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-   -   Which MBA? (https://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/post-degree-programs-courses-215/mba-1852354.html)

Inspiron510m 28-01-2008 09:55 PM

Which MBA?
 
Dear all, need some advice here on MBAs here.

I've been told by my Managing Director to go take an MBA (to be paid by the company - a rather large Global MNC), before I continue, allow me to provide a little profile

Age: early thirties
Time Commitments: young baby
Work exp : almost 10, 2+ mid mgmt exp
Current job scope : 25% technical, 25% Marketing, 50% Business Growth
Education: Mostly IT with several certifications (which I've stop collecting for a long time), Bachelor and Masters in IT

Location of local provider is not really an issue as I drive.

Aim of MBA : To gain good business knowledge that will help me see things on a (even) bigger horizon and to gain an edge (besides, if my MD wants me to, why not)

Other concerns: Although the MBA is paid by the company, I think the likes of Insead and Chicago are out as I'm in mid management and its too expensive

After some research and thought, I am considering the Strathclyde MBA (local provider is Times Education). Reason being good content (I think), reasonable cost (SGD 30k), good accrediation (AMBA, EQUIS, AACSB) and decent ranking.

Due to personal reasons, I can only take the MBA later this year (if I do take the Strathclyde MBA, it would be the Oct intake) and I understand there will be several MBA fairs along in the year so my decision is not cast in stone yet.

Hence, I'd like to seek some advice from forumers who have took their MBA or are in the midst of shopping for one.

Q: If you were to take an MBA, which one would you choose over the Strathclyde MBA and please kindly share why.

P.S. I'm not interested in the local uni due to personal perferences (although I an get several exemptions if I take the Nanyang MBA).

Constructive disccusion only please
Thanks

darka2000 28-01-2008 10:03 PM

give manchester a thought as well too. they rank 22nd again in 2008. strathclyde did well in their ranking though (2008)... if MBS $45k+ is too much for your co., jointly fund for the course.

Inspiron510m 28-01-2008 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darka2000 (Post 27903672)
give manchester a thought as well too. they rank 22nd again in 2008. strathclyde did well in their ranking though (2008)... if MBS $45k+ is too much for your co., jointly fund for the course.

Hi darka

Sincere thanks for the quick response.
The ranking you mentioned for 2008 , is it the FT ranking? Thanks

cosycatus 28-01-2008 10:47 PM

Hmmm, lot's of people take MBA's in my company ( yeah, we have a similar sponsorship scheme, only thing is any employee can take) so i've gather some info

- NUS/NTU is reallly very academic and workload is VERY heavy. Although the cert is rather recognized at least locally. What i gather is that this MBA is rather good if u are looking for a career switch, eg from engineering to banking cos they build the fundamentals. Sorta like compressing business school into 2 years.

- Stracytle one is rather popular and it focus on soft skills. Furthmore a lot of it's sudents are part time, so the course is nicely tailored for that crowd. They focus more on management stuff, stragtegy, syngergy etc
You might really want to consider this course cos oboviously, ur boss wants to groom you for some upper management position. I've a colleague who just finish it and jump to Mackinsey.

- Why do u try for the Insead one? It's not really that expensive and worth every sense of the $ NOT in terms of course work but the network you can built up there, which to me, is really what an MBA for manager should be all about, esp if u are responsible for growth.....

Inspiron510m 29-01-2008 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cosycatus (Post 27904479)
Hmmm, lot's of people take MBA's in my company ( yeah, we have a similar sponsorship scheme, only thing is any employee can take) so i've gather some info

- NUS/NTU is reallly very academic and workload is VERY heavy. Although the cert is rather recognized at least locally. What i gather is that this MBA is rather good if u are looking for a career switch, eg from engineering to banking cos they build the fundamentals. Sorta like compressing business school into 2 years.

- Stracytle one is rather popular and it focus on soft skills. Furthmore a lot of it's sudents are part time, so the course is nicely tailored for that crowd. They focus more on management stuff, stragtegy, syngergy etc
You might really want to consider this course cos oboviously, ur boss wants to groom you for some upper management position. I've a colleague who just finish it and jump to Mackinsey.

