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[Maylyn - Networking] ASUS Lyra Trio - Corner to Corner WiFi

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Old 19-03-2018, 11:49 AM   #16
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Hi, I need some help with setting up of Asus Lyra Trio which I bought from IT show yesterday. I have the following questions below:

Firstly, my home is connected with Cat-6 LAN cable from the fibre point to all the rooms and I want to connect the Lyra Trio x 3 to the LAN point in each room which supposedly to get full speed everywhere.


Q1 : Out of the 3 devices, is there a predetermined device which I have to setup as the first device? I cannot find a differences between the 3 devices in the box

Q2 : What is the correct method for setting up the second and third device? What I have done are as follows:
- Connect 1st device's WAN port to a router. Use the App to setup. This is easy
- Connect 2nd device's WAN port to the LAN port of the 1st device. Power ON and use the App to add the 2nd device
- Connect 3rd device's WAN Port to the LAN port of the 2nd device. Power ON and use the App to add the 3rd device
- After finished, I connect each of the device to the LAN port in each room
Are the above steps correct?

Q3 : I have some how managed to get it working but I am not if is correct. I am getting 2 devices with Cyan LED and one device with Green LED. From my guest, I think Green LED is correct but I am not able to find any manual from Asus website talking about this.

Q4 : I am able to get the follows speed
- up to 300-400mbps when I am near to the first device
- up to 300-400mbps when I am near to the device with Green LED
- up to 50mbps when I am near the device with Cyan LED
Is this correct?
This kind of setup should just install as many APs as possible. Recommended 1 AP per room. And a multiple POE switch at the main point to supply power to all cat6 port across your house. Guess a lot of users are sold to the "MESH" thingy but do not really understand under what circumstances should a mesh system be deployed and its limitations.
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Old 19-03-2018, 01:33 PM   #17
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In fact I agree with OP on using a mesh instead of an AP. An AP will give you unique SSID which is not ideal when the signal overlaps.

Mesh on the contrary is a better wifi option for overlapping coverage with just one SSID.

Mesh units do not mean it has to work over wireless backhaul and it’s a real misconception.

This kind of setup should just install as many APs as possible. Recommended 1 AP per room. And a multiple POE switch at the main point to supply power to all cat6 port across your house. Guess a lot of users are sold to the "MESH" thingy but do not really understand under what circumstances should a mesh system be deployed and its limitations.
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Old 19-03-2018, 01:57 PM   #18
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In fact I agree with OP on using a mesh instead of an AP. An AP will give you unique SSID which is not ideal when the signal overlaps.

Mesh on the contrary is a better wifi option for overlapping coverage with just one SSID.

Mesh units do not mean it has to work over wireless backhaul and it’s a real misconception.

You do not need to set individual unique SSIDs for APs you can give all your APs the same ssid.

WiFi signal should have overlap but not too much so as to ensure device roam from one AP to another seamlessly. Too much overlapping causes the client device to hang on to the AP even when it is not the nearest one.

To prevent signal "overlapping" too much you can manually lower down the broadcast power of your APs. Higher end APs from Cisco, Aruba etc automate this feature so as to not be a problem when setting up 100s of APs.

Consumer grade APs and even ubiquiti does not have this feature yet you have to manually set broadcast strength. However in a home setting it should not be much of an issue.

another point for APs against mesh is actuall roaming support. Most higher end APs like ubiquiti support 802.11r and k which is to help compatible device roam seamlessly from one AP to another.
I don't think most consumer mesh units support it and it's "seamless roaming" is just the client device moving from one AP to the other. Without 802.11r/k you will find some devices roaming easily while other devices especially older apple devices hanging on to the weaker mesh node instead of roaming.

Last edited by dryteletubby; 19-03-2018 at 02:05 PM..
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Old 19-03-2018, 02:31 PM   #19
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Manually adjusting signal strength does not allow devices to roam but merely confuse the devices. As some devices do have algorithms to prevent constant connection to one particular weak AP, they have what is called a preconfigured bounce time. Nevertheless even if you can successfully roam from one ap to another, in between will have a momentary drop in wifi connection.

Whereas for mesh, there will not be any drop from one node to another node and that’s not roaming protocol as well.

You mentioned the roaming protocol which is only available in some high end consumer ap or enterprise grade ap, that works for big houses where mesh units will not be suitable due to the limited addition of nodes.



You do not need to set individual unique SSIDs for APs you can give all your APs the same ssid.

WiFi signal should have overlap but not too much so as to ensure device roam from one AP to another seamlessly. Too much overlapping causes the client device to hang on to the AP even when it is not the nearest one.

