TV's manufacturer to decide which resolutions to support through each connection. For bandwidth and copy-protection reasons, many choose not to accept 1080p via component video; some don't even accept it through HDMI. An owner's manual will usually list which resolutions each connection supports, so you should do your homework before you buy.

Component Cable
Component Video
Digital connections may be the buzz, but component video is still the standard for sending HD signals from a source to a TV or receiver—at least for the time being. Component video isn't just for HD, either. It's often the highest-quality output on SD sources like DVD players, as it allows for a much cleaner, more colorful picture than lower-quality analog connections like S-video and composite video.

DVI Cable
Component video splits the video signal into three parts, labeled Y, Pb (or **), and Pr (or Cr). Both the connections and the cable are color coded: green for Y, blue for Pb, and red for Pr. The Y element carries the signal's luminance information—which is primarily green, plus enough red and blue to make the image look black and white—and the horizontal and vertical sync pulses that tell the TV when a new frame begins. The Pb element carries the remaining blue, and the Pr element carries the remaining red. RCA is usually the connector of choice for component video, although some professional and high-end equipment may use the twist-and-lock BNC connector for a more secure connection. Prepackaged three-in-one component video cables are easy to find, or, in a pinch, you can simply use individual 75-ohm video cables for each element, as long as they're each the same length and type.
I should stress that not every component video input has the bandwidth to pass a high-definition signal. If one of your HDTV's component video inputs is labeled "480i/480p," that means you should only use it for standard-def sources. With most new HDTVs, it's safe to assume that, unless the component input is labeled otherwise, it is HD capable. If you own an off-the-shelf upconverting DVD player, it is unlikely that you'll be able to view store-bought DVDs at a 1080i or 720p resolution through component video; you must use a digital connection.

DVI Input
Component video is a stable connection that can travel over long distances with minimal degradation, which is why it remains a popular choice in the custom-installation world. In spite of its current popularity and ubiquitous nature, component video will someday fade from the HD landscape, primarily because it lacks the copy protection to protect high-quality digital sources.
DVI
Like component video, the Digital Visual Interface (DVI) connection splits the video signal into three elements to improve image quality. Unlike component video, the digital signal remains in digital form, sent in a format called Transition Minimized Differential Signaling, which divides the signal into its green, red, and blue/sync elements. This connection has its origins in the computer realm and has the bulk and appearance to show for it.

DVI-to-HDMI Adapter (front)
DVI allows you to transmit a fully digital, uncompressed HD signal from source to TV, bypassing the digital-to-analog conversion processes that can potentially degrade signal quality in an analog connection. Because the DVI signal is not compressed, it's much too large to be recorded, which means DVI—and consequently HDMI—is not an option for sending HDTV from a set-top box to some form of digital recording device. (See sidebar.)
To further protect content, DVI employs a form of copy protection called HDCP, or High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection, which prevents DVI devices from communicating properly unless both have HDCP in place. In the home theater realm, many first-generation DVI-equipped displays did not use HDCP and therefore will not display an image coming from a new DVI-equipped DVD player or set-top box. If you're having no luck getting a picture when connecting two devices via DVI, chances are that one of them lacks HDCP—and I'm afraid you're completely out of luck.

DVI-to-HDMI Adapter (back)
Of the three connection types, DVI is the least reliable over a longer video run. The official DVI spec only requires that the equipment maintain the signal up to 16 feet, although you can purchase DVI extension and repeater devices to allow for a longer run. As HDMI becomes increasingly popular, DVI connections are disappearing from new video products.
HDMI
The High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) represents the evolution of DVI. In terms of how it handles a video signal, HDMI is identical to DVI, passing a fully digital, uncompressed signal between source and display. HDMI ups the ante by allowing for the passage of uncompressed multichannel audio and control information. These uncompressed signals are too large to be recorded.

