www.hardwarezone.com.sg


www.hardwarezone.com.sg (/)
-   Money Mind (https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/money-mind-210/)
-   -   *Official* BBCWatcher club (https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/money-mind-210/%2Aofficial%2A-bbcwatcher-club-5855578.html)

mrclubbie 28-09-2019 08:25 AM

Morning to you :)

celtosaxon 28-09-2019 10:50 AM

Ever since it first became available I have been successful in getting my free US annual credit report online from Singapore by going through a US VPN (both my personal one and my company’s).

Each time I have done this, only one of the 3 credit bureaus wouldn’t allow it and asked me to mail in... the other two have worked. Since I now have a Capital One credit card with free credit monitoring (and it’s also a great card for overseas spending), I rarely feel the need to get the free credit report.

I have used the technique you mentioned to set up a joint account with my non-US wife. We limit the balance to avoid gift tax implications. She still had an SSN from her student days and I was able to reestablish credit under her name (2 years later she now has a FICO over 800). This allows us to use a “2 player system” each time we visit the US, got to love those sign-up bonuses!

BBCWatcher 28-09-2019 02:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by celtosaxon (Post 122974600)
We limit the balance to avoid gift tax implications.

I'm not sure I understand this sentence. Could you elaborate?

For 2019, if you're a U.S. citizen and your spouse isn't, the gift limit is US$155,000. That's per year. Limiting the balance on a joint account isn't per se how you'd avoid running afoul of that gift limit. And you're still allowed to give more. Gifts in excess of the limit simply count against the U.S. estate tax exemption, which is US$11.4 million for 2019, also a significant figure. There are also plenty of expenditures that don't count as gifts for U.S. tax purposes, such as medical and educational expenses.

celtosaxon 28-09-2019 05:39 PM

Sure. So beyond this joint account, at the present time I am transfering something close to (currently $155k) limit to my non-US spouse each year, which gets moved to her broker and invested outside of US tax.

That is why I try to limit what goes into our joint account since half of what gets deposited for a given year is counted toward the limit (my understanding). And, I prefer not to use up my lifetime estate tax exemption at this time.

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBCWatcher (Post 122977406)
I'm not sure I understand this sentence. Could you elaborate?

For 2019, if you're a U.S. citizen and your spouse isn't, the gift limit is US$155,000. That's per year. Limiting the balance on a joint account isn't per se how you'd avoid running afoul of that gift limit. And you're still allowed to give more. Gifts in excess of the limit simply count against the U.S. estate tax exemption, which is US$11.4 million for 2019, also a significant figure. There are also plenty of expenditures that don't count as gifts for U.S. tax purposes, such as medical and educational expenses.


marsbarsz 29-09-2019 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBCWatcher (Post 122959205)
If you/your parents failed to renew your NTUC IncomeShield plan, then presumably you're now covered under MediShield Life alone. Any pre-existing conditions you have will be covered up to MediShield Life limits. Thus there's no particular reason to go back to NTUC specifically, and I don't think you should since their Integrated Shield plans aren't competitive at present.

Among public hospital A ward plans I like (in alphabetical order) Great Eastern, Prudential, and Raffles Shield.

Thanks BBCW! But can I check with you what are the most important points you look out for when comparing between IS as I understand that there might be too many? Have done some reading and this article recommends to look out for:
  • Premiums
  • Pre/Post hospitalisation
  • Annual coverage limit

I suppose that are the most important points, unless there are points you think should add/remove? Thanks!

BBCWatcher 29-09-2019 05:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by celtosaxon (Post 122979833)
So beyond this joint account, at the present time I am transfering something close to (currently $155k) limit to my non-US spouse each year, which gets moved to her broker and invested outside of US tax.

OK, and that's a lot. That's also why the limit exists.

Quote:

That is why I try to limit what goes into our joint account since half of what gets deposited for a given year is counted toward the limit (my understanding).
That's the default presumption in the first instance, but where the funds end up is what really counts. Let's pick a couple examples:

1. If you make a payment from the joint account (or from any other account) for your spouse's medically necessary care, in any amount(s), that's not a gift at all. Thus you probably don't want to use the joint account for this and other non-gift payments you can make that benefit your spouse. Why even get near a possible 50% gift interpretation on an expenditure that isn't a gift at all?