To prevent signal "overlapping" too much you can manually lower down the broadcast power of your APs. Higher end APs from Cisco, Aruba etc automate this feature so as to not be a problem when setting up 100s of APs.

Consumer grade APs and even ubiquiti does not have this feature yet you have to manually set broadcast strength. However in a home setting it should not be much of an issue.

another point for APs against mesh is actuall roaming support. Most higher end APs like ubiquiti support 802.11r and k which is to help compatible device roam seamlessly from one AP to another.
I don't think most consumer mesh units support it and it's "seamless roaming" is just the client device moving from one AP to the other. Without 802.11r/k you will find some devices roaming easily while other devices especially older apple devices hanging on to the weaker mesh node instead of roaming.
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Old 19-03-2018, 02:40 PM   #20
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I have a wifi router at the living room but it was not enough to reach my bedroom. So I added an access point in the bedroom connecting to the Lan point at bedroom. It works but I need to manually switch the wifi SSID when ever i walk in and out of my bedroom to living room. So i decided to give this wifi mesh a try.

After asking some questions at IT show, I was told that I can connect the Wifi mesh devices to existing LAN point, so called ethernet backhaul, and I will be able to move around the house freely without having to switch the wifi SSID manually and yet get full wifi speed everywhere.

Am I being smoked?
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Old 19-03-2018, 02:41 PM   #21
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Manually adjusting signal strength does not allow devices to roam but merely confuse the devices. As some devices do have algorithms to prevent constant connection to one particular weak AP, they have what is called a preconfigured bounce time. Nevertheless even if you can successfully roam from one ap to another, in between will have a momentary drop in wifi connection.

Whereas for mesh, there will not be any drop from one node to another node and that’s not roaming protocol as well.

You mentioned the roaming protocol which is only available in some high end consumer ap or enterprise grade ap, that works for big houses where mesh units will not be suitable due to the limited addition of nodes.



Most new devices are "smart" enough to choose the best node/AP to connect to. Roaming issues only happen with older devices that was not engineered "correctly"

I went to my friend's house with a 3 node Linksys velop system. He has issues with a older tablet not roaming. I used a iperf and a laptop to test it's roaming capabilities and noticed it cut off for a few seconds when moving around his house. This may not be an issue under normal use cases anyway. And the solution for the tablet to roam is to disconnect and reconnect it's WiFi when moving around the house.

I Google preconfigured bounce time and did not find anything relevant

Last edited by dryteletubby; 19-03-2018 at 02:49 PM..
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Old 19-03-2018, 02:47 PM   #22
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I have a wifi router at the living room but it was not enough to reach my bedroom. So I added an access point in the bedroom connecting to the Lan point at bedroom. It works but I need to manually switch the wifi SSID when ever i walk in and out of my bedroom to living room. So i decided to give this wifi mesh a try.

After asking some questions at IT show, I was told that I can connect the Wifi mesh devices to existing LAN point, so called ethernet backhaul, and I will be able to move around the house freely without having to switch the wifi SSID manually and yet get full wifi speed everywhere.

Am I being smoked?
What they say is true you can use ethernet. Backhaul to connect the mesh nodes ( I think) and you will get 1 SSID so no need to manually switch.

You also can do this without the mesh system by setting your ap SSID to the same as your main router.
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Old 19-03-2018, 02:49 PM   #23
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Manually adjusting signal strength does not allow devices to roam but merely confuse the devices. As some devices do have algorithms to prevent constant connection to one particular weak AP, they have what is called a preconfigured bounce time. Nevertheless even if you can successfully roam from one ap to another, in between will have a momentary drop in wifi connection.

Whereas for mesh, there will not be any drop from one node to another node and thatís not roaming protocol as well.

You mentioned the roaming protocol which is only available in some high end consumer ap or enterprise grade ap, that works for big houses where mesh units will not be suitable due to the limited addition of nodes.




I tried installing APs and with the same SSID as the main router the last time
I faced the following problem:
1. My phone do not switch to a strong wifi AP unless the signal to the existing wifi connection drops to a certain extent
2. If I were to switch the wifi SSID manually, connection to ethernet is lost. I need to turn on and off my phone wifi.

I think the above is before of my poor knowledge on setting up wifi networking.. So I decided to give wifi mesh a try..
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Last edited by kwekey; 19-03-2018 at 02:50 PM.. Reason: spelling mistake
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Old 19-03-2018, 02:52 PM   #24
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I tried installing APs and with the same SSID as the main router the last time
I faced the following problem:
1. My phone do not switch to a strong wifi AP unless the signal to the existing wifi connection drops to a certain extent
That is normal. You can coax your phone to switch to a stronger network by making the singnal strength between your 2 WiFi points more significant by lowering the WiFi broadcast power.
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Old 19-03-2018, 02:56 PM   #25
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That is normal. You can coax your phone to switch to a stronger network by making the singnal strength between your 2 WiFi points more significant by lowering the WiFi broadcast power.
That is tough for me
I am not that familiar with tweeting wifi signal..

