HWZ Forums

Login Register FAQ Mark Forums Read

*Official* BBCWatcher club

Like Tree133Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 15-09-2018, 09:35 PM   #661
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 653
This is a large cap, actively managed, expensive (0.7%/year) U.S. stock market fund. Fortunately it has performed quite well over the past several years, so if youíve been holding it for a while, congratulations.


This is a NASDAQ-heavy, actively managed, expensive (0.81%/year) U.S. stock market fund. Same thing, with even higher performance over the past several years.


An actively managed, expensive (0.73%/year) fund that invests in healthcare sector stocks. Same thing: congratulations if you bought this a while ago and held onto it.


An actively managed, expensive (0.78%/year) fund that invests in U.S. retail sector stocks. Same thing again.

Basically you bet heavily on the U.S. stock market, and doubled down on some high flying sectors and companies within the U.S. stock market, and that all did well. High risk, high reward (in a bull market when a monkey throwing darts did pretty well). The fund manager (Fidelity) collected a pretty big share of your paper winnings, but since the U.S. stock market has been on such an amazing bull run, you should have done quite well, on paper so far.

The retail sector overall hasnít been stellar, but it looks like the fund managers basically threw all in (just about) on Amazon and on dollar stores, and that mix worked. They notably didnít bet much on Sears, J.C. Penney, Tandy (Radio Shack), and Toys R Us, as counter examples.
Yes, these have done fairly well it seems. But do you reckon I should continue to hold these or at least the US$s in the US, or potentially move them to S$ here where I now am, or elsewhere. I suppose that's the question that I had top of my mind.

I have not remarried. I have a regular job, nothing too extravagant, less than US$75K p.a. but perfectly good for condominium rental and a decent standard of living.

The reason I didn't get IRA/401(k) in the US is because I was always a consultant without benefits. My spouse had a regular job that gave us all health and dental, and life insurance and the rest. She built up her retirement accounts whereas I invested the surplus in US equity. Don't ask how it happened - I have no idea myself - other than the insurance, all our assets were maintained separately. Since she had the regular job, the house and its mortgage were in her name.

I moved here in mid/late 2016 after I got a job here. Filed 2015 taxes because I had had taxable US income in 2015, claimed the child tax credit that year. I have only had bank interest and capital gains to count as "income" in 2016-2017. And have repatriated nothing, although I was recently thinking about it. Of course that was the whole conversation about holding on the US$!

I had income for 10 years in the US. Filed returns with the IRS every single year. Yes, I have a SSN. And yes, my brokerage and bank accounts have a US address.

Last edited by vegavega25; 15-09-2018 at 09:46 PM..
vegavega25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2018, 10:02 PM   #662
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 653
, are you aware of the U.S. Additional Child Tax Credit and how it operates? I have to check the details again, but if your income is not too high then your U.S. citizen child should be eligible for US$1,000 per year in free money from the IRS ó and possibly more going forward. This is one of the weird, quirky, happy aspects of global taxation associated with U.S. personhood.

I believe the way it works (for tax year 2017 and prior) is as follows. Letís assume that you have not remarried, and your U.S. citizen child is living with you in Singapore at least most of the year. That should make you a ďHead of HouseholdĒ tax filer, which then means if you have an adjusted gross income (AGI) of US$75,000 or less, bingo, US$1,000 in free money. If that free money has gone unclaimed then itís collectable up to 3 years after the original due date for the tax form. The due date is June 15 for those living overseas, so thatíd mean the free money is still recoverable for tax years 2015, 2016, and 2017. (The 2015 tax return was due on June 15, 2016, and weíre less than 3 years away from that date as I write this.) Of course, if your child wasnít alive at any time in 2015, that doesnít count.