2. If your spouse takes 85% of the joint account balance and buys a bunch of securities in her name (or in her grandmother's name for that matter), that's a gift to your spouse, the whole 85%. I don't see how it wouldn't be.

I don't generally like joint accounts, especially between U.S. citizens and "nonresident aliens." I much prefer Payable on Death (PoD) accounts. However, if you have a joint account, I suggest treating it operationally (including for tax reasons) as entirely your spouse's, with two exceptions: (1) you should be safe allocating interest income paid on the account 50-50 between you and your spouse, and (2) if it's non-U.S., you need to report it (FinCEN Form 114 and IRS Form 8938, per their respective thresholds). Stick to one joint account at most, and make the rest PoDs in both directions.

Quote:

Originally Posted by marsbarsz (Post 122985657)
Thanks BBCW! But can I check with you what are the most important points you look out for when comparing between IS as I understand that there might be too many? Have done some reading and this article recommends to look out for:
  • Premiums

No, not really. None of the premiums are guaranteed. You should only pay attention to premiums in order to select the class of Integrated Shield plan (and possibly rider) that you feel comfortable you can pay for on a sustained basis, including medical inflation and age-related premium increases. And there are only three basic classes of Integrated Shield plans:

1. private hospital plans
2. public hospital A ward plans
3. public hospital B1 ward plans

Yes, OK, there are a couple "sub-classes." Raffles Shield offers something called the Raffles Hospital Option that's somewhere in between #1 and #2 on this basic list, and there are Standard Plans available. I don't like the Standard Plans since "as charged" public hospital B1 ward plans are barely more expensive, and they help defend better against medical inflation.

In terms of what's an insurance necessity, only the #3 class (a public hospital B1 ward plan) could count. The government's view is that, for citizens, MediShield Life plus a decent MediSave balance are sufficient to cover baseline, medically necessary care. I disagree with the government a little here, but it's really not reasonable to argue that anything above #3 is a genuine insurance necessity in Singapore. I strongly recommend spending precious premium dollars on any unmet, genuine insurance necessities first, then consider whether you want to spend more premium dollars on a plan above #3. Priorities are important. "Insurance necessities" in the Singapore context generally include:

(a) Term life insurance to age 65, but only if you have at least one genuine dependent. You don't need any life insurance if you don't have dependents.

(b) Disability Income Insurance (DII).

Quote:

  • Pre/Post hospitalisation

Yes, this factor is quite important. Integrated Shield plans are primarily hospitalization insurance plans as opposed to medical insurance plans. Medical care that isn't associated with a hospitalization (or at least a day surgery) isn't covered at all, nor is medical care that's outside the pre-/post-hospitalization coverage window. And this lack of medical coverage is growing problem, for example with expensive prescription drugs that you might need for a long time (or for the rest of your life). So it's rather important to get a longer rather than shorter pre/post-hospitalization coverage window, other things being equal.

Quote:

  • Annual coverage limit

Yes, agreed. Over on the private hospital side AIA is currently best on this score, and for the public hospital plans Great Eastern is the current annual limit winner. A higher annual limit provides a stronger defense against long-term medical inflation, and it's even more important when you have a rider attached. The rider means you burn through the annual limit that much faster.

You, the medical consumer, have a lot of power to manage expenses within whatever reasonable annual limit you have. The single best way you can do that is to get most or all of your care from public medical providers. Another way you can do that, if you stay in a private hospital, is to stay in a multi-bed ward. For example, Raffles Shield A with the Raffles Hospital Option (and rider if you get that) could really burn through the annual limit pretty quickly if you're staying in a single bed Raffles Hospital room. How about staying in a 4 or 6 bed room at Raffles Hospital instead -- or in a single bed room at a public hospital?

Quote:

I suppose that are the most important points, unless there are points you think should add/remove? Thanks!
I also like to look at:

4. "Downgrade" options. Does the carrier offer a decent or better plan in the next lower class? There's no guarantee that particular downgrade plan will be available in the future, but it'd be nice to have an attractive option especially if premiums become unmanageable.

