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-   -   Which MBA? (https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/post-degree-programs-courses-215/mba-1852354.html)

delay 23-02-2009 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YWStealth (Post 35956068)
I mean, 'll having a lesser known MBA not be paid the same / considered for same job as a higher end MBA?

:)

depends on whether your MBA is valued or not
:)
but yes there are certain companies that i know of who will not consider lesser regarded MBAs for their strategy jobs. But these are your regular MBA recruiters who knows the value / ranking etc of your mba

YWStealth 24-02-2009 04:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by delay (Post 35965459)
depends on whether your MBA is valued or not
:)
but yes there are certain companies that i know of who will not consider lesser regarded MBAs for their strategy jobs. But these are your regular MBA recruiters who knows the value / ranking etc of your mba

Ooo okay... siong... any DL MBAs tt die die must avoid? Let's say, relatively the most unheard one is Hull and University Canada West offered by Kaplan..

Quote:

Originally Posted by vesfreq (Post 35962650)
Ehh.... cannot have dba meh? Prof wannabe or not, its a matter of personal aspirations. If dba is prof wannabe, then mba must be ceo/ md wannabe? :s13:

Haha. Your joke quite humorous. Gave me quite a good laugh. :) I just wna know for what personal aspirations why ppl take DBA. Around 40k plus right?

Dr_ARCHer 24-02-2009 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YWStealth (Post 35982452)
Haha. Your joke quite humorous. Gave me quite a good laugh. :) I just wna know for what personal aspirations why ppl take DBA. Around 40k plus right?

Same aspiration as those going for PhD :). Anyway, some universities award only DBA and not PhD. Typically, PhD is research while DBA is coursework. So I guess the aspiration is similar to why people do Masters by coursework rather than Masters by research.

vesfreq 24-02-2009 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YWStealth (Post 35982452)
Ooo okay... siong... any DL MBAs tt die die must avoid? Let's say, relatively the most unheard one is Hull and University Canada West offered by Kaplan..



Haha. Your joke quite humorous. Gave me quite a good laugh. :) I just wna know for what personal aspirations why ppl take DBA. Around 40k plus right?

Hull not v unheard of. There are some prominent grads, like one of the senior docs at Raffles Hospital. It was one of my consideration. But, after I thought again, Strath is another 13k more and then the alumni is stronger. Then, there is manchester.... plus another 10k up the ladder n ranking.

Also, hull not new in mkt. Previously, they were under apmi, but kaplan bought over apmi. Its quite value for money too, except that it doesn't ve triple accreditation like strath n mbs which easily catch attention.

jimmypage33 25-02-2009 11:06 PM

Haha, tough times indeed choosing an MBA:) I'd say do the required reserch, but go with your instincts. You will generally listen to very conflicting views when choosing an mba, what is right, what is good and what is bad. Just choose one program that you think will work and stick to it:)

And really, don't count too much on what you will gain post MBA. The top schools will not necessary guarantee you with the top jobs, and the fact that the market is flooded with MBA holders of all sorts. I generally believe that the HR here hires more based on experience, rather than the origins of your degree. It is usually in countries like the US that really value ivy league versus state colleges.

Try to focus more on the learning experience and networking that can be gained by any program. Look through the courses offered and see if it is to your liking.

I have heard people say that an MBA without GMAT is utterly rubbish. I have heard people say that you must trust only NUS in Singapore, as one must "suffer" with tons of homework and endless classes in order to be considered worthy. I have heard people say that if you do not get into Chicago GSB or Insead, then don't bother doing an MBA and the list goes on and on.

What are your priorities?
What are you willing to sacrifice?
What best fits you?

vesfreq 27-02-2009 08:57 AM

You are rite about instinct. Its tough making a choice. I have to say that I totally agree with you regarding the learning experience and networking part. It makes a big diff.

For guys signing for either mbs, strath or whichever mba, may we be friendly classmates, if ever in the same class. :)

yantao 27-02-2009 11:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vesfreq (Post 35861909)
Anyone going for mba studies?

I'm kinda stuck in between strathclyde and manchester. Both are reputable schools. But, heard a lot of bad rep going on for strathclyde due to poor student support by ymca.

For the guys going through strathclyde via ymca, how is the quality of the support services by ymca? Would poorer or lack of good rep cos' strathclyde to lose credibility or standing in sg? A lot of my lecturers were strathclyde mba holders.

Manchester is a damn tempting one. But, pricy. Right now, the only turn offs are its 2.5 years and more cost. I was also thinking that in terms of ranking and quality, strath and manch not far apart. Only thing is strath rep is a bit affected by ymca, which I really wonder its really that severe.

