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Old 11-09-2019, 04:31 PM   #46
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It's actually 6k x 17 months a year - 12 months OW and 5 months AW.
However you put it, the max is 37,740.

You can be paid OW and AW every month or no OW but AW only and the max is still 37,740.
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Old 11-09-2019, 04:49 PM   #47
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I have to disagree with this one. If those who can hit cpf ceiling and yet can't hit FRS with normal salary contribution, it goes so much to say cpf has set an unrealistic amount for FRS. If the top earners can't hit FRS, those earning much lesser will have all their money stuck at age of 55. This is a political suicide.

It's actually 6k x 17 months a year - 12 months OW and 5 months AW.

I don't think govt's intention is to let you hit FRS purely on salary contributions. They want you to do OA-SA transfers or SA topups. It also took many years before the ceiling was revised. 5k in 2004, then back to 6k 11 years later. It could take another 10 years to increase to 7k.
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Old 11-09-2019, 04:53 PM   #48
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I have to disagree with this one. If those who can hit cpf ceiling and yet can't hit FRS with normal salary contribution, it goes so much to say cpf has set an unrealistic amount for FRS. If the top earners can't hit FRS, those earning much lesser will have all their money stuck at age of 55. This is a political suicide.
U are sharp! Another rubbish comment from him!

It's actually 6k x 17 months a year - 12 months OW and 5 months AW.

I don't think govt's intention is to let you hit FRS purely on salary contributions. They want you to do OA-SA transfers or SA topups. It also took many years before the ceiling was revised. 5k in 2004, then back to 6k 11 years later. It could take another 10 years to increase to 7k.
This (in red) is also rubbish to support his first statement!
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Old 11-09-2019, 05:28 PM   #49
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I think they can get back every cent of their money if they renounce citizenship and move out of Singapore and West Malaysia and become problem of some other country.

I guess Singaporean should be happy if this happens. Very likely these people will be problems if they remain in SG.
You are not thinking

Can take out every cent Ö if migrate. You think the have notes can easily migrate? Who wants them?

The government is indeed giving money to the lesser mortals in quite a few ways and some are getting money for not even working

I know lady getting $350 per month besides other handouts and subsidies. She also renting out her one and only room and sleeps on the floor. She even goes round the market to beg, if not steal

She enjoys herself by staking her money on 3 cards.
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Old 11-09-2019, 07:10 PM   #50
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You are not thinking

Can take out every cent Ö if migrate. You think the have notes can easily migrate? Who wants them?

The government is indeed giving money to the lesser mortals in quite a few ways and some are getting money for not even working

I know lady getting $350 per month besides other handouts and subsidies. She also renting out her one and only room and sleeps on the floor. She even goes round the market to beg, if not steal

She enjoys herself by staking her money on 3 cards.
Thatís precisely why CPF life is required so that they become a smaller problem for the rest...
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Old 11-09-2019, 07:18 PM   #51
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That's the problem, people can't hit FRS yet expect to get a big payout similar to others who worked harder to hit FRS.
It's not reasonable to assume that a person earning a higher income "worked harder" for the greater income. It's just a higher level of compensation, that's all. There are millions (billions?) of extremely hardworking individuals earning little or no income, working much harder than most of us do.

Labor markets can be quite "strange." A minor celebrity that merely makes an appearance at a club and enjoys a couple drinks there can be richly compensated compared to the club's obviously much harder working bartender and janitor. This phenomenon isn't at all unusual.
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Old 11-09-2019, 09:49 PM   #52
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Thatís precisely why CPF life is required so that they become a smaller problem for the rest...
You still not thinking? You are deviating from what you said in post #39 which I commented Ö. Nothing to do with CPF Life.
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Old 11-09-2019, 10:28 PM   #53
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You still not thinking? You are deviating from what you said in post #39 which I commented Ö. Nothing to do with CPF Life.
Either they leave, problem solved. Or they stay but they have compulsory saving to lessen the trouble to the society, which is CPF life.

Free loaders are going to be free loaders. You wonít change that.


I donít see whatís the problem here.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:19 PM   #54
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I have to disagree with this one. If those who can hit cpf ceiling and yet can't hit FRS with normal salary contribution, it goes so much to say cpf has set an unrealistic amount for FRS. If the top earners can't hit FRS, those earning much lesser will have all their money stuck at age of 55. This is a political suicide.
Oops, you're actually right. Checked my CPF calculator and I'll clear the FRS amount easily by the time I'm 55. Gonna leave this thread now
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Old 12-09-2019, 02:12 AM   #55
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Whenever the topic of CPF comes up, there will always be heated discussions.

I personally think CPF is a useful tool but, not the only tool to rely on for one’s retirement in Singapore. 4%+ p.a. risk free rate compounding. I can’t find a similar bond (AAA rated) that pays that yield. Definitely good to have some of this in my portfolio.

Returning to the topic, I belong to the camp who believes that most can hit their FRS if:
(1) they stay actively employed and strive to build their career;
(2) they don’t over-consume in buying their property;
(3) they actively plan to hit it and YOLO less.

Yes, there will always be exceptions. Some will have to stop working prematurely because of health reasons. And there will always be people who drop out of employment at their own volition like my wife. Uni grad, not interested to work and dropped out of the employment world in her 30s.