5. If you're a Permanent Resident or foreigner, is there a proration factor applied that spoils the plan? Many, but not all, public hospital plan carriers apply ugly proration factors if you're a PR or foreigner, especially on their B1 plans. Instead they should be charging a slightly higher premium to account for the fact that PRs and foreigners often have to pay higher charges in the public medical system. The carriers shouldn't be whacking PRs and foreigners on the benefit side.

6. Do I have a pre-existing condition that makes it difficult or impossible to do business with a particular carrier? Raffles Shield is currently the only carrier that might cover certain well managed pre-existing conditions, often with higher premiums. However, there are some slight variations across carriers in waiting periods for coverage, such as (unknown, undiagnosed) congenital abnormalities.

7. If there's a rider available, is there a rider variant available that still caps out of pocket expenses for covered services but that still offers a reasonable deductible? A $300 medical bill isn't a calamity, and it really doesn't make sense to me to pay the higher premium for a rider that covers 95% of the medical bill from dollar one. If the carrier offers a rider variant with a reasonable deductible (even $3,000/year seems reasonable to me), then caps out of pocket costs, that's more attractive to me.

8. If you choose a public hospital plan, particularly a public hospital A ward plan, what's the proration factor applied to private hospital care? The higher the proration factor (bigger the percentage number), the more the plan will cover if you choose to "dabble" in the private medical sector.

9. Among the private hospital plans and riders, in particular, what's the carrier's definition of "network" in order to enjoy the best coverage? Is that definition overly restrictive or reasonable? And does it really make sense to pay the higher premiums for the private plan/rider if the network rules are too restrictive (see #8 above)? Would you be better off overall with Raffles Shield A plus the Raffles Hospital Option, or with another public hospital A ward plan with some "dabbling" in the private medical sector?

Bear in mind that private medical provider care will typically be obtained on a reimbursement basis, yet another reason to favor the public medical system.

None of the Integrated Shield plans provide anywhere near adequate coverage for overseas trips. You'll still almost certainly need travel medical insurance for that (with medical evacuation and medical repatriation), and I still like Bupa Global's lowest cost annual plan, priced in British pounds and available for purchase online, assuming you venture outside Singapore at least a couple times per year.

vegavega25 29-09-2019 08:47 AM

I know that you recommend DII as one of the top-three types of insurance to get and critical illness insurance isn't one of these, BUT among CII schemes, do you have any recommendations? And whether to purchase as riders to term life or separately?

BBCWatcher 29-09-2019 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vegavega25 (Post 122986895)
I know that you recommend DII as one of the top-three types of insurance to get and critical illness insurance isn't one of these, BUT among CII schemes, do you have any recommendations?

No, I don't have any specific recommendations.

Quote:

And whether to purchase as riders to term life or separately?
The riders tend to have lower premiums, assuming of course you actually need the term life insurance.

celtosaxon 29-09-2019 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBCWatcher
I much prefer Payable on Death (PoD) accounts.

I was reading this book a few weeks back that said in some cases PoD isn’t effective when it’s a nonresident alien beneficiary (still goes to probate). If I remember correctly it was only in the case of brokerage/securities or IRA/401(k) type of accounts, but I’m not 100% sure.

Agree with your other points. We only have the one joint account and it is mainly for rare situations where she needs to transact in the US. We have never co-mingled our finances in all our years together - not by design, we just never gave it any real consideration. We both work and just sort of agreed on who takes care of which bills.

marsbarsz 30-09-2019 12:12 AM

Thanks for listing out the points! Just looked through the comparison of plans from CPF and have identified some of the main differences based on your points, everything is very close!
  • Pre-hospitalisation: Prudential seems to be the best here with 180 days no exception coverage, followed by GE with 120 days, and Raffles 90/180 but based on approved partners
  • Post-hospitalisation: Prudential leads the rest again with 365 days of no exception coverages, followed by GE with 180/365 coverages with approved partners similar to Raffles
  • Policy Year Limit: GE leads this with coverage of 1m, followed by Pru and Raffles with 600k
  • Downgrade option: GE Leads this with one of the best B1 ward plans, followed by Raffles. Pru doesnt have any B1 option

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBCWatcher (Post 122986384)
7. If there's a rider available, is there a rider variant available that still caps out of pocket expenses for covered services but that still offers a reasonable deductible? A $300 medical bill isn't a calamity, and it really doesn't make sense to me to pay the higher premium for a rider that covers 95% of the medical bill from dollar one. If the carrier offers a rider variant with a reasonable deductible (even $3,000/year seems reasonable to me), then caps out of pocket costs, that's more attractive to me.