- Why do u try for the Insead one? It's not really that expensive and worth every sense of the $ NOT in terms of course work but the network you can built up there, which to me, is really what an MBA for manager should be all about, esp if u are responsible for growth.....

Hi cosycatus, thanks for the post.

Yes, I undestand the structure of the NTU/NUS MBA and the typical cohort, hence the preference in not taking their MBA

For Insead, my MD took his from an aussie uni that is not branded (he's australian and did his MBA way before coming to SG) so asking him to pay so much for my super branded MBA might be politically touchy... (you what I mean? :look:) Still, I'll take the school into consideration as you have a very valid point - networking which as you have correctly pointed out , is actually one of my KPI under business growth.

Thanks again for your post.

Inspiron510m 29-01-2008 09:30 AM

Dear Forumers, any more recommendations in addition to Manchester Business School and Insead.
Do kindly provide some insight. MBA shopping is an extremely 'difficult task' as the decision will determine half the success, hence I believe that all those who have taken an MBA or are in the midst of shopping for one will have valuable advice / suggestion to share.

Therefore, If you took and MBA or have the intention to take an MBA, which one would you choose if it is not the Strathclyde MBA and please kindly share why.

If you took the Strathclyde MBA, can you also kindly share about why such a choice and some feedback on the program (the good, bad and ugly)

Thanks

lincoln_wang 29-01-2008 09:54 AM

Hi Inspiron510m,

I'm currently undertaking the Strathclyde MBA. I was facing the same dilemma as you and i understand how confusing it can be. For me i narrowed it down to a few offerings which were Nottingham, Bradford, Strathclyde and Manchester as they were around the same price range. My original choice was Manchester mainly due to the ranking, it being more financial sector oriented and where the university was from. However i ended up not choosing Manchester due to their min age of 27 as well as the limitations of having a financial oriented MBA.

Strathclyde was my eventual choice as at that time they were triple accredited and the course was very strategy oriented. From my point of view, an MBA is taken to give you a better understanding of the various aspects of the business and allow you to better perform in a senior management position and being in a senior management position, the ability to develop sound strategies for your organisation is far more important than being well verse in the financial sector. So that was the deciding factor for me.

ac3knight 29-01-2008 10:15 AM

INSEAD is quite highly regarded too

Inspiron510m 29-01-2008 10:45 AM

Hi Lincoln,

Its great to hear from someone who is doing the Strathclyde MBA and understand the reason why it was chosen.

What is the average age group in the programme? I thought I was quite young at 30+ but I guess you are not local and hence, no NS?

If I do choose to do the Strathclyde MBA, could I contact you to understand the programme in greater details?

Quote:

Originally Posted by lincoln_wang (Post 27909319)
Hi Inspiron510m,

I'm currently undertaking the Strathclyde MBA. I was facing the same dilemma as you and i understand how confusing it can be. For me i narrowed it down to a few offerings which were Nottingham, Bradford, Strathclyde and Manchester as they were around the same price range. My original choice was Manchester mainly due to the ranking, it being more financial sector oriented and where the university was from. However i ended up not choosing Manchester due to their min age of 27 as well as the limitations of having a financial oriented MBA.

Strathclyde was my eventual choice as at that time they were triple accredited and the course was very strategy oriented. From my point of view, an MBA is taken to give you a better understanding of the various aspects of the business and allow you to better perform in a senior management position and being in a senior management position, the ability to develop sound strategies for your organisation is far more important than being well verse in the financial sector. So that was the deciding factor for me.


lincoln_wang 29-01-2008 11:02 AM

Hi Inspiron510m,

The avg age group is about 32 so i guess you'll fit right in without any problems. I'm local but i obtained my bachelors before enlisting that's why i'm still reasonable young. Even so i've found no problems engaging with my coursemates.

