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Should singapore government follow india government to put a cap on private hospital charges?

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Old 09-07-2018, 09:37 PM   #1
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Should singapore government follow india government to put a cap on private hospital charges?

https://www.google.com.sg/amp/s/m.ti...w/63754561.cms

Earlier this year, India passed a bill to cap private hospital charge to tackle overcharging problem by private hospitals.

Given the escalating medical cost and medical insurance premium in Singapore, I think singapore government should do the same.
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Old 09-07-2018, 09:53 PM   #2
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Some better solutions are to raise professionalism of the doctors, increase price transparencies and co-payments of medical bills.

India is probably lacking the first 2.
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Old 10-07-2018, 09:18 AM   #3
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Private hospital here is for rich foreigner. Not rich pls go public one.
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Old 10-07-2018, 09:54 AM   #4
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Nope. Private hospital should have the rights to set their own prices, as long as there is transparency to the patients.

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Old 10-07-2018, 10:42 AM   #5
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It will affect your medical insurance premium?

Nope. Private hospital should have the rights to set their own prices, as long as there is transparency to the patients.

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Old 10-07-2018, 11:57 AM   #6
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What's surely going to happen over time -- it's already happening, actually -- is that the insurance carriers will adopt various "carrots" and "sticks" to try to moderate medical provider pricing and thus insurance premiums. Here are some examples:

* Various vitality and wellness programs, to encourage policyholders to adopt more healthy lifestyles and habits that help reduce future medical bills. AIA is already doing this in Singapore.

* Having "in network" and "out of network" categories for medical providers. "In network" providers will have pre-negotiated, more favorable pricing. Again, AIA is already doing this.

* Reducing or eliminating coverage for single bedded private hospital wards while still covering care in multi-bed private hospital wards.

* Requiring pre-approval for admission into a private hospital, perhaps based on inability to get an appointment within a certain period of time at a public hospital. I've seen people complain about this perceived availability problem so, OK, a clever insurer could write a policy that addresses this concern. That is, you must seek care at a public hospital first if you want to be covered, but "call us up and we'll arrange for you to go to a private hospital (lowest level ward, "in network") if for some (strange) reason we cannot find a bed for you at a public hospital." Which will basically never happen, so the cost for an insurer to add this feature to its public hospital plan will be essentially zero.
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Old 10-07-2018, 02:00 PM   #7
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Like that propose just buy public hospital.
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Old 10-07-2018, 02:31 PM   #8
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My medical insurance is due for renewal next month, still considering if I should opt for a downgrade.
My agent told me existing conditions will
Still be covered.

What's surely going to happen over time -- it's already happening, actually -- is that the insurance carriers will adopt various "carrots" and "sticks" to try to moderate medical provider pricing and thus insurance premiums. Here are some examples:

* Various vitality and wellness programs, to encourage policyholders to adopt more healthy lifestyles and habits that help reduce future medical bills. AIA is already doing this in Singapore.

* Having "in network" and "out of network" categories for medical providers. "In network" providers will have pre-negotiated, more favorable pricing. Again, AIA is already doing this.

* Reducing or eliminating coverage for single bedded private hospital wards while still covering care in multi-bed private hospital wards.

* Requiring pre-approval for admission into a private hospital, perhaps based on inability to get an appointment within a certain period of time at a public hospital. I've seen people complain about this perceived availability problem so, OK, a clever insurer could write a policy that addresses this concern. That is, you must seek care at a public hospital first if you want to be covered, but "call us up and we'll arrange for you to go to a private hospital (lowest level ward, "in network") if for some (strange) reason we cannot find a bed for you at a public hospital." Which will basically never happen, so the cost for an insurer to add this feature to its public hospital plan will be essentially zero.
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Old 10-07-2018, 02:50 PM   #9
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The Ministry of Health publishes some waiting time statistics, I've found. Here, for example, are the daily (!) waiting time statistics for public hospital ward admissions:

https://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_w...n_to_Ward.html

These statistics are based on the time between when a doctor makes a decision to admit a patient and the patient's admission into a hospital bed. The median experience (50th percentile) is reported. Khoo Teck Puat Hospital is the best performing public hospital on this measure, as I write this. Tan Tock Seng Hospital requires the longest waits. What can we conclude from these statistics? Geography matters, quite simply. If you want the fastest service then you probably ought to head to one of the hospitals in Singapore's outer regions rather than a centrally located one.

What about bed choices? MOH provides some clues in these bed occupancy rate (BOR) statistics:

https://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_w..._Rate_BOR.html

Head over to Changi General Hospital (CGH), it looks like, particularly if you're trying to get into a subsidized ward (C or B2).