Sorry could you elaborate on this point? Not sure what I should be looking out to compare the different riders available

I am inclined on purchasing Prushield due to the longer pre/post hospitalisation coverages but just wanted to check with you if it is worth the following trade offs:
  • Prushield has lower annual coverage limit (600k, compared to GE, 1mil)
  • Prushield only has one rider plan available, and is one of the most expensive


Lastly, on a separate note, just wanted to confirm with you on how important pre-post hospitalisation coverages really are? What if let's say I already have an existing condition with a standard plan that wouldn't be carried forward if I purchase a B1 plan and above.

BBCWatcher 30-09-2019 05:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by celtosaxon (Post 122990934)
I was reading this book a few weeks back that said in some cases PoD isn’t effective when it’s a nonresident alien beneficiary (still goes to probate). If I remember correctly it was only in the case of brokerage/securities or IRA/401(k) type of accounts, but I’m not 100% sure.

IRAs and 401(k)s go to legal spouses, period. They have to explicitly waive their rights to those inherited assets for any other outcome. Is that what you're remembering perhaps?

Quote:

We both work and just sort of agreed on who takes care of which bills.
Oversimplifying, it's generally better if you bear as much burden as you can for ordinary household expenses. It's better if she then focuses on the retirement portion of your joint lifecycles. But don't bend yourselves into pretzels about it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by marsbarsz (Post 122999507)
Thanks for listing out the points! Just looked through the comparison of plans from CPF and have identified some of the main differences based on your points, everything is very close!

Yes, it's both a regulated and competitive market, so the differences are at the margins.

Quote:

  • Pre-hospitalisation: Prudential seems to be the best here with 180 days no exception coverage, followed by GE with 120 days, and Raffles 90/180 but based on approved partners

Both pre- and post- are important, but post- is more important.

Quote:

  • Post-hospitalisation: Prudential leads the rest again with 365 days of no exception coverages, followed by GE with 180/365 coverages with approved partners similar to Raffles
  • Policy Year Limit: GE leads this with coverage of 1m, followed by Pru and Raffles with 600k
  • Downgrade option: GE Leads this with one of the best B1 ward plans, followed by Raffles. Pru doesnt have any B1 option

Prudential does have a downgrade option: their Standard Plan. Yes, that's less attractive than what Great Eastern (especially) and Raffles Shield offer.

For the record, none of these particular downgrade options are appealing to PRs.

Quote:

Sorry could you elaborate on this point? Not sure what I should be looking out to compare the different riders available
It looks like you've reversed the premiums for Great Eastern's riders. Elite costs more than Classic.

There's a reason for that, of course. With Classic you pay the deductible first, then the rider takes over and caps your out of pocket (and often MediSave payable) expenses for covered services at $3,000 per policy year. With Elite the insurance company covers 95% of the deductible, from dollar one, and also caps at $3,000. Having to pay a deductible (often MediSave payable) doesn't strike me as a calamity worth insuring against in this country with compulsory medical savings, so I prefer the more affordable Classic rider here.

Prudential and Raffles Shield don't offer equivalents to GE's TotalCare Classic rider. Raffles Shield's Premier rider is a "luxury" rider (GE also has one), and it's not worth it.

Quote:

I am inclined on purchasing Prushield due to the longer pre/post hospitalisation coverages but just wanted to check with you if it is worth the following trade offs:
  • Prushield has lower annual coverage limit (600k, compared to GE, 1mil)
  • Prushield only has one rider plan available, and is one of the most expensive

All members of my household are on this particular Prudential plan, so obviously I like it. Back when I was shopping for coverage it was the best fit, but that was before Raffles Shield came along and before Great Eastern improved their A Plus plan.

If I were making this decision now I'd probably lean toward Great Eastern due to the higher overall limit, the nice downgrade option (for citizens only), and their more affordable (and still well designed) Classic rider. Yes, there are 60 fewer pre-hospitalization coverage days, but the "pre-" is the less important of the two coverage windows. It's a very close call, though, between all three of these carriers. I don't think you can go wrong with any of them, really.