I am just an employee. Have been working more or less consistently since I graduated, focused on progressing as much as I can in my career. I have already exceeded the $181k in my SA for the FRS (I know it is a moving target, depending on one’s age group) but I get 4% compounded annually on my current SA balance. The increase in the last few years for FRS has been ~$5k per annum and if it stays around that level, by the time I hit 55, my FRS will be taken care of solely by the compound interest even if I stop working today, which I don’t intend to. I would like my SA to hit the ERS when I retire.

As for my wife who has stopped working since her 30s, luckily for her she has a husband who plans for her and will ensure that she will at least hit her FRS through regular top-ups when she turns 55. So far, her SA is on track.

That’s 2 persons who will hit their FRS. We are just 2 normal Singaporeans making our way in Singapore. Not looking to the government for any handouts, not intending to game the system for any freebies but merely exercising self responsibility and self reliance.

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Old 12-09-2019, 07:52 AM   #56
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Whizzard: good work.
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Old 12-09-2019, 08:49 AM   #57
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Whenever the topic of CPF comes up, there will always be heated discussions.

I personally think CPF is a useful tool but, not the only tool to rely on for oneís retirement in Singapore. 4%+ p.a. risk free rate compounding. I canít find a similar bond (AAA rated) that pays that yield. Definitely good to have some of this in my portfolio.

Returning to the topic, I belong to the camp who believes that most can hit their FRS if:
(1) they stay actively employed and strive to build their career;
(2) they donít over-consume in buying their property;
(3) they actively plan to hit it and YOLO less.

Yes, there will always be exceptions. Some will have to stop working prematurely because of health reasons. And there will always be people who drop out of employment at their own volition like my wife. Uni grad, not interested to work and dropped out of the employment world in her 30s.

I am just an employee. Have been working more or less consistently since I graduated, focused on progressing as much as I can in my career. I have already exceeded the $181k in my SA for the FRS (I know it is a moving target, depending on oneís age group) but I get 4% compounded annually on my current SA balance. The increase in the last few years for FRS has been ~$5k per annum and if it stays around that level, by the time I hit 55, my FRS will be taken care of solely by the compound interest even if I stop working today, which I donít intend to. I would like my SA to hit the ERS when I retire.

As for my wife who has stopped working since her 30s, luckily for her she has a husband who plans for her and will ensure that she will at least hit her FRS through regular top-ups when she turns 55. So far, her SA is on track.

Thatís 2 persons who will hit their FRS. We are just 2 normal Singaporeans making our way in Singapore. Not looking to the government for any handouts, not intending to game the system for any freebies but merely exercising self responsibility and self reliance.


Awesome achievement! U are in your late 40s?
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Old 12-09-2019, 09:13 AM   #58
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Whenever the topic of CPF comes up, there will always be heated discussions.

I personally think CPF is a useful tool but, not the only tool to rely on for oneís retirement in Singapore. 4%+ p.a. risk free rate compounding. I canít find a similar bond (AAA rated) that pays that yield. Definitely good to have some of this in my portfolio.

Returning to the topic, I belong to the camp who believes that most can hit their FRS if:
(1) they stay actively employed and strive to build their career;
(2) they donít over-consume in buying their property;
(3) they actively plan to hit it and YOLO less.

Yes, there will always be exceptions. Some will have to stop working prematurely because of health reasons. And there will always be people who drop out of employment at their own volition like my wife. Uni grad, not interested to work and dropped out of the employment world in her 30s.

I am just an employee. Have been working more or less consistently since I graduated, focused on progressing as much as I can in my career. I have already exceeded the $181k in my SA for the FRS (I know it is a moving target, depending on oneís age group) but I get 4% compounded annually on my current SA balance. The increase in the last few years for FRS has been ~$5k per annum and if it stays around that level, by the time I hit 55, my FRS will be taken care of solely by the compound interest even if I stop working today, which I donít intend to. I would like my SA to hit the ERS when I retire.

As for my wife who has stopped working since her 30s, luckily for her she has a husband who plans for her and will ensure that she will at least hit her FRS through regular top-ups when she turns 55. So far, her SA is on track.

Thatís 2 persons who will hit their FRS. We are just 2 normal Singaporeans making our way in Singapore. Not looking to the government for any handouts, not intending to game the system for any freebies but merely exercising self responsibility and self reliance.


If your wife has not hit FRS, transfer your OA to her SA for better yield if you have no intention to draw your OA. At least some of your OA should move to her SA as you continue to work and build your OA and SA.
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Old 12-09-2019, 09:34 AM   #59
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If your wife has not hit FRS, transfer your OA to her SA for better yield if you have no intention to draw your OA. At least some of your OA should move to her SA as you continue to work and build your OA and SA.
You thinking or not?

Fail to read the numbers and telling him to do dumb thing
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Old 12-09-2019, 10:03 AM   #60
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does it mean if once SA hits current FRS, no more cash topup is allowed? only topup from work contributions will go into the SA? Or does the work contribution go to OA after hitting current FRS?

anyone did the sums if it better to hit FRS first or leave a gap for topup (for tax relief for those who are working)?

situation for 40, 50 and 60 years as of today

thanks in advance!
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