HDMI Input
HDMI has a smaller, more user-friendly form factor than DVI, but the two are usually compatible through the use of a simple adapter, as long as both employ HDCP copy protection. HDMI is more reliable than DVI over a longer video run. If your run is longer than about 20 feet, it may be worth the extra money to invest in a high-quality HDMI cable or an HDMI amplifier or repeater from a company like Gefen or Acoustic Research.
For all of its potential benefits, HDMI can be frustrating to use in its current form. Communication failures abound. Sometimes, you must cue up devices in a particular order to ensure that you get a picture. Other times, a source and a display will communicate well—until you add an A/V receiver to the mix. We've already encountered several instances in which an HDTV and a high-definition DVD player had difficulty communicating over HDMI. Silicon Image, the company that invented HDMI, has attempted to address this through their Simplay HD certification process, which tests a product's HDCP functionality and its interoperability with other HDMI devices. Products that sport the Simplay HD logo have been verified to work together. This is a step in the right direction, but only a few manufacturers' products are currently certified. (For a list, go to www.simplayhd.com.)

HDMI Cable
If and when its bugs are worked out, HDMI could usher in a new golden age of TV, filled with beautiful HD programming and TVs with just a single input. Those would be the days.
Want to Archive Your HDTV Recordings? Ask for FireWire
The good news is that there are plenty of HD DVRs and Media Center PCs that allow you to record your favorite TV shows in HD. The bad news is that, until Blu-ray and HD DVD recorders hit the market (hopefully this year), saving those recordings to a disc presents a challenge. FireWire, or IEEE 1394, remains our best hope for transferring and archiving HD video signals. If your TV or cable/satellite set-top box has active FireWire ports, you can transfer HD recordings—at least of unencrypted channels like ABC, CBS, and NBC—to a recording device, such as a D-VHS recorder or a computer with a Blu-ray or HD DVD burner. In 2004, the FCC mandated that cable companies must give you a FireWire-equipped cable box if you ask for one. So speak up.

FireWire Inputs

FireWire Four-Pin Cable (left) and Six-Pin Cable (right)
Audio in HD
Optical and coaxial digital audio connections have long been the standard method of transferring multichannel digital audio signals from an HDTV or HD set-top box to an A/V receiver, but HDMI is coming on strong. Electronics manufacturers are paying more attention to a receiver or pre/pro's ability to accept both video and audio via HDMI so that you only have to run one connection from a high-definition source, such as a cable box. Current HDMI specs allow you to pass PCM, Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS, DVD-Audio, and SACD; Dolby is the most common format for HDTV broadcasts.
With the arrival of high-definition DVD and the new uncompressed Dolby True HD and DTS-HD Master Audio formats, everything gets a bit more complicated (naturally). With the first crop of high-definition DVD players, you can send compressed Dolby Digital and DTS audio the old-fashioned way, through the optical or coaxial outputs. Or you can let the player decode the Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio internally as uncompressed, multichannel PCM and send it over HDMI to your receiver. The HDMI 1.3 spec, which is just beginning to appear on products, lets you pass the Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD bit stream directly through HDMI to the receiver—if manufacturers and content providers enable it. Confusing? You bet.
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 17-05-2009, 07:47 AM   #23
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Buying on a budget

Everyone has a budget and some of us have a more modest budget than others. This does not mean we should give up owning a nice flatscreen.

Other ways to stretch the dollar are possible.

However what you should consider is:

- avoid getting simply the best specs on Paper for the dollar -- just because there is full HD for 1k, does not mean that TV will be good

- check your viewing diet -- SD and full HD LCD TVs can be a bad idea on cheap panels.

Instead you can get HD ready and get a better panel

Get a run out model and get the previous high end model at a much lower price.

Go to trade shows and get new demo sets.
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 23-05-2009, 08:11 AM   #24
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Good read on HDTV and resolutions:



The truth about 1080p
In the last couple of years, HDTVs with 1080p native resolution have taken over the market at nearly every price and size point. But as we've been saying all along, once you get to high-definition, the difference between resolutions becomes much more difficult to appreciate.