Quote:

Lastly, on a separate note, just wanted to confirm with you on how important pre-post hospitalisation coverages really are? What if let's say I already have an existing condition with a standard plan that wouldn't be carried forward if I purchase a B1 plan and above.
You mean you have an existing Integrated Shield plan, a Standard Plan? With which carrier?

I'm not actually sure what happens if you were to upgrade your Standard Plan and stay with that carrier. I think the pre-existing condition would be covered up to Standard Plan benefit levels, assuming the pre-existing condition was not pre-existing to when you signed up for their Standard Plan. But you'd have to double check that with the carrier.

Zooming out a little, this is always an interesting question: how much should I be worried about a pre-existing condition "reset"? Should I switch plans in order to improve benefits, or should I worry more about possible pre-existing condition exclusions? That really depends on your personal medical understanding of yourself. The standard applied here is generally a "known or reasonably should have known" standard when it comes to pre-existing conditions. If you feel comfortable with your medical condition based on that standard, then I think it's fine to switch. One caveat, though: there's an additional waiting period for coverage of congenital abnormalities. So, for example, if you've got some undiagnosed heart valve flutter that nobody has ever noticed, but you've had it since birth, and then within the next couple years it starts causing some problems that require medical intervention, that condition wouldn't be covered with a carrier switch. In that case, you'd get yourself referred into public hospital B2 or C ward (or maybe B2+ ward if you can find it), get MediShield Life coverage benefits, and pay the rest with MediSave and/or cash. Not the end of the world, in other words, but you'd just have to be a little more careful as a medical consumer and/or suck up more of the cost.

celtosaxon 30-09-2019 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBCWatcher
... generally better if you bear as much burden

Oh my wife would LOVE that... but then we would have $0 in retirement savings! Ha!

BBCWatcher 30-09-2019 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by celtosaxon (Post 123001157)
Oh my wife would LOVE that... but then we would have $0 in retirement savings! Ha!

I did say I was oversimplifying. ;)

....But in that case, if your spouse likes to spend practically everything and doesn't have much total income at present, she has the choice to make a so-called Section 6013(g) election. That is, she's allowed to file a joint U.S. tax return with you ("Married Filing Jointly"). That'd mean IRS Form 8938 ("FATCA"), PFIC complications (if she has them), but not FinCEN Form 114. It's not a common choice, but sometimes a Section 6013(g) election makes financial sense on a household basis. It's a once per lifetime election, strictly her voluntary choice to make or not make. Once she revokes that election -- once she "tax divorces" you, also her sole prerogative -- the revocation is permanent. The only way back into a joint filing (once revoked) is if she becomes a U.S. resident or U.S. citizen. One interesting, quirky little feature of a Section 6013(g) election is that the nonresident alien spouse becomes eligible for IRA contributions as long as the couple (jointly, collectively) has enough unexcluded earned income and otherwise qualifies. Convincing an IRA custodian that that's what the tax code allows and to accept a nonresident alien as a customer are separate issues, but it's legally possible according to the research I've done.

Which reminds me to mention (alternatively) that you could both take a look at joint/survivor or joint/contingent life annuities where she is the primary beneficiary (and outside the U.S. tax system) while you're the designated survivor. Funded with some of that US$155K/year of gift giving that you do. That annuity will only ever be subject to U.S. tax (with a rather complicated tax calculation probably), and then only from that point forward, if she predeceases you. Maybe that'd all make some sense for retirement savings purposes.

....She can also buy a house that you live in together. If she's the sole, titular owner of the house and outside the U.S. tax system, there's no U.S. capital gains tax if the home valuation (net of allowable costs) soars by >US$500,000 (the exclusion for a couple on a primary residence). Could you even pay her fair market value rent and take the rent as a Foreign Housing Exclusion? No, I seriously doubt it, but wouldn't that be fun if that were allowed.

marsbarsz 30-09-2019 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BBCWatcher (Post 123000444)
It looks like you've reversed the premiums for Great Eastern's riders. Elite costs more than Classic.

Oops yes, thanks for correcting me!