On edit: Before you get too excited, this isnít going to work particularly well in Singapore in many scenarios. Itís very, very speculative and will depend on the nature of your income. Singapore is a comparatively low income tax country, and thatís not helpful for trying to grab this free money. However, even if it doesnít work now, if in the future you move to a comparatively high income tax country with your child (while still a child under age 17), thisíll become interesting and relevant, probably.
https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tips/family/what-is-the-additional-child-tax-credit/L4IBvQted

2015 was the last calendar year that I had in excess of US$3000 income in the US, or a US tax bill in excess of US$3000. As a non US citizen or greencard holder, I have no reason to declare my Singapore income to the IRS, do I? As far as I can tell, no federal or state US tax has been withheld by Fidelity or Vanguard such that I need a refund. But if I need to file 1042NR or some such form for 2016 and 2017 to simply declare my bank account interest and capital gains, I can do so, irrespective of the child tax credit considerations.

Last edited by vegavega25; 15-09-2018 at 10:06 PM..
vegavega25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2018, 10:15 PM   #663
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 391
If there's a dividend holding tax on etf funds with us holdings, will unit trusts or synthetic ETFs be able to avoid these taxes?
ftpofmpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2018, 11:59 PM   #664
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,335
If there's a dividend holding tax on etf funds with us holdings, will unit trusts or synthetic ETFs be able to avoid these taxes?
There is a dividend tax on U.S. stock dividends. The question is the tax rate. If the fund is domiciled in a country that has a lower treaty rate -- Ireland and Luxembourg are such examples -- then a non-U.S. person holding shares of that fund can typically enjoy the benefits of that lower rate. (I say "typically" because your country of residence if not Singapore may have other ideas in its tax code.)

Yes, these have done fairly well it seems. But do you reckon I should continue to hold these or at least the US$s in the US, or potentially move them to S$ here where I now am, or elsewhere. I suppose that's the question that I had top of my mind.
I don't think there's any particular reason to shift those funds to Singapore in Singapore dollars since (I assume) you don't have a right of abode in Singapore. Money isn't like your favorite pair of socks. You don't have to move money when you move.

So I'd just cross that sort of thinking off your list right away. Focus on what use(s) you intend for these funds. What are your life goals that you want these funds to support? You alluded to providing for your child's future higher education as a possibility. Is that how you'd like these particular funds deployed?

I have not remarried. I have a regular job, nothing too extravagant, less than US$75K p.a. but perfectly good for condominium rental and a decent standard of living.
OK, since you worked in the U.S. for at least 10 years you should have at least 10 years of U.S. Social Security contributions. That means you should be eligible for some level of U.S. Social Security retirement benefits. Under current rules that means you can receive a U.S. dollar pension starting as early as age 62 and as late as age 70. The longer you wait, the higher the monthly benefit amount.

In certain cases you may be eligible for a spousal benefit, which is half of your ex-spouse's U.S. Social Security retirement benefit. The spousal benefit can start as early as your age 62 and as late as your age 70, also with a higher monthly benefit the longer you wait. If the spousal benefit is higher than what you would qualify for under your own earnings history, then you would collect the spousal benefit.

However, before jumping up and down for joy, there are some important caveats:

1. U.S. Social Security cannot pay benefits to citizens of a few countries.

2. U.S. Social Security cannot pay benefits to bank accounts in a few countries.

3. To qualify for spousal benefits you must remain unmarried, and your marriage to your ex-spouse must have lasted at least 10 years.

Yes, this is a bit odd, that remarriage (same sex or opposite sex -- any legal marriage) could be expensive. But that's how the current rules work. If you're contemplating marriage, now or in the future, I recommend taking a careful look at the financial impact. Whatever decision you make is probably fine, but it's still useful and important to know what if any financial impact there would be.

The reason I didn't get IRA/401(k) in the US is because I was always a consultant without benefits.
Right, that explains the lack of a typical 401(k), which is employer sponsored. It doesn't explain the lack of a Solo 401(k) or IRA.

My spouse had a regular job that gave us all health and dental, and life insurance and the rest. She built up her retirement accounts whereas I invested the surplus in US equity. Don't ask how it happened - I have no idea myself - other than the insurance, all our assets were maintained separately. Since she had the regular job, the house and its mortgage were in her name.
It's water under the bridge now, but that was a financial planning error. You should have been investing your savings via an Individual Retirement Account (IRA). A Roth IRA would have been completely U.S. tax free if held until retirement.

