www.hardwarezone.com.sg


www.hardwarezone.com.sg (/)
-   Money Mind (https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/money-mind-210/)
-   -   *Official* BBCWatcher club (https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/money-mind-210/%2Aofficial%2A-bbcwatcher-club-5855578.html)

foozgarden 29-06-2018 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boringLife- (Post 115211725)
Regarding term life do you guys purchase from agent or direct? The premium for direct is cheaper but I hope that in the event of my demise, having an agent will enable the claims process to be smoother.


cheaper coz u cut out the middle man.

but, DPI only up to 400k.. if you need more than that, u have to go thru agent
and i read somewhere that the for DPI CIs, it doesnt cover the full 37 CI list (this needs to be confirmed), something like 30 , i think..

BBCWatcher 29-06-2018 09:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foozgarden (Post 115213827)
but, DPI only up to 400k.. if you need more than that, u have to go thru agent

No, you can just double up (two policies up to $400K each, for example). And there’s some wisdom in that.

BBCWatcher 29-06-2018 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tangent314 (Post 115211384)
If you don't like the idea of it being Asia-focused, there are global high yield bond funds available on other exchanges.

I don’t because we’ve actually had an (the) Asian Financial Crisis, and not that long ago. I don’t see why Asia is necessarily better than any other planetary region.

Yes, there are global junk bond index funds. You can also steer the other way and get a global sovereign bond index fund. Or some of both.

little pupsky 29-06-2018 10:56 PM

If QL3 is too high risk, there is N6M/QL2 which is lower in risk.

Lucky_Farmer 29-06-2018 11:33 PM

Thanks BBCWatcher

5. Do you keep cash in saving accounts in Singapore and if so which ones you are using at the moment?

6. Which credit cards (issued by banks in Singapore) you are currently holding? I just have to ask this question. You always come up with unknown but brilliant CC. You won't have to mention ICBC Travel and CIMB cards, I know how much you like them.

tangent314 30-06-2018 02:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foozgarden (Post 115213505)
hmm.. not sure if junk bonds are a good idea for a retiree.
something that offers a good night sleep for an old man will be good.

There's a HUGE difference between buying junk bonds and buying junk bonds fund.
If you buy one junk bond and it defaults you are badly screwed, but if you buy a junk bond fund, even if a few of the bonds inside default, you still come out ahead.

If we take for example O9P/QL3 with a weighted average YTM of 7.15%. On a bad year, maybe 3% of the bonds will default, and return only 40% of principle. The yield will then be 97 * 1.0715 + 3 * 0.4 = 5.14%, minus 0.5% fee.

If you look at the past performance of such bond funds, the defaults are all taken into account.

BBCWatcher 30-06-2018 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucky_Farmer (Post 115216199)
5. Do you keep cash in saving accounts in Singapore and if so which ones you are using at the moment?

Sure, but I don’t have anything particularly magical or special to suggest that I haven’t already mentioned.

Quote:

6. Which credit cards (issued by banks in Singapore) you are currently holding? I just have to ask this question. You always come up with unknown but brilliant CC. You won't have to mention ICBC Travel and CIMB cards, I know how much you like them.
UOB’s UnionPay Platinum credit card is mildly interesting for local Singapore dollar spending since it has a simple, flat, no minimum/no maximum 2% rebate. The occasional promotions are decent. But UnionPay acceptance is still spotty, and a lot of cashiers struggle with it. Also, while there’s a 3 year annual fee waiver (pretty generous by Singapore standards), you have to request (and may not get) a waiver after that.

BBCWatcher 30-06-2018 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tangent314 (Post 115217569)
There's a HUGE difference between buying junk bonds and buying junk bonds fund.

Maybe, but I wouldn’t concentrate that risk by picking a regional junk bond fund.

tangent314 30-06-2018 11:06 AM

Fair enough. A global junk bond fund then, e.g.
https://www.ishares.com/uk/individua...bond-ucits-etf

BBCWatcher 01-07-2018 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tangent314 (Post 115220225)
Fair enough. A global junk bond fund then, e.g.
https://www.ishares.com/uk/individua...bond-ucits-etf

Those are somewhat expensive funds, please note: 0.50%/year mangement fees.

foozgarden 01-07-2018 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBCWatcher (Post 115214509)
No, you can just double up (two policies up to $400K each, for example). And there’s some wisdom in that.

http://www.fundsupermart.com/insuran...XspC!761627065

3) Critical Illness (CI)
There are differences in the number of critical illness definitions between DPI and Non-DPI products. DPI products cover 30 CIs, while non-DPI products have the flexibility to cover more than 30 CIs3.

Cancer and Pneumonia are the top 2 causes of death in Singapore4. In a recent AIA's Health Matters Survey conducted this year, it is discovered that more people can only survive (financially) one critical illness incidence.

Non-DPI products can cover a wider range of CI for clients (see "Worried About Critical Illness? Here's 3 Plans You Should Know").

With the comparison above, don’t you think it would be penny wise, pound foolish?

BBCWatcher 01-07-2018 08:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foozgarden (Post 115244497)
With the comparison above, don’t you think it would be penny wise, pound foolish?

No. I believe we’re talking about simple term life insurance here. In the hierarchy of insurance needs, Disability Income Insurance (DII) and hospitalization insurance easily outrank so-called “Critical Illness” policies of any sort. Moreover, even if you want to purchase CI coverage, there’s no particular reason why it ought to be bundled with simple term life insurance, or to be bundled with particular simple term life insurance.

There’s some wisdom in not buying too much insurance from a single carrier due to the government’s limits on policyholder protection in the event your insurance carrier has financial problems.

tangent314 01-07-2018 10:44 PM

Just curious, for a US person, is there a reason not to use robinhood as the trading platform of choice?

BBCWatcher 02-07-2018 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tangent314 (Post 115246873)
Just curious, for a US person, is there a reason not to use robinhood as the trading platform of choice?

Robinhood is pretty good, but it's not officially available to people living outside the United States.

Schwab has commission free and rock bottom low cost index mutual funds that are perfectly lovely for U.S. persons, and they're also generally OK with non-U.S. residents. So I think they're probably the best-of-breed at the moment in that category (and in a few others).

kael1n83 02-07-2018 08:27 PM

BBCW, for non-US citizens, over what length of must one have worked in the US to qualify for social security benefits?


All times are GMT +8. The time now is 08:47 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © SPH Magazines Pte Ltd. All rights reserved.