How about the polyclinics? Waiting times for registration and consultation are reported here:

https://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_w...lyclinics.html

They're all broadly similar and pretty good. (I'm a bit surprised, actually.) I've had much longer waits at private medical providers than even those 95th percentile numbers reported for May, 2018. To get your polyclinic waiting time down simply make an appointment ahead of time if you can, pick a typically slower day and time, register at the kiosk when you arrive instead of at the counter, watch carefully for your number to be called (if you miss it, you'll certainly wait longer), and you should breeze right through.

I'd like to see more statistics reported, including appointment waits to see specialists, for particular diagnostic tests (e.g. MRIs), and for A&E attendance. And for private hospitals and medical providers, too. There's something of a mythology that nobody ever waits for anything in a private hospital, but that's just not true.
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Old 10-07-2018, 02:56 PM   #10
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My medical insurance is due for renewal next month, still considering if I should opt for a downgrade. My agent told me existing conditions will
Still be covered.
What's the premium difference, inclusive of the corresponding rider adjustment? (And would you keep the same class of rider or adjust to a "Lite"/"Saver"/"Assist" sort of rider?)

Different individuals in a household might make different coverage decisions. Tastes, preferences, and needs can vary. As a notable example, women and children enjoy dedicated public medical providers (KK Hospital in particular) that men do not, so there's a reasonable argument that their insurance coverage needs are somewhat different. Or, to pick another example, you might want a child to have public hospital A ward coverage simply because you'd want to stay with your child all day and night (which is generally permitted in a single bedded ward), and you're willing to pay the tiny markup for that higher coverage level versus, say, a public hospital B1 ward plan.
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Old 10-07-2018, 03:10 PM   #11
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https://www.google.com.sg/amp/s/m.ti...w/63754561.cms

Earlier this year, India passed a bill to cap private hospital charge to tackle overcharging problem by private hospitals.

Given the escalating medical cost and medical insurance premium in Singapore, I think singapore government should do the same.
I don't like the idea. People who are unlucky to be so sick that their hospital bill exceeds the maximum cap will be left hanging there to die. Doctors are humans and are driven by money, ultimately. No money, no talk. No money, you die your business. In this case, even if patients have money, govt says no money for doctor. So, you die your business. I am confident our government will not make this kind of market intervention unless they have some badly designed KPI to hit like car-lite goal. Lots of unintended consequences.

Last edited by klarklar; 10-07-2018 at 03:13 PM..
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Old 10-07-2018, 03:59 PM   #12
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My medical insurance is due for renewal next month, still considering if I should opt for a downgrade.
My agent told me existing conditions will
Still be covered.
Once you downgrade, it'll be difficult to upgrade in the future. They will question why you need more coverage, whether you discover new illness that require higher coverage. Probably require you to go for checkups before approval, or worse, deny claims and return you the premium.
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Old 10-07-2018, 04:03 PM   #13
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Actually I think I can comfortably afford government ward A plan with full rider, but I am
Worried about the escalating private hospital
Premium when I get older.
Basically I am looking at the difference between prudhield a premier versus prushield a plus. Intend to do a switch.

What's the premium difference, inclusive of the corresponding rider adjustment? (And would you keep the same class of rider or adjust to a "Lite"/"Saver"/"Assist" sort of rider?)

Different individuals in a household might make different coverage decisions. Tastes, preferences, and needs can vary. As a notable example, women and children enjoy dedicated public medical providers (KK Hospital in particular) that men do not, so there's a reasonable argument that their insurance coverage needs are somewhat different. Or, to pick another example, you might want a child to have public hospital A ward coverage simply because you'd want to stay with your child all day and night (which is generally permitted in a single bedded ward), and you're willing to pay the tiny markup for that higher coverage level versus, say, a public hospital B1 ward plan.
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Old 10-07-2018, 04:05 PM   #14
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Actually my downgrade is from private hospital full coverage to public hospital full coverage... you are right about the upgrade part, but once I downgrade, I won’t upgrade again. Coz my first operation also done in a public hospital.

Once you downgrade, it'll be difficult to upgrade in the future. They will question why you need more coverage, whether you discover new illness that require higher coverage. Probably require you to go for checkups before approval, or worse, deny claims and return you the premium.
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Old 10-07-2018, 04:12 PM   #15
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Actually my downgrade is from private hospital full coverage to public hospital full coverage... you are right about the upgrade part, but once I downgrade, I won’t upgrade again. Coz my first operation also done in a public hospital.
u risk losing full coverage/rider, new gahmen policy remember, check
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