I'm fairly surprised this never occurred to anyone at any point during your 10+ years in the United States. Oh well, let's see if I can help you recover a bit....

I moved here in mid/late 2016 after I got a job here. Filed 2015 taxes because I had had taxable US income in 2015, claimed the child tax credit that year. I have only had bank interest and capital gains to count as "income" in 2016-2017. And have repatriated nothing, although I was recently thinking about it. Of course that was the whole conversation about holding on the US$!
You were in the United States for a long time. Did you file/were you required to file IRS Form 8854? You are required to do so to exit the U.S. tax system cleanly if you are a "long-term resident" (LTR), but that hinges on permanent residency. If you were in the United States on H-1B status, for example, then you probably weren't a LTR.

I had income for 10 years in the US. Filed returns with the IRS every single year. Yes, I have a SSN. And yes, my brokerage and bank accounts have a US address.
OK.

2015 was the last calendar year that I had in excess of US$3000 income in the US, or a US tax bill in excess of US$3000. As a non US citizen or greencard holder, I have no reason to declare my Singapore income to the IRS, do I?
As a former green card holder (if you were), maybe. That's why I'm asking about IRS Form 8854.

Did you file a "dual status" tax return for tax year 2015, which includes both a "1040" and a "1040NR"?

As far as I can tell, no federal or state US tax has been withheld by Fidelity or Vanguard such that I need a refund.
OK, next question: have you filed IRS Form W-8BEN with Fidelity and with Vanguard? The lack of withholding is a problem, actually. Dividends should be subject to 30% tax withholding.

But if I need to file 1042NR or some such form for 2016 and 2017 to simply declare my bank account interest and capital gains, I can do so, irrespective of the child tax credit considerations.
It seems you have some U.S. tax tidying up to do (don't panic!), but I'll reserve judgment pending more answers. However, the Social Security part is unambiguously good news.

I should also add that you should be qualified for U.S. Medicare based on your 10+ years working in the United States. That doesn't mean much, except that a couple months before your 65th birthday you can sign up for free Medicare Part A, which is basic hospitalization insurance in the U.S. You'll still want to get some travel medical insurance whenever you visit the United States, but having a Medicare Part A card will give you some extra insurance protection beyond what an age 65+ person can buy for travel medical insurance. So it's a nice little bonus when you're on vacation visiting the future grandkids your U.S. citizen child is raising in the United States (as a possible future scenario).

Last edited by BBCWatcher; 16-09-2018 at 12:10 AM..
BBCWatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2018, 12:29 AM   #665
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 8,422
If there's a dividend holding tax on etf funds with us holdings, will unit trusts or synthetic ETFs be able to avoid these taxes?
No.

There used to be a few excitingly weird tax dodges that large, actively managed funds could pull off using total-return swaps, or by lending out the stock over the ex date (though that was more for European stocks). The respective tax agencies have gotten wise to these, though, and come down on them like a ton of bricks.
Shiny Things is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2018, 05:34 PM   #666
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 163
Hi BBCW,

What are your views on the new product - Lionglobal All Season fund which boast 0.5% total expense ratio (TER)? Are annual management fees included in the TER?

Look forward to your advice on the product.
Muneyzmart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2018, 05:57 PM   #667
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 6,312
Hi BBCW,

What are your views on the new product - Lionglobal All Season fund which boast 0.5% total expense ratio (TER)? Are annual management fees included in the TER?

Look forward to your advice on the product.
In before BBCW says to do your own investing rather than do some funds which requires you to pay the middlemen.
JuniorLion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2018, 08:54 PM   #668
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,335
What are your views on the new product - Lionglobal All Season fund which boast 0.5% total expense ratio (TER)? Are annual management fees included in the TER?
In before BBCW says to do your own investing rather than do some funds which requires you to pay the middlemen.
Hereís a possible surprise: I think the LionGlobal All Seasons Fund (Growth) looks pretty decent for the long-term investor, with the following caveats:

1. You must use a zero fee platform to buy it, i.e. DollarDex, POEMS, or FSMOne (in no particular order). That helps you avoid the usual 2% sales charge.