And I have already broke my bank on the Asus Lyra Trio Wifi mesh.
So I hope to move on with Asus Lyra Trio.

Hope to get some good information regarding my questions..
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Last edited by kwekey; 19-03-2018 at 02:57 PM.. Reason: add infromation
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Old 19-03-2018, 03:08 PM   #26
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That is tough for me
I am not that familiar with tweeting wifi signal..

And I have already broke my bank on the Asus Lyra Trio Wifi mesh.
So I hope to move on with Asus Lyra Trio.

Hope to get some good information regarding my questions..
Asus customer service usually quite helpful for this sort of setup.

I heard that the mesh units need to be daisy chained to work and can't connect 2 units back to the same mesh. I may be wrong and better to ask Asus about it.
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Old 19-03-2018, 05:28 PM   #27
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As far as I know, Lyra trio supports AP mode, so the nodes can individually connect to router of the user. Need not daisy chain unless one is running router mode..

Asus customer service usually quite helpful for this sort of setup.

I heard that the mesh units need to be daisy chained to work and can't connect 2 units back to the same mesh. I may be wrong and better to ask Asus about it.
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Old 19-03-2018, 06:23 PM   #28
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I have a wifi router at the living room but it was not enough to reach my bedroom. So I added an access point in the bedroom connecting to the Lan point at bedroom. It works but I need to manually switch the wifi SSID when ever i walk in and out of my bedroom to living room. So i decided to give this wifi mesh a try.

After asking some questions at IT show, I was told that I can connect the Wifi mesh devices to existing LAN point, so called ethernet backhaul, and I will be able to move around the house freely without having to switch the wifi SSID manually and yet get full wifi speed everywhere.

Am I being smoked?
Both sides have a point but mesh is simpler to setup, less to tweak. Setup and forget.

My 2 cents
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Old 19-03-2018, 10:58 PM   #29
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Hi, I need some help with setting up of Asus Lyra Trio which I bought from IT show yesterday. I have the following questions below:

Firstly, my home is connected with Cat-6 LAN cable from the fibre point to all the rooms and I want to connect the Lyra Trio x 3 to the LAN point in each room which supposedly to get full speed everywhere.


Spoiler!

Is this correct?

Q1. Nope, all nodes are the same
Q2. AFAIK, add all nodes wirelessly, then connect node to respective ethernet data point
Q3. Should be all Cyan by right
Q4. I think you should redo the node with 50Mbps
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Old 20-03-2018, 11:57 AM   #30
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Hi, I need some help with setting up of Asus Lyra Trio which I bought from IT show yesterday. I have the following questions below:

Firstly, my home is connected with Cat-6 LAN cable from the fibre point to all the rooms and I want to connect the Lyra Trio x 3 to the LAN point in each room which supposedly to get full speed everywhere.


Q1 : Out of the 3 devices, is there a predetermined device which I have to setup as the first device? I cannot find a differences between the 3 devices in the box

Q2 : What is the correct method for setting up the second and third device? What I have done are as follows:
- Connect 1st device's WAN port to a router. Use the App to setup. This is easy
- Connect 2nd device's WAN port to the LAN port of the 1st device. Power ON and use the App to add the 2nd device
- Connect 3rd device's WAN Port to the LAN port of the 2nd device. Power ON and use the App to add the 3rd device
- After finished, I connect each of the device to the LAN port in each room
Are the above steps correct?

Q3 : I have some how managed to get it working but I am not if is correct. I am getting 2 devices with Cyan LED and one device with Green LED. From my guest, I think Green LED is correct but I am not able to find any manual from Asus website talking about this.

Q4 : I am able to get the follows speed
- up to 300-400mbps when I am near to the first device
- up to 300-400mbps when I am near to the device with Green LED
- up to 50mbps when I am near the device with Cyan LED
Is this correct?
Q1 ~ None, you can use any of the ASUS Lyra Trio to set it as main (wired to router).

Q2 ~ This method is setting up via Ethernet Backhaul, you can do Wireless Backhaul as well like what i have posted on the first page.

Q3 ~ Your LED status is correct for Ethernet Backhaul setup (main ~ light cyan, second ~ solid green and third ~ solid green).

Info ~> https://www.asus.com/us/support/FAQ/1034951/

For Wireless BackHaul - (main ~ light cyan, second ~ light cyan and third light cyan).
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Last edited by maylyn; 20-03-2018 at 12:06 PM..
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