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Tax suggestion: impose capital gains tax on HDB gains when PR sells HDB

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Old 14-02-2018, 11:27 PM   #76
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There are some citizenships available for outright purchase, mostly island nations such as St. Kitts and Nevis, Dominica, Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Lucia, Cyprus, and Grenada. No residence required (except for Antigua and Barbuda which requires 5 days). Malta requires 6 months of residence within a 1 year period. Bulgaria is pretty rapid, too. Austrian citizenship is in principle purchasable, albeit discretely and at a very high price.

Among countries that allow naturalization after a short period of legal residence, there's Macedonia (1 year), the Dominican Republic (2 years), Paraguay (3 years), Uruguay (3 years if you're in a family living together there/broadly defined, 5 years if single), and Russia (3 years).

There are also some citizenships available via marriage no matter where the couple lives. Marry an Italian, for example (same or opposite sex) and you can acquire Italian citizenship about 5 years after your wedding (the waiting period is a maximum of 3 years, and the applications are processed in about 2). There are also some citizenships available as privileges with particular job postings. As one example, if you serve as a professor at an Austrian university (and don't already have an EU citizenship), you can acquire Austrian citizenship upon request.

Then there are special moments in history when you can join a military force and become an instant or near instant citizen of that country. U.S. citizenship was instantly available to any/every able bodied recruit who volunteered during World War I. The French Foreign Legion is still open for business even today, still accepting recruits, although French citizenship isn't instantly granted upon admission.

So there you go, as just some of the options. Have fun.
All of your options is either crazy or impossible for common HDB owners. And nothing to do with Singaporean or not.
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Old 14-02-2018, 11:29 PM   #77
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All of your options is either crazy or impossible for common HDB owners.
You think marrying an Italian is crazy?

Here are some more (non-crazy) marriage examples:

* Brazil (or have a child out of wedlock with a Brazilian!), plus 1 year of residence
* Spain, plus 1 year of residence
* Portugal, no residence required, but there are language and other requirements
* Ireland, plus 1 year of residence
* Switzerland, some visits there required over a 6 year period
* Belize, plus 1 year of residence
* Serbia, plus brief residence
* Cape Verde, immediate upon application
* Brunei, immediate for wives only
* Iran, immediate for wives only

Some of these countries allow both same and opposite sex couples, such as Ireland.

Last edited by BBCWatcher; 14-02-2018 at 11:42 PM..
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Old 14-02-2018, 11:33 PM   #78
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And what do you propose to solve that problem? Should Mediacorp start a new, free-to-air, adult film channel?

Many, many countries have low birth rates and are trying to increase baby production. I'm not aware of any countries that have enjoyed much success in their efforts. (Some, at the margins, but it's extremely expensive. Importing babies, as well educated young adults with children, is hugely less expensive.)
We need to try out unorthodox policies to make this work.

We have elite politicians earning big salaries so I believe 1 day we can solve this declining birth rate problem among developed countries.

My proposal is along the line of making retirees settle down in Singapore. Instead of them bringing their wealth elsewhere. Also to increase taxes while giving lifetime tax rebates to adults with children living in Singapore.
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Last edited by MikeDirnt78; 14-02-2018 at 11:42 PM..
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Old 14-02-2018, 11:36 PM   #79
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This kind is like CPF. Govt if do that very hard to ask back for it thereafter. If the PR sell and used up all the $$, what can u do if they decide to go back for good to their country haha
Just lock it in their CPF. If they leave after 55, it's no loss really. If they leave earlier, just retrieve it from there.
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Old 14-02-2018, 11:56 PM   #80
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My proposal is along the line of making retirees settle down in Singapore. Instead of them bringing their wealth elsewhere.
"Making"? Nobody over the age of 60 is allowed to exit Singapore?

I still have no idea why the government ought to enact policies even to encourage retirees to stay in Singapore. Surely one reason Singaporeans aren't having too many babies is the cost of housing. If more retirees stay in Singapore, housing costs are going to be that much higher.

Also to increase taxes while giving lifetime tax rebates to adults with children living in Singapore.
Yes, that's possible. It's also ridiculously expensive, and it's incredibly unfair (at best) to individuals who are not physically able to bear children. A fairer approach, though still expensive, is basically to do what France and some of the Nordic countries do: provide tons of childcare services, child financial support, and family friendly labor market laws. On the order of adding another zero to current government programs -- it'd be that expensive. Really, really expensive.