2. It is not appropriate for U.S. persons.

3. Itís best suited for savers/investors who are just starting out and who donít have a lot of dollars to invest ó but who will still save regularly (monthly, preferably). This fund allows a $100 minimum, which is great.

4. I would not mix this fund with ES3 or G3B ó itís not necessary. It looks like it already contains an overweighting of Singapore stocks. Thatís a bit hard to judge since I havenít seen any asset details yet, but it looks that way. They do appear to be using popular Irish domiciled funds to construct their fund, and thatís good.

5. It would be a good fit within a Supplementary Retirement Scheme (SRS) account.

I wish the total expense ratio (TER) of 0.5% were even lower, but 0.5% is major progress for unit trusts in Singapore.
BBCWatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2018, 09:03 PM   #669
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 261
Any views on NDIA (India etf) or EIDO (Indonesia ETF)?
theokcoral is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2018, 09:26 PM   #670
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,335
Any views on NDIA (India etf) or EIDO (Indonesia ETF)?
I completely ignore single country (or even regional) funds, with the possible exception of the single country that you expect will be your future retirement country. So if youíre planning to retire in India or in Indonesia, then those funds might be interesting, to a degree.
BBCWatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-09-2018, 06:49 AM   #671
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 653
I don't think there's any particular reason to shift those funds to Singapore in Singapore dollars since (I assume) you don't have a right of abode in Singapore. Money isn't like your favorite pair of socks. You don't have to move money when you move.

So I'd just cross that sort of thinking off your list right away. Focus on what use(s) you intend for these funds. What are your life goals that you want these funds to support? You alluded to providing for your child's future higher education as a possibility. Is that how you'd like these particular funds deployed?
Yes. So that means I should retain those investments in their current form and therefore the monies in the US? Got it.

OK, since you worked in the U.S. for at least 10 years you should have at least 10 years of U.S. Social Security contributions. That means you should be eligible for some level of U.S. Social Security retirement benefits.
Yup, know this.

It doesn't explain the lack of a Solo 401(k) or IRA.

It's water under the bridge now, but that was a financial planning error. You should have been investing your savings via an Individual Retirement Account (IRA). A Roth IRA would have been completely U.S. tax free if held until retirement.
Got to admit this never came up in any conversation. Can I do it now?

You were in the United States for a long time. Did you file/were you required to file IRS Form 8854? You are required to do so to exit the U.S. tax system cleanly if you are a "long-term resident" (LTR), but that hinges on permanent residency. If you were in the United States on H-1B status, for example, then you probably weren't a LTR.
No, I wasn't a LTR, on H-1B and then a G4 and so did not file 8854.

Did you file a "dual status" tax return for tax year 2015, which includes both a "1040" and a "1040NR"?
1040 only.

OK, next question: have you filed IRS Form W-8BEN with Fidelity and with Vanguard? The lack of withholding is a problem, actually. Dividends should be subject to 30% tax withholding.
I did when I opened the accounts. Not after.
vegavega25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-09-2018, 09:19 AM   #672
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,335
Yes. So that means I should retain those investments in their current form and therefore the monies in the US? Got it.
Not quite. Those particular funds are currently in a very aggressive posture. That’s probably OK if your child is ~8 or more years away from university, but as university expenses get nearer you’ll want those funds to be positioned differently.

If you can open a “529” account, and move some funds in there, into an automatic “target”-style fund (I’d advise), that’d be great. All gains, including dividends, would be tax free...provided the funds are used directly, with the educational institution, for qualified education expenses. That can be as early as secondary school tuition (recent tax rule change). For universities the institution must be on the U.S. Department of Education’s federal student loan/federal financial aid list. Something like 99% of U.S. colleges and universities are, and the ones that aren’t you probably wouldn’t want your child attending. There are also many overseas institutions that are on the list, but it’s spotty. “Study abroad” programs are allowed so, for example, your child could attend a German university — just picking a random example here — and then spend one year in a “study abroad” program at New York University, and use these funds at NYU.

If this idea interests you, just let me know and I’ll investigate whether it’s possible for a non-U.S. person (but with SSN and U.S. mailing address) to open a 529 for a U.S. citizen beneficiary.