Constructive replies pls. If anyone is going for mbs mba, drop me a pm. We could try for group discount, which really helps to offset the cost. :yawn:

Not sure whether i can help. I have just graduated from MBS MBA last year and I started in 2005 when it cost $30k and still ranked about 44th in FT ranking.

I must really warn you guys here... It's not a easy to get through this MBA, you need a lot of discipline, classmates support to pull through it... During my first year, lost almost 30% of my classmates as they dropped out, second year slightly better...

Although course work is 2.5 yrs but the dissertation is usually the killer... Typically the faster lot will take another 0.5yrs to complete the dissertation, normal ones another 1yrs and slower ones another 1.5yrs... Since we are mostly working adults, there are occasional hiccups during your course which would cause you to delay the modules...

There are also several killer modules which caused some of my classmates to repeat their modules... So beware, even it's open book exams... The books are useless during the exams, because you are not expected to re-produce contents from the books like typical SG degrees... You would need to full understand the concepts, know-how on how to apply the methodologies...

yantao 28-02-2009 12:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by weicong (Post 35956087)
MBS is taught by the UK lecturers in Singapore? How about Imperial MBA?

Yes, they will fly the UK professors down for a period of 24hrs (over 3 full days or 5 half days)... During these 3 days, it's intensive and also be prepared to burn your weekends doing workshop assignments and presentations which would count towards your module grades.

In additional, MBS also provides "free" local tuition supports (about 3 for each module) which help you to prepare your assignments and examinations. They are conducted by local lecturers whom some of them are former MBS MBA grads too...

cfachick 28-02-2009 01:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yantao (Post 36072080)
Not sure whether i can help. I have just graduated from MBS MBA last year and I started in 2005 when it cost $30k and still ranked about 44th in FT ranking.

I must really warn you guys here... It's not a easy to get through this MBA, you need a lot of discipline, classmates support to pull through it... During my first year, lost almost 30% of my classmates as they dropped out, second year slightly better...

Although course work is 2.5 yrs but the dissertation is usually the killer... Typically the faster lot will take another 0.5yrs to complete the dissertation, normal ones another 1yrs and slower ones another 1.5yrs... Since we are mostly working adults, there are occasional hiccups during your course which would cause you to delay the modules...

There are also several killer modules which caused some of my classmates to repeat their modules... So beware, even it's open book exams... The books are useless during the exams, because you are not expected to re-produce contents from the books like typical SG degrees... You would need to full understand the concepts, know-how on how to apply the methodologies...

Seems like MBS MBA is a tough one.. may I know why did u select the MBS MBA? I understand that there is a certain level of prestige attached to this MBA ( the more recognised one of the lot).

What do u advise? Is it viable for me to work full time, do cfa exams and study MBS MBA at the same time? Do u have classmates who have successfully done that?

yantao 28-02-2009 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cfachick (Post 36073956)
Seems like MBS MBA is a tough one.. may I know why did u select the MBS MBA? I understand that there is a certain level of prestige attached to this MBA ( the more recognised one of the lot).

What do u advise? Is it viable for me to work full time, do cfa exams and study MBS MBA at the same time? Do u have classmates who have successfully done that?

When i was sourcing about back in 2005, there wasn't much options available then. MBS was a tier 2 uni in UK, together with Imperial and Warwick. At the time, only 2 unis in SG is above top 50 in FT ranking, Insead & MBS. I did not consider local unis because I wanted a broader perspective and more flexible timing due to occasional biz trip. It's so flexible that I took one of my module workshop in UK during my biz trip to Germany.

A lot of people under-estimated the time commitment required for taking a MBA. You have combination of 2000 words assignment, intensive workshops and group projects to complete one module. With 2 full modules and 1 half-modules per semester, it's quite pack for a working adult with family commitments. When you first started with the MBA, you have all the zealous required, but those would gradually fade as the reality of the MBA digs in... Work and study fatigue takes toll on you. Classmates drop out or reduce their module per semester...

If you are single and available, then doing CFA at the same time might be possible. Depending on your priorities, MBA is good for general knowledge and management position while CFA is a specialized certification which you give u a better chance of securing a good job. If you are still early in your job career, finish your CFA first before thinking of a MBA. The MBA will come handy later in your career ladder as immediate tangible benefits cannot be realized yet. Chances that your employer might send you for a MBA course later in your career is also possible.

vesfreq 28-02-2009 05:23 PM

I heard horror stories about the mbs syllabus. Guess its what makes the programme worth the effort and time. Hope to grad in 2 years. =:p The cost of failure is really high.

cfachick 01-03-2009 02:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yantao (Post 36082967)
When i was sourcing about back in 2005, there wasn't much options available then. MBS was a tier 2 uni in UK, together with Imperial and Warwick. At the time, only 2 unis in SG is above top 50 in FT ranking, Insead & MBS. I did not consider local unis because I wanted a broader perspective and more flexible timing due to occasional biz trip. It's so flexible that I took one of my module workshop in UK during my biz trip to Germany.