The good thing about doing this mba is the cohort is roughly about 18 students but each semester you will either have classes with the cohort before yours or the cohort after yours so you will have a good mix of people to network with. The professions are also quite diverse with people in engineering background to finance to IT and entrepreneurs etc so we get different prespective of the different departments. The administrator of the course is also very supportive and we get alot of help from her. The only negative part is maybe the lack of wireless network in the centre but there's LAN connections so its not that bad. I myself personally use mobile broadband.

You can feel free to contact me via pm and i'll give you my mobile number. Just call me if you wanna know more about the course and i'll try to answer any questions you may have. I can also help refer you to the administrator of the course directly.

Macbookpro555 29-01-2008 02:02 PM

I am doing the Strathclyde MBA right now.. There's a fair share of directors in my class whom I can learn from. Agree with Lincoln that my classmates are all from diverse backgrounds. from the typical engineer to the auditor to the civil servant to the general manager and director.
I enjoyed my classes a lot and I feel the teaching is adequate to prepare me for management level.

Administrative support is excellent. So far I have no complaints except the location since it is not near to MRT ( and i dun drive) .

I chose Strathclyde MBA because it is triple accredited , reasonable ranking , strategy focused and
Best all all ... it is value for money.

Other triple accredited MBA in SG will have cost more than 35K.

manchester mba - 45k :eek:
helsinki mba - 36k:s31:
Insead MBA - an arm and a leg :s16:

Strathclyde mba - 28k =:p

darka2000 29-01-2008 02:19 PM

there are also thunderbird (US), henley (UK), bradford, nottingham and birmingham.

warwick & tanaka distance learning MBA not sure are they found in singapore.

lastly of course we should all give a courtesy consideration, our SMU premium MBA. :s8:

Sao Feng 29-01-2008 04:21 PM

Thanks for inputs on Strathclyde MBA. Any current or previous students of Birmingham and Bradford MBA which conducted by MDIS and AEC? Hopefully can get some inputs from you on this 2 MBA programs also.

rahul49 29-01-2008 05:49 PM

INSEAD is obviously the best there is in Singapore. But its extremely difficult to get into. Need a top GMAT score and a very good profile. I figure....how difficult an MBA is to get into reflects on how good it is.

Strathclyde course content looks good...but how is their faculty ? Cant find info about who will be teaching the course.

crankster 29-01-2008 06:04 PM

Have a friend who did the strathclyde mba - still doing same job 2 years after finishing the course. Salary did not increase much either.

Frankly what is the value of an mba these days? There are so many mba graduates out there - it must be the most common masters qualification! The so-called edged has to be seen in that perspective!

Unless you get into a really top notch programe like insead, chicago, LBS, wharton etc, have to question whether it is worth the effort just to add mba behind your name and consider stress to work/life balance.

crankster 29-01-2008 06:11 PM

1 more point - got bond or not ? How long? Don't be beholdened to your company who can then dictate your salary and progression...

Inspiron510m 29-01-2008 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crankster (Post 27917299)
Have a friend who did the strathclyde mba - still doing same job 2 years after finishing the course. Salary did not increase much either.

Frankly what is the value of an mba these days? There are so many mba graduates out there - it must be the most common masters qualification! The so-called edged has to be seen in that perspective!

Unless you get into a really top notch programe like insead, chicago, LBS, wharton etc, have to question whether it is worth the effort just to add mba behind your name and consider stress to work/life balance.

I hate to post this but here goes.
I disagree with your point. Some people took an MBA when they should not have (not ready to utilise one), hence if they are unable to reap the potential benefits, it is no one but the person him/herself to blame.

I'm not being biased or sterotyping etc, people have the right to follow their interest / dream but again, not being able to utilse the MBA does not provide the MBA doesn't provide the edge, rather, the person has not reach the path where the edge is needed.

No offence to anyway.

Lets get back to the constructive discussion on selecting MBAs and not the debate if one is needed (if you are debating, then you don't need one) :)

Inspiron510m 29-01-2008 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crankster (Post 27917446)
1 more point - got bond or not ? How long? Don't be beholdened to your company who can then dictate your salary and progression...