Got to admit this never came up in any conversation. Can I do it now?
No, contribution deadlines for U.S. tax-advantaged retirement accounts have passed. For example, the contribution deadline for an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) is April 15 in the calendar year following the year of contribution. So right now qualified individuals and families can make IRA contributions for 2018, and they have until April 15, 2019, to do it, but it’s too late to make contributions for 2017 and prior.

It’s water under the bridge, I’m afraid. The “529” is a possible way to rescue some tax benefits going forward, if you think it’s a good idea and if it’s possible to open one.

No, I wasn't a LTR, on H-1B and then a G4 and so did not file 8854.
OK, that’s a relief. So you were married to a U.S. citizen spouse, living in the U.S., and never applied for a green card (spouse never filed a USCIS I-130 petition)? AND had a child together, born in the U.S., who’s now living with you? And somehow never heard about IRAs for 10+ years? Interesting combination! Donald Trump’s head is exploding right now.

1040 only.
That’s allowed, as I recall. I believe you’re allowed to treat your exit year as a whole year of residence for tax purposes. I was just curious, really.

I did when I opened the accounts. Not after.
OK, here’s where I have some residual concerns. You need to check the 1099-DIV statements from Fidelity and Vanguard (and any other U.S. financial accounts you have) to see whether there was proper 30% withholding of dividend tax. For 2015 you’re presumably OK since you filed a 1040, reported that income, and it got taxed at U.S. resident rates. For 2016 onward you should be subject to 30% dividend tax withholding. When you exited the United States you should have filed IRS Form W-8BEN (again) with your financial institutions so that they are properly withholding. That’s because your status changed, and so did the tax rate/treatment. If you log onto those accounts it should be possible to check whether you have a W-9 (not correct) or W-8BEN (correct) on file.

....But don’t panic if that didn’t happen. Just do it now, and then you’ll need to tidy up the underwithholding with the IRS. I think you can do that with 1040NRs, maybe even 1040NR-EZs. There will be some modest interest and penalties on any underwithholding, but it won’t be too bad.

The IRS will eventually catch this (since 1099 matching is easy), so it’s important to clean it up before interest and penalties accrue too much. There’s something called the Streamlined Offshore Program that you could try to use — it doesn’t hurt to try, if you wish to try — which waives penalties if you’re approved. If you’re not approved, then you pay the standard penalty.

So what are we talking about here in terms of damages if your dividend tax wasn’t withheld properly? Well, the IRS interest rate over almost all of this period was only 4%/year. It very recently (this year) increased to a still modest 5%/year. Penalties (if they apply) are 0.5%/month but capped at 25%, and by my math you haven’t even reached the cap yet since the underwithholding (if any) only goes back as far as 2016. So this is not the end of the world even if the withholding wasn’t correct, but you certainly do want to get it cleaned up if the tax was not properly withheld.

The good news is that a non-U.S. person is not subject to capital gains. (Dividend tax up, capital gains tax down.) So whenever you decide to sell these funds, the gains should be U.S. tax free. But evidently Fidelity and Vanguard don’t know that detail either, so they’d dutifully report sale proceeds to the IRS as if you were a U.S. person still. And the IRS would, eventually, say “WTF?” and come calling.

Oh, there’s another detail I should probably mention. As a non-U.S. person the U.S. estate tax exemption has fallen to US$60,000. If these are your only U.S. estate taxable assets, and if they are valued at under US$60,000, then no U.S. estate tax will be owed when you die. Note that U.S. bank accounts and a few other assets don’t count toward this $60,000 figure. If you are above your exemption, though, you might want to give this issue some thought. I’ll have to do some checking, but it’s possible that a “529” could effectively bypass the U.S. estate tax, to some degree anyway. So that could be a nice side benefit if a “529” is possible to open.
BBCWatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-09-2018, 04:43 PM   #673
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 513
Hi BBCW,

What are your views on the new product - Lionglobal All Season fund which boast 0.5% total expense ratio (TER)? Are annual management fees included in the TER?

Look forward to your advice on the product.
My 2 cents.