A lot of people under-estimated the time commitment required for taking a MBA. You have combination of 2000 words assignment, intensive workshops and group projects to complete one module. With 2 full modules and 1 half-modules per semester, it's quite pack for a working adult with family commitments. When you first started with the MBA, you have all the zealous required, but those would gradually fade as the reality of the MBA digs in... Work and study fatigue takes toll on you. Classmates drop out or reduce their module per semester...

If you are single and available, then doing CFA at the same time might be possible. Depending on your priorities, MBA is good for general knowledge and management position while CFA is a specialized certification which you give u a better chance of securing a good job. If you are still early in your job career, finish your CFA first before thinking of a MBA. The MBA will come handy later in your career ladder as immediate tangible benefits cannot be realized yet. Chances that your employer might send you for a MBA course later in your career is also possible.

Thanks for ur advice. I don;t know what is my max threshold yet , although still alive from studying for cfa. Read from many places ( esp the AF forum) that cfa and mba are a powerful combination. I believe there is synergy created to do both courses together.

It must have been a great achievement of u to complete the mbs mba. That'll be my personal aim to complete it and the cfa within the next 5 years. Have an insatisfiable thirst for new knowledge and skills and the unexplainable satisfaction from completing a daunting task.

Have been monitoring the mbs course fees, price increase at astronomical rate. Worried of further fee hike if i take it later.

But then a bird in hand is still better than two in the bushes. I will tink it thru carefully...

vesfreq 01-03-2009 10:47 PM

cfachick,

mbs fees are prob due for another hike, cos' of the fx rate. I have to agree with yantao that doing the cfa first will be a better move.

Sometimes, I wish I can turn back the clock and do mbs mba at 35k. Now, its like about 50k to do the mba. :( 15k savings, on the spot. Wow!

charles_73 02-03-2009 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yantao (Post 36072080)
Not sure whether i can help. I have just graduated from MBS MBA last year and I started in 2005 when it cost $30k and still ranked about 44th in FT ranking.

I must really warn you guys here... It's not a easy to get through this MBA, you need a lot of discipline, classmates support to pull through it... During my first year, lost almost 30% of my classmates as they dropped out, second year slightly better...

Although course work is 2.5 yrs but the dissertation is usually the killer... Typically the faster lot will take another 0.5yrs to complete the dissertation, normal ones another 1yrs and slower ones another 1.5yrs... Since we are mostly working adults, there are occasional hiccups during your course which would cause you to delay the modules...

There are also several killer modules which caused some of my classmates to repeat their modules... So beware, even it's open book exams... The books are useless during the exams, because you are not expected to re-produce contents from the books like typical SG degrees... You would need to full understand the concepts, know-how on how to apply the methodologies...

Maybe we were classmates before, I also graduated last year! All thanks to the excellent support of the admin team. In fact, I dont have any classmate who failed but perhaps a few deferred or take fewer modules. Agree that the programme is rigourous but I dont recall such a high drop out rate. I have a hectic work schedule working in bank but I was able to complete the programme 2.5years (crashing the dissertation and the programme) :) It is a tremendous amount of worrk but highly fulfilling - learnt alot of management stuff in this programme.
The key to managing is to study smart like we did! Most of my other classmates graduated in 3 years and we still meet up at the alumni events. Hope that helps

yantao 02-03-2009 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charles_73 (Post 36132596)
Maybe we were classmates before, I also graduated last year! All thanks to the excellent support of the admin team. In fact, I dont have any classmate who failed but perhaps a few deferred or take fewer modules. Agree that the programme is rigourous but I dont recall such a high drop out rate. I have a hectic work schedule working in bank but I was able to complete the programme 2.5years (crashing the dissertation and the programme) :) It is a tremendous amount of worrk but highly fulfilling - learnt alot of management stuff in this programme.
The key to managing is to study smart like we did! Most of my other classmates graduated in 3 years and we still meet up at the alumni events. Hope that helps

You must be from the Financial major, haha, with lesser modules from exemptions... From my engineering side, during the first year quite a few dropped-out... 2.5 yrs is consider really fast, min 3yrs for engineering side... I still have several ex-classmates still doing their dissertations now... almost into their 4th year now...


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