I'll keep this to the last post where it goes out of topic.

Yes, there will be a bond, it there is none, than that is a bonus.

If one cannot investigate and reason out the pro and cons of taking an MBA the bond etc, than again, the person is not ready for the MBA (if you cannot forsee and analyse something that simple, you are not ready for an MBA).

In addition, bonds can always be bought over (btw, this is not a new concept, its common).

Before the argument goes into stuff like bond breaking is not ethical etc etc, may I first state that in the world of business, it is what you can pull off and be successFUL that counts, ethics is subjective as it is tied to culture, having your bond bought over can sometimes be beneficial (hint : means you are being head hunted)

alright, lets get back to topic.

crankster 29-01-2008 10:57 PM

Nah i don't want a debate. Just expressing opinions. I have been headhunted myself so I know that stuff. My cousin did his MBA at Wharton and as usual like most grads from there, he had a top-notch NY consultancy job waiting before he graduated. Anyway, it is your time and your prerogative, so good luck :)

darka2000 30-01-2008 02:33 AM

the enviable salaries we saw at ft.com of ivy league MBA grad are:

i) the western pay scale, which we all know is at least 50%-100% more than asians partly due to the much higher gov tax. its the same story working at silicon valley.

ii) the top biz schs have been selective in shortlisting students to participate in ranking surveys upon grad. those brokers/traders/self employed with high commission payout will be targetted first. there was an article before on how to increase MBA rankings for the audited salary column. the author recommended biz sch to accept brokers/private bankers as top priority student during enrolment.

iii) outside of US/EU, say hewlett packard asia pacific. do you all think their HRD will pay ivy league grad US$100k working as a business development manager 3 years later? hahahaha.

ivy league grads will most probably stay within US/EU because of the salary. the rest of the world will be complemented by mostly non-ivy league grads to fill mgmt positions, for mnc like HP, etc. i personally know of 2 managers from local MNC sponsored by their employers to do a distance learning MBA. another 2 senior personnel got promoted to managers after they started their distance learning MBA.

who says not worthwhile? :s13: of course it will be if the whole world = wall street

*my context is asia where other than insead, most MBA are meant for working adults/professionals at least 32+ yo.

cosycatus 30-01-2008 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inspiron510m (Post 27908930)
Hi cosycatus, thanks for the post.

Yes, I undestand the structure of the NTU/NUS MBA and the typical cohort, hence the preference in not taking their MBA

For Insead, my MD took his from an aussie uni that is not branded (he's australian and did his MBA way before coming to SG) so asking him to pay so much for my super branded MBA might be politically touchy... (you what I mean? :look:) Still, I'll take the school into consideration as you have a very valid point - networking which as you have correctly pointed out , is actually one of my KPI under business growth.

Thanks again for your post.

- I guess u have to weight how open he is to such matters. Some bosses have the fear of their subordinates doing better or having it better than themselves.

- Anyway, the networking from Stra might not be too bad. Seriously, networking is not about meeting top managers, but people from vastly different fields who might actually one day use ur products.
Small doors lead to big doors.

The Stra admin is quite helpful, you can call them up for talk to them for some insight about the class consituent.

samanthalee 30-01-2008 11:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cosycatus (Post 27938023)
Small doors lead to big doors.

That's a great quote! I think I'll put it as my favourite quote on Facebook. :s12:

Inspiron510m 31-01-2008 11:43 AM

So it seems that the Strathclyde MBA suits my needs (I understand that different MBAs suit different ppl's needs so no bashing here please) with perharps alittle more investigation on the Manchester Business School.

Insead is alittle bit tough but I'll keep in at the back of my head.

As there will be Education / MBA fairs along the year, I'd most probably make a decision by June (as I'd need time to prepare for the application documents).