Our strategy seeks to combine the benefits of passive and active investing. The Fund will utilize active managers in markets that are less efficient where there are opportunities for outperformance and passive ETFs where markets are more efficient.
Coincidentally, these markets that are less efficient with opportunities for outperformance are precisely the ones that LionGlobal is actively managing separate funds for. They utilise passive ETFs where markets are more efficient (namely with the S&P 500 and Euro STOXX 50)... But I wouldn't be surprised if they take the view, should they create active funds in those markets, that those markets now have opportunities for outperformance through active management.

I'm not sure if it is true that these funds have outperformed their passive counterparts through both up and down market cycles; does anyone know?

Instead of following the typical market capitalization benchmark allocation, we are utilizing GDP-weighted equity allocation. Our view is that global equity allocation based on market capitalization is concentrated in US equity and is not reflective of global GDP contribution. A GDP-weighted equity allocation better captures the growth potential of growth areas in the world for example, China.
Coincidentally, this practice also puts more of the money into the funds that they are managing. Coincidences always make me suspicious...

I also wrote a bit on the GDP-based allocation and 0.50% TER in https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/1...-post1745.html




If 0.50% TER were acceptable, a bunch of robo-advisors might also qualify for consideration. In particular, uob utraderobo uses the popular Ireland-domiciled funds as well, although some of the above concerns above apply as well. How would utraderobo compare?
salmonella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-09-2018, 05:12 PM   #674
Supremacy Member
 
revhappy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 5,353
I also overweighted emerging markets and Europe in my portfolio. That hasn't worked out well so far this year. But maybe long term, it will work out. Who knows.

Sent from Dont Take Any Of My Statment As Investment Advice. Do Your Own Due Diligence. using GAGT
revhappy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-09-2018, 06:29 PM   #675
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 653
The ď529Ē is a possible way to rescue some tax benefits going forward, if you think itís a good idea and if itís possible to open one.
In fact 529 was something I had been advised to do, but then 2015-2016 were far too tumultuous, and the equity funds were doing well, so I never got around to doing that.

OK, thatís a relief. So you were married to a U.S. citizen spouse, living in the U.S., and never applied for a green card (spouse never filed a USCIS I-130 petition)? AND had a child together, born in the U.S., whoís now living with you? And somehow never heard about IRAs for 10+ years? Interesting combination! Donald Trumpís head is exploding right now.
Anything to have DJT's head explode Spouse was not a US citizen earlier, but is likely to be in the foreseeable future.

OK, hereís where I have some residual concerns. You need to check the 1099-DIV statements from Fidelity and Vanguard (and any other U.S. financial accounts you have) to see whether there was proper 30% withholding of dividend tax.
Checked, and there hasn't been.

Shall I update my status by filing a new W8-BEN rightaway? (https://www.fidelity.com/customer-se...foreign-status)

I notice that the dividends paid out and reinvested are small amounts. Capital gains accrued are clearly higher. I am not averse to the dividend withholding tax, in principle. And that means I should then file 1040-NR starting the year (I am guessing it will be 2018?) that tax starts getting withheld? (As a side note, 1040-NR EZ doesn't allow for dependents or for dividends/capital gains.)

There is no place in https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/fw8ben.pdf to indicate that I became a non-US persons starting when or since when.

My related question is: how do I in fact get Fidelity and Vanguard to now retroactively deduct the correct withholding tax for 2016 and 2017, and get them to report it directly to IRS?

Oh, thereís another detail I should probably mention. As a non-U.S. person the U.S. estate tax exemption has fallen to US$60,000. If these are your only U.S. estate taxable assets, and if they are valued at under US$60,000, then no U.S. estate tax will be owed when you die. Note that U.S. bank accounts and a few other assets donít count toward this $60,000 figure.
Lets come back to this. Good that US bank account don't count, but that probably means I should rethink further investments of the non-529 nature.
vegavega25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Important Forum Advisory Note
This forum is moderated by volunteer moderators who will react only to members' feedback on posts. Moderators are not employees or representatives of HWZ. Forum members and moderators are responsible for their own posts.

Please refer to our Terms of Service for more information.


Thread Tools

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On