We've done numerous side-by-side tests between two same-size HDTVs, one with 1080p resolution and another with lower resolution, and every time it's been almost impossible to see the difference with regular program material, especially when that material is moving. The difference becomes even more difficult to see at smaller screen sizes or farther seating distances--say, more than 1.5 times the diagonal measurement of the screen. For example, to see the benefits of stationary 1080p content on a 50-inch screen, you'll generally need to sit about 6.5 feet or closer. Few viewers want to sit that close, especially when low-quality content seen at that distance (remember the "garbage" maxim?) looks so bad.

The main visible benefit of 1080p native resolution comes when the display is asked to show computer sources. With a PC set to output 1080p resolution and a 1080p display that can accept it, computer desktops and text generally look superb, and quite a bit better than when displayed on a TV with lower native resolution. But for movies, games, and other standard video material, the benefits of 1080p are negligible unless you're sitting quite close.

That doesn't matter much anymore though. 1080p native resolution is so common among HDTVs, and has so little impact, that you shouldn't even consider it as a factor in your purchasing decision. As we mentioned at the top, factors like contrast and color are more important to image quality, and unfortunately, you can't depend on a specification sheet for an accurate representation of those factors.
1080p/60 versus 1080p/24
1080p HDTVs are a dime a dozen, but not all 1080p HDTVs are created equal. First off, some older HDTVs with 1080p resolution couldn't accept 1080p sources at all. More recently, the advent of Blu-ray has delivered another video format variation to worry about: 1080p/24.

The numbers 24 and 60 refer to frame rate. Moving video is composed of a certain number of frames transmitted every second that combine in the viewer's mind to create the illusion of movement. The nominal rate for film is 24 frames per second, while the rate for video is 30 frames per second. In standard 1080p video, which is technically 1080p/60, each frame is repeated twice. Every 1080p HDTV sold today can accept and display 1080p/60 sources via its HDMI inputs.

Not every 1080p HDTV properly displays 1080p/24 sources, however. Most Blu-ray players, as well as the PlayStation 3, have a setting that lets the player transmit 1080p/24 video directly. Blu-ray Discs with movies that originate on film are encoded at 1080p/24 to preserve the proper cadence of film--that characteristic motion that's smooth but not too smooth. If your player is set to output 1080p/24 directly, and your TV can properly display it, you're seeing the image as close as possible to what the director intended--how it looks when displayed on a cinema screen from a film projector at your local movie theater.

Generally, for an HDTV to properly display 1080p/24 it needs to have a refresh rate at some multiple of 24. The standard refresh rate for HDTVs of all varieties is 60Hz, which is not a multiple of 24. There's no benefit to sending these displays 1080p/24 instead of 1080p/60. If the HDTV can actually show the signal (some cannot), the result usually looks the same regardless of the setting on your Blu-ray player.

On the other hand, increasing numbers of LCD TVs have refresh rates of 120Hz or 240Hz, for example, while a few plasmas refresh at 48Hz, 72Hz, or 96Hz. All are exact multiples of 24. Some of these HDTVs come closer to preserving the cadence of film than others, and some can introduce extra dejudder video processing (usually user defeatable) that also affects cadence. Unlike with resolution, there's no easy way to tell from the spec sheet if a display with a multiple of 24 as its refresh rate handles 1080p/24 correctly, although most such displays that we've tested do.

For most viewers the visible benefits of 1080p/24 are slight. Displays that cannot show it correctly can nonetheless produce a viable semblance of film's cadence, one that to experienced viewers appears to stutter slightly, especially in pans or camera movement, instead of move more smoothly like true film cadence. But for purists interested in seeing every last benefit of film, 1080p/24 signals mated to a 1080p/24-compatible display are worth the investment.
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html

Last edited by petetherock; 23-05-2009 at 08:17 AM..
petetherock is offline  
Old 23-05-2009, 08:14 AM   #25
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Contrast Ratio

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-...ag=hdtv;hdtv_l


At the 2009 Consumer Electronics Show, manufacturers quoted contrast ratio specs of 1,000,000:1 or 2,000,000:1 for upcoming LED-based LCD displays (Vizio and LG, respectively), which are similar to the specs quoted by Samsung and Sony for their current LED models. Those numbers sure do sound impressive, but what do they mean in the real world?
Very little. It's true that in general, a higher contrast ratio can indicate that the display produces a deeper level of black, with all of the picture-quality benefits that brings--but then again it might not. Despite the million-to-one contrast ratios of the Samsung and Sony LED sets we reviewed, we observed better black-level performance in the Pioneer PRO-111FD. Pioneer doesn't publish a contrast ratio spec for that television, but has claimed that its black levels are so deep as to be "immeasurable."