In the meantime, do feel free to provide to the dicussion

Thanks

darka2000 31-01-2008 01:59 PM

my MBA application essay is for sale at S$150 nett non-neg. however it cannot be used if you are applying to my biz sch (which we will talk about at a later stage).

interested please pm me. :s8:

Inspiron510m 01-02-2008 12:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darka2000 (Post 27946966)
my MBA application essay is for sale at S$150 nett non-neg. however it cannot be used if you are applying to my biz sch (which we will talk about at a later stage).

interested please pm me. :s8:


thanks but no thanks, I reckon I'll handle my own essay personally.

Regards

danzodanzo 01-02-2008 01:16 AM

I just took a look at the Strathclyde MBA and seems its flexible learning structure - which combines self-studies, intensive seminars, local tutorials - is quite similar to that of the Manchester MBA - i.e. it does not tie you down to weekly lectures you must mostly attend.
If your job require you to travel, this flexibility will be a plus point.

Here is some info if you like to "investigate" more about the "part-time" Manchester MBA:

1. 8 core modules (finance or biz track) + 4 electives + 1 big personal project/report.
(If you take the engrg business track, you will need to do a group "live" project/report for one company within your group, plus a smaller personal project)

2. Each 5-month module consist of distance-learning self-study supported by study guides/texts and international e-forums, 3 local tutorial sessions, 1 assignment, 1 exams + 25 hours of workshop/seminar conducted by the UK faculty (who usually fly in for 3 full days or 2 evenings + weekend). The workshop can also be attended in any of their teaching centers in HK, Dubai etc..

3. You can take as many or as little modules you want per 5-month semester, so you can take between 2.5 - 5 years to complete (ave 3 years).

4. Local office and teaching center is at 1 Philip Street (Raffles place MRT)
and is directly administered by the Manchester Business School worldwide division
- not via an agent.
(A key plus point for me as not many MBA business school has a local presence directly here).

5. Ranked consistently 22th in the world in the very competitive FT rankings (2006, 2007, latest 2008), triple-accredited.
http://media.ft.com/cms/9fe070e6-ca70-11dc-a960-000077b07658.pdf


Quote:

Originally Posted by Inspiron510m (Post 27945251)
So it seems that the Strathclyde MBA suits my needs (I understand that different MBAs suit different ppl's needs so no bashing here please) with perharps alittle more investigation on the Manchester Business School.

Insead is alittle bit tough but I'll keep in at the back of my head.

As there will be Education / MBA fairs along the year, I'd most probably make a decision by June (as I'd need time to prepare for the application documents).

In the meantime, do feel free to provide to the dicussion

Thanks


delay 01-02-2008 07:56 AM

that ranking is for full time mba

FT also publishes rankings for distance learning mba
http://media.ft.com/cms/a47575cc-d31...00779e2340.pdf

for part time mba you can see business week
http://bwnt.businessweek.com/interac...ol_ptmba_2007/

and then you have economist
http://mba.eiu.com/index.asp?layout=2007rankings

delay 01-02-2008 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darka2000 (Post 27924672)
the enviable salaries we saw at ft.com of ivy league MBA grad are:

i) the western pay scale, which we all know is at least 50%-100% more than asians partly due to the much higher gov tax. its the same story working at silicon valley.

ii) the top biz schs have been selective in shortlisting students to participate in ranking surveys upon grad. those brokers/traders/self employed with high commission payout will be targetted first. there was an article before on how to increase MBA rankings for the audited salary column. the author recommended biz sch to accept brokers/private bankers as top priority student during enrolment.

iii) outside of US/EU, say hewlett packard asia pacific. do you all think their HRD will pay ivy league grad US$100k working as a business development manager 3 years later? hahahaha.

ivy league grads will most probably stay within US/EU because of the salary. the rest of the world will be complemented by mostly non-ivy league grads to fill mgmt positions, for mnc like HP, etc. i personally know of 2 managers from local MNC sponsored by their employers to do a distance learning MBA. another 2 senior personnel got promoted to managers after they started their distance learning MBA.

who says not worthwhile? :s13: of course it will be if the whole world = wall street

*my context is asia where other than insead, most MBA are meant for working adults/professionals at least 32+ yo.