I have one idea that's rather inexpensive. In my view the government could be doing more to support and encourage both international and local adoptions. Adoption rates are quite low in Singapore compared to many other developed countries.

How about a National Service waiver if you pledge to father a child before your 23rd birthday -- and 3 years of National Service if you don't? (Yes, I'm joking.)
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Old 15-02-2018, 12:00 AM   #81
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You think marrying an Italian is crazy?

Here are some more (non-crazy) marriage examples:

* Brazil (or have a child out of wedlock with a Brazilian!), plus 1 year of residence
* Spain, plus 1 year of residence
* Portugal, no residence required, but there are language and other requirements
* Ireland, plus 1 year of residence
* Switzerland, some visits there required over a 6 year period
* Belize, plus 1 year of residence
* Serbia, plus brief residence
* Cape Verde, immediate upon application
* Brunei, immediate for wives only
* Iran, immediate for wives only

Some of these countries allow both same and opposite sex couples, such as Ireland.
Eh. U Live in Siingapore or not? Normally have to ROM first to buy BTO. U suggest people to get divorce to get some fake marriage?
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Old 15-02-2018, 12:05 AM   #82
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In for proposals
Keep proposing and still nothing will be done

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Old 15-02-2018, 12:07 AM   #83
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The scenario described upthread is "escaping Singapore," with considerable CPF assets. That'd be older Singaporeans doing that, not younger, by and large.

I'm not suggesting anything except that Singaporeans (and others) are perfectly free to acquire other citizenships if they wish, and there are many, many ways they can do that. I'm also answering the question asked.
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Old 15-02-2018, 12:12 AM   #84
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Why is birth rate so important? Soon, producing robots will be cheaper than giving birth a baby.

Lack of labor? No problem, just press the button and robots will come off the line.

If really necessary, cloning will not be a problem. Babies born out of lab not a problem, either. Just need some genetic information.
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Old 15-02-2018, 12:34 AM   #85
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The scenario described upthread is "escaping Singapore," with considerable CPF assets. That'd be older Singaporeans doing that, not younger, by and large.

I'm not suggesting anything except that Singaporeans (and others) are perfectly free to acquire other citizenships if they wish, and there are many, many ways they can do that. I'm also answering the question asked.
Dont u think all that many ways are ridicules?
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Old 15-02-2018, 08:05 AM   #86
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Don’t u think all that many ways are ridicules?
No, not at all. Every year there are Singaporeans who terminate their citizenships. In fact, many of them are born with multiple citizenships, and the government requires them to choose. Those Singaporeans born as Singaporeans now have some CPF assets, typically — the government’s Medisave top ups, if nothing else.

You asked the question, and I answered it. In the real world, this stuff happens. Singapore’s citizenship law (that doesn’t tolerate multiple citizenships) means it happens rather often. Also, Singaporeans keep marrying foreigners at progressively higher rates. Singaporeans looking for same sex partners (a growing cohort) are particularly highly motivated to marry foreigners because they’re not allowed to marry in Singapore, and they have more rights elsewhere — including adoption rights, for example. Singapore is modern, affluent, and cosmopolitan now. It’s not like it was when our grandparents were born.

Singaporeans terminating (and forced to lose) their citizenships is a growing demographic problem, assuming Singapore wants to maintain its citizen population. South Korea has the same demographic crisis developing and recently changed its citizenship law which previously was hostile to multiple citizenships. Another realistic option would be limited birthright citizenship in Singapore. That is, children born in Singapore (or raised in Singapore from a young age) might be allowed to become Singaporean in expedited fashion at age 18 or 20. If they’ve spent the vast bulk of their childhoods in Singapore, why not? Many countries have this sort of provision in their citizenship laws. The U.S. is debating this very question right now, to decide what to do with the hundreds of thousands of “DREAMers” who were born outside the United States but who were brought to the United States as young children — and who in many cases barely have any awareness of their “home” countries. They are, in every meaningful sense, Americans — but very surprised to learn they aren’t citizens.

Anyway, in my view the government ought to take a fresh look at these questions, about how to reduce citizen attrition. For every Singaporean citizen (and Singaporean “DREAMer,” and stateless child, and same sex spouse) the government keeps and brings into the citizen fold, that’s one fewer citizen they have to “manufacture” in some other way. And such policies would be pro-Singaporean culture, too.

Last edited by BBCWatcher; 15-02-2018 at 08:09 AM..
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