Manufacturers are free to use whatever method they like to "measure" the contrast ratio of their displays. The big numbers you see quoted most often are for "dynamic" contrast ratio, which takes into account changes the (usually LCD) display makes to adjust for fluctuations in the brightness of the content--namely, lowering the backlight in dark scenes and bringing it up in lighter ones. Then there's the "native" contrast ratio number, always much smaller than the dynamic one, where the display doesn't perform these adjustments. Both of these numbers are usually derived from the measurement of a full-white screen and a full-black screen (so-called full-on, full-off measurements), which is obviously not representative of actual program material.
That's why we hope you'll pay as little attention to published contrast ratio specs as we do. We rarely mention them in reviews, and when we have to refer to them in news or blog posts we try to put them in context, comparing last year's specs from the same manufacturer with this year's, for example. We're still working on performing contrast ratio measurements ourselves as part of TV reviews, so look for that to happen this year. When it does, we doubt we'll publish anything close to "one million."
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 23-05-2009, 08:20 AM   #26
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
HDTV resolution

From CNET:

http://www.cnet.com/hdtv-resolution/?tag=mncol;txt

HDTV source resolutions
If you read those three axioms closely, you'll see that source is everything with HDTV. Or, as George Fueschel first said, "Garbage in, garbage out." High-definition sources today come in one of three different resolutions: 1080p, 1080i, and 720p. Comparing the latter two, 1080i has more lines and pixels than 720p, but 720p is a progressive-scan format that should deliver a smoother image that stays sharper during motion. 1080p combines the superior resolution of 1080i with the progressive-scan smoothness of 720p. True 1080p is restricted to Blu-ray, some video-on-demand sources and the latest video games, however, and none of the major networks has announced 1080p broadcasts.

HDTV source resolutions
If you read those three axioms closely, you'll see that source is everything with HDTV. Or, as George Fueschel first said, "Garbage in, garbage out." High-definition sources today come in one of three different resolutions: 1080p, 1080i, and 720p. Comparing the latter two, 1080i has more lines and pixels than 720p, but 720p is a progressive-scan format that should deliver a smoother image that stays sharper during motion. 1080p combines the superior resolution of 1080i with the progressive-scan smoothness of 720p. True 1080p is restricted to Blu-ray, some video-on-demand sources and the latest video games, however, and none of the major networks has announced 1080p broadcasts.
Despite the obvious difference in pixel count, 720p and 1080i both look great. In fact, unless you have a very large television and excellent source material, you'll have a hard time telling the difference between any of the HDTV resolutions. It's especially difficult to tell the difference between 1080i and 1080p sources. The difference between DVD and HDTV should be visible on most HDTVs, but especially on smaller sets, it's not nearly as drastic as the difference between standard TV and HDTV.
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html

Last edited by petetherock; 23-05-2009 at 08:23 AM..
petetherock is offline  
Old 23-05-2009, 08:53 AM   #27
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Burn in on plasmas

This article is very useful

http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6449_7-6844370-1.html


1.What exactly is burn-in?
Plasma, like tube TVs and older CRT rear-projection televisions, is a phosphor-based screen technology. Due to uneven wear on the phosphors, if you let a static image sit on your screen for too long, that image can end up leaving a ghost of itself behind--it appears burned in to the screen. The biggest potential for burn-in occurs when you have a high-contrast image--such as bright text set against a dark or black background--because some pixels are turned on to the max while others nearby are completely turned off.
A good example is when you watch 4:3 video on a widescreen display and have black bars framing the image on either side (the pillarbox effect). Also, you get black bars on the top and bottom of a picture when you watch 2.35:1 movies on a 16:9 display (letterbox), which is the standard aspect ratio for all HDTVs. Then, of course, there are the news and stock tickers that run across the bottom of the screen when you watch various news channels, including CNBC, Bloomberg, CNN, and ESPN.
Watch TV for a few hours with those images sitting there, and you could end up with an after-image of the bars or the ticker visible on other scenes. These after-images will be most evident when you're watching a brighter scene with the picture filling the whole screen.