interestingly i was reading the article as well
http://search.ft.com/ftArticle?query...128000078&ct=0

as for salary, you cant do what you suggested. you send the survey to the entire population of students. FT audits them every 5 yrs or when the numbers look odd (one particular uni once bribed a FT chap and got into top 20 and was found out lol)
and if you happen to know which school does it, you can make some money by emailing that info to the school just beneath it LOL!

and i do agree that the salary tend to be biased bcos they grads do tend to stay in US or euro. And most MNCs only hire these people for their internal consulting roles (in HP's case it used to be the SPAM group in US)

and lately, the whole world = wallstreet. haha
just look at the bloodied streets of new york and the world! :P

Inspiron510m 01-02-2008 09:17 AM

Hi danzodanzo,

Firstly, sincere thanks for all your posts, in particular, the one I quoted, it provided me with some useful insights.

Not meaning to be lazy but if you could, can you provide a similar analysis for the Strathclyde MBA? It would be great to see some analysis from a 3rd party point of view.

Regards

Quote:

Originally Posted by danzodanzo (Post 27956833)
I just took a look at the Strathclyde MBA and seems its flexible learning structure - which combines self-studies, intensive seminars, local tutorials - is quite similar to that of the Manchester MBA - i.e. it does not tie you down to weekly lectures you must mostly attend.
If your job require you to travel, this flexibility will be a plus point.

Here is some info if you like to "investigate" more about the "part-time" Manchester MBA:

1. 8 core modules (finance or biz track) + 4 electives + 1 big personal project/report.
(If you take the engrg business track, you will need to do a group "live" project/report for one company within your group, plus a smaller personal project)

2. Each 5-month module consist of distance-learning self-study supported by study guides/texts and international e-forums, 3 local tutorial sessions, 1 assignment, 1 exams + 25 hours of workshop/seminar conducted by the UK faculty (who usually fly in for 3 full days or 2 evenings + weekend). The workshop can also be attended in any of their teaching centers in HK, Dubai etc..

3. You can take as many or as little modules you want per 5-month semester, so you can take between 2.5 - 5 years to complete (ave 3 years).

4. Local office and teaching center is at 1 Philip Street (Raffles place MRT)
and is directly administered by the Manchester Business School worldwide division
- not via an agent.
(A key plus point for me as not many MBA business school has a local presence directly here).

5. Ranked consistently 22th in the world in the very competitive FT rankings (2006, 2007, latest 2008), triple-accredited.
http://media.ft.com/cms/9fe070e6-ca70-11dc-a960-000077b07658.pdf


darka2000 01-02-2008 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by delay (Post 27958334)
that ranking is for full time mba

FT also publishes rankings for distance learning mba
http://media.ft.com/cms/a47575cc-d31...00779e2340.pdf

for part time mba you can see business week
http://bwnt.businessweek.com/interac...ol_ptmba_2007/

and then you have economist
http://mba.eiu.com/index.asp?layout=2007rankings

without a common basis for competitive comparison on p/t & d/l programmes, FT MBA statistics are commonly used to denote the recognition of the course especially when some p/t &d/l certificates bear the same parchment as the FT MBA. in my opinion, all the links you have presented are still lacking in objective/professional assessment. they merely encapsulated student's feedback and enrolment statistics, a far cry of professional assessment on the academical quality. :look:

Quote:

Originally Posted by delay (Post 27958334)
interestingly i was reading the article as well
http://search.ft.com/ftArticle?query...128000078&ct=0

as for salary, you cant do what you suggested. you send the survey to the entire population of students. FT audits them every 5 yrs or when the numbers look odd (one particular uni once bribed a FT chap and got into top 20 and was found out lol)
and if you happen to know which school does it, you can make some money by emailing that info to the school just beneath it LOL!