Quote:

All members of my household are on this particular Prudential plan, so obviously I like it. Back when I was shopping for coverage it was the best fit, but that was before Raffles Shield came along and before Great Eastern improved their A Plus plan.
It seems that the plans are constantly changing, do you change your plan often (assuming you don't have any pre-existing conditions to be carried over)? And does this also mean that we need to be regularly checking the insurance market and change to a new carrier since plans are changing so much.

Quote:

Yes, there are 60 fewer pre-hospitalization coverage days, but the "pre-" is the less important of the two coverage windows. It's a very close call, though, between all three of these carriers. I don't think you can go wrong with any of them, really.
I forgot to check with you on one note. GE and Raffles shield do cover close to Pru's post-hospitalisation of 365 days, however only [for Panel specialist in a Private Hospital (with certificate of preauthorisation) or Restructured Hospital] So does this mean that if I want 365 days in GE, I need to go to a private hospital? Is this exception something big I should take consideration about?


Quote:

You mean you have an existing Integrated Shield plan, a Standard Plan? With which carrier?

I'm not actually sure what happens if you were to upgrade your Standard Plan and stay with that carrier. I think the pre-existing condition would be covered up to Standard Plan benefit levels, assuming the pre-existing condition was not pre-existing to when you signed up for their Standard Plan. But you'd have to double check that with the carrier.
To be honest, just checking on my parents behalf since i'm on this topic. True, I guess most importantly is to
- Check if the pre existing condition is life-threatening one
- Check if the pre-existing condition will still be covered under the standard plan if i switch to the B1 plan

But at the end of the day, will having some pre/post-hospitalisation treatment coverage be more important than the fact that they might not be covered for 1 pre-existing condition?

BBCWatcher 30-09-2019 09:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by marsbarsz (Post 123001539)
It seems that the plans are constantly changing, do you change your plan often (assuming you don't have any pre-existing conditions to be carried over)?

No. It doesn't make sense to go through a pre-existing condition reset (and new congenital abnormalities waiting period) for a minor improvement in coverage and/or a slightly lower premium, both of which can be fleeting. Premiums are not guaranteed, and the carriers can occasionally improve their plans a bit. For example, NTUC recently increased their pre-/post-hospitalization coverage window from 90/90 to at least 100/100 days.

Quote:

I forgot to check with you on one note. GE and Raffles shield do cover close to Pru's post-hospitalisation of 365, however only [for Panel specialist in a Private Hospital (with certificate of preauthorisation) or Restructured Hospital] So does this mean that if I want 365 days in GE, I need to go to a private hospital? Is this exception something big I should take consideration about?
No, it's the opposite. Restructured hospitals are the public hospitals, so you're covered for the full 365 days that way. You're looking at public hospital A ward plans here, so any/all private hospital care you seek will be prorated anyway. That is, you'll be responsible for 30 to 40 percent of that cost, depending on the proration factor the particular public hospital A ward plan applies to private hospital care. So I don't think this distinction really matters too much since you aren't going to be frequenting private hospitals all that often when you have a public hospital plan.

Quote:

To be honest, just checking on my parents behalf since i'm on this topic. True, I guess most importantly is to
- Check if the pre existing condition is life-threatening one
- Check if the pre-existing condition will still be covered under the standard plan if i switch to the B1 plan
For anyone who has a pre-existing condition I'd most likely stand pat. Yes, OK, you could explore whether the slight upgrade from a Standard Plan to the same carrier's "as charged" B1 plan will maintain Standard Plan coverage for pre-existing conditions. If it does, and if the carrier will accept the upgrade application, that'd likely be a good switch to make. Medical decisions really aren't going to be any different. You're still going to choose public hospital B1 ward (or B2+ ward) stays regardless. So that all works, assuming again the carrier won't knock you all the way down to MediShield Life coverage levels for pre-existing conditions. You might even decide to bump up to that carrier's public hospital A ward plan, then stay in B1 ward if you have any doubts about whether coverage will be at Standard Plan or the new A ward plan levels, if the A ward plan has something compelling enough to justify the higher premium, such as a significantly higher annual limit. Jumping all the way up to a private hospital plan would be a bridge too far, though. You'd be too petrified of not being covered for pre-existing conditions (except to Standard Plan levels), so you'd probably never stay in a private hospital.

Make sense?


All times are GMT +8. The time now is 03:50 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © SPH Magazines Pte Ltd. All rights reserved.