4. Are there some simple tips to follow to prevent burn-in?
Our video guru, Senior Editor David Katzmaier, says the potential for burn-in is greatest during the first 100 or so hours of use, "during which time you should keep contrast low (less than 50 percent) and avoid showing static images or letterbox bars on the screen for hours at a time." He personally has a three-year-old 50-inch plasma at home and notices that, after his wife watches the TV in the 4:3 mode (with black bars on either side of the image) for hours on end with no widescreen shows, he sometimes detects those after-images of the bars. But they quickly go away when he watches material that fills the whole screen (or he convinces her to use the gray bars).
"I just don't worry about it," he says. "Yeah, you can get some image retention once in awhile if you look hard enough after hours of static images, but even then it's temporary, not permanent."
Update 02-29-2008: Thanks to some readers' comments below, we have a few other tips to help remove burn-in if it occurs. Commenter gmccnet got good results by recording bright static on a VCR and playing it for 24 hours to almost completely remove the after-image. You could also simply leave a normal, widescreen channel on overnight or longer--just make sure it isn't one that goes to color bars in the early-morning hours. Discovery HD Theater is a good choice.
7. So, if I have CNBC, CNN, ESPN, Fox News, or Bloomberg on all day long, is it a problem?
Look, if your primary use for your TV is watching stations that have stock or news tickers running on them eight hours a day, buy an LCD. The reason you want a plasma is because you can get a big-screen model (50 inches or larger) that offers deeper blacks and better off-axis viewing for less money than an LCD. And if you're a day trader sitting at home, playing the markets during the day and watching movies at night, get a small LCD for daytime use and a big plasma for nighttime viewing. End of story.
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 20-08-2009, 06:45 PM   #28
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
A good pdf file on what HDMI is:
http://www.dtvforum.info/index.php?a...e=post&id=7566
petetherock is offline  
Old 31-08-2009, 07:40 AM   #29
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Larger size TV threads:

http://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/sh....php?t=2376461
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Old 14-09-2009, 08:46 AM   #30
Moderator
 
petetherock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,467
Getting the best deal and what happens if you don't

We all want to have the bragging rights to the best deal, the lowest price.

Sometimes it happens but once we buy something, another person may get a better deal somewhere else, or as prices slide, so someone else will enjoy a lower price.

We should deal with it and move on. Thats life.


BUT if the price is unreasonable and we feel cheated, thats when we should seek redress.

Note - this is not for that $50-100 less which someone else scored over your deal. That means the other person has better bargaining skills.

First, approach the sales rep who dealt with you - that is also why is is important to note your saleman's name and contact. Particularly at a show, if you buy on the last day, make sure you get the branch that the sales person is normally working at.

It will also be important if something goes wrong with the set or there are missing accesories.

Next check with the sales manager or the store head. Note: you have no case if you paid little more or missed out on a freebie, again that is down to bargaining skills.

Finally CASE or even the police if it is really cheating, which is unlikely for displays unlike smaller items where you may get them from small operations that may fly by night.

The bigger companies would like to protect their reputation and bad press is not good for business. Emphasise this.

However they don't really care if you paid xx$ more with them compared to another company.

In such cases, just sit back and enjoy the sit.

Cheers


Moral of the story: Do Your Homework
__________________
POST YOUR QUESTIONS INSTEAD OF SENDING A PM



Use the Search Button and Read the Stickies!




My home theatre gear and my blog:

https://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2020...tup-22020.html
petetherock is offline  
Closed Thread
Important Forum Advisory Note
This forum is moderated by volunteer moderators who will react only to members' feedback on posts. Moderators are not employees or representatives of HWZ. Forum members and moderators are responsible for their own posts.

Please refer to our Terms of Service for more information.


Thread Tools

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On