and i do agree that the salary tend to be biased bcos they grads do tend to stay in US or euro. And most MNCs only hire these people for their internal consulting roles (in HP's case it used to be the SPAM group in US)

and lately, the whole world = wallstreet. haha
just look at the bloodied streets of new york and the world! :P

no all in my cohort received the invitation to participate in survey dude. incidentally, so far i have only noticed 1 job posting from HP/SPAM and requiring 10 yrs exp in the same field which i shy'ed away. bloodshed in Fall Street. run by MBA's, and i would like to stress, the elites! not to worry, the prospect of APAC non FT MBA grad is still good, as long as they are rich in experience and do not ask for the stars and moon.

danzodanzo 01-02-2008 11:47 AM

If you read carefully, the DL MBA list is just Financial Times's picks of top DL MBAs,
- not by rankings.

They only published on global ranking once per year. i.e.
http://media.ft.com/cms/9fe070e6-ca7...0077b07658.pdf

For the case of Manchester and Strathclyde, all MBA formats leads to the same cert.
(You can also opt to fly to UK to do a few modules on campus).
If you are considering a career switch, and/or are early in your career, perhaps a Full-Time MBA is better.
However, if you are mid/top-career, a part-time/exec MBA will fit the bill better,
and you get to network among the current managers of the industries, as well as apply/derive your learnings on-the-job.
(This is the biggest plus point of a Part-Time over a Full-Time MBA, as most Full-Time participants are younger and has NO CURRENT Jobs).

Quote:

Originally Posted by delay (Post 27958281)
that ranking is for full time mba

FT also publishes rankings for distance learning mba
http://media.ft.com/cms/a47575cc-d31...00779e2340.pdf


delay 02-02-2008 05:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darka2000 (Post 27959847)
without a common basis for competitive comparison on p/t & d/l programmes, FT MBA statistics are commonly used to denote the recognition of the course especially when some p/t &d/l certificates bear the same parchment as the FT MBA. in my opinion, all the links you have presented are still lacking in objective/professional assessment. they merely encapsulated student's feedback and enrolment statistics, a far cry of professional assessment on the academical quality. :look:



no all in my cohort received the invitation to participate in survey dude. incidentally, so far i have only noticed 1 job posting from HP/SPAM and requiring 10 yrs exp in the same field which i shy'ed away. bloodshed in Fall Street. run by MBA's, and i would like to stress, the elites! not to worry, the prospect of APAC non FT MBA grad is still good, as long as they are rich in experience and do not ask for the stars and moon.


i totally agree!
all the rankings are skewed 1 way or the other so take it with a pinch of salt!

that said i actually think the ranking of rankings which is like a combination of all the rankings perhaps makes the most sense? maybe, i dunno haha

as for the feedback, if you are serious, write to FT about it. I guarantee you will make more moola than selling your essay :P

btw, this FT ranking is using 2004 grads stats i THINK. :P

delay 02-02-2008 05:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by danzodanzo (Post 27960810)
If you read carefully, the DL MBA list is just Financial Times's picks of top DL MBAs,
- not by rankings.

They only published on global ranking once per year. i.e.
http://media.ft.com/cms/9fe070e6-ca7...0077b07658.pdf

For the case of Manchester and Strathclyde, all MBA formats leads to the same cert.
(You can also opt to fly to UK to do a few modules on campus).
If you are considering a career switch, and/or are early in your career, perhaps a Full-Time MBA is better.
However, if you are mid/top-career, a part-time/exec MBA will fit the bill better,
and you get to network among the current managers of the industries, as well as apply/derive your learnings on-the-job.
(This is the biggest plus point of a Part-Time over a Full-Time MBA, as most Full-Time participants are younger and has NO CURRENT Jobs).

ah, you are right!

and yes, increasingly younger kids are doing their MBA!

Macbookpro555 02-02-2008 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inspiron510m (Post 27958824)
Hi danzodanzo,

Firstly, sincere thanks for all your posts, in particular, the one I quoted, it provided me with some useful insights.

Not meaning to be lazy but if you could, can you provide a similar analysis for the Strathclyde MBA? It would be great to see some analysis from a 3rd party point of view
Regards

Hope the below helps.

Strathclyde MBA

1) One semester is 6 months, 4-5 subjects per 6 months . 6 exams during first year. No exams for second year. for subjects with no exams, fully based on assignments. first year foundation subjects like finance, HR, accounting, marketing. Second year on strategy. average one assignment per month. 16 subjects altogether ( including 3 electives)

2) Strategy MBA with no specific specialisations. Intensive seminars and workshops conducted by strathclyde people ( one intensive seminar per month). local counselling sessions by local lecturers ( average twice a week).

3) No minimum attendance requirement to take the examinations. Option to choose the no. of subjects to be taken per semester.

4) can be completed in 2 years . Max is 6 years.

5) flexibility to transfer to Glasgow or any other centres at any stage .

6) Can do the electives in Glasgow or any other centres ( bahrian, dubai, oman, switzerland, greece , hongkong and etc) at no extra cost.

7) ranked no. 30 in 2008 FT ranking.
http://rankings.ft.com/global-mba-rankings

8) Local partner is times management, minus point is location is not accessible for people who dun drive.

:D

komatineni 03-02-2008 08:29 PM

I think Strathclyde MBA is good choice.
By the way if you can go for the GMAT then SMU is also offering MBA from this year onwards.

Inspiron510m 04-02-2008 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by komatineni (Post 28004341)
I think Strathclyde MBA is good choice.
By the way if you can go for the GMAT then SMU is also offering MBA from this year onwards.

Hi komatineni,

Thanks for highlighting SMU but personally, I think their MBA is overrated (both brand and cost).

Thanks again.

hotdrinks 04-02-2008 11:29 AM

I would go for the Nanyang mba, but that would only be my personal choice. And with no reference to my earlier statement, i would be more concern with the industry's perception of the mba, rather than the perception of the general mass.

But still, at the end of the day its only a door opened. You can walk in, but they can also ask u to walk out haha

komatineni 04-02-2008 06:30 PM

Yeah, i feel the same for SMU after getting some info about the course.
Now i am zoomed in to Manchester Vs Strathclyde .

darka2000 04-02-2008 08:54 PM

with due respect but please apply both. don't be over confident scarli both rejected. i think the success rate was something like 1:2 to 1:3. :D

komatineni 05-02-2008 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darka2000 (Post 28023614)
with due respect but please apply both. don't be over confident scarli both rejected. i think the success rate was something like 1:2 to 1:3. :D

Thanks Bro,

Yeah, I'll apply to both but need to make mind for other reasons :) cost, content etc..

yantao 05-02-2008 06:46 PM

I have currently taking my Manchester MBA. Just finished my course work and working on my personal dissertation. I would like to highlight that this is one of the longest DL MBA, 2.5 yrs for coursework, assignments & exams plus 0.5-2 years for personal dissertation. Most people would not be able to finish the MBA within 3 years, due to the personal dissertation.

What i like about the MBS is that it has 2 majors, engr & finance. Since my background is in IT field, I try to avoid taking some of the finance-bias modules which are very tough for non-finance idiot like myself. However, there are some core-finance modules which is required and they are really tough...

Second thing which i like is the number of study centers they have around the world. If you happen to travel a lot and it clashes with your workshops conducted by the UK professors, you can chose to take the workshop elsewhere in the world.

Maybe i was lucky when i started the course, it's about $30k and the following year, their ranking got promoted and their fees just went straight up. In terms of investment, the returns is even better than my SGX stocks. Let me know if you need more information regarding the course. Cheers.

Quote:

Originally Posted by danzodanzo (Post 27956833)
I just took a look at the Strathclyde MBA and seems its flexible learning structure - which combines self-studies, intensive seminars, local tutorials - is quite similar to that of the Manchester MBA - i.e. it does not tie you down to weekly lectures you must mostly attend.
If your job require you to travel, this flexibility will be a plus point.

Here is some info if you like to "investigate" more about the "part-time" Manchester MBA:

1. 8 core modules (finance or biz track) + 4 electives + 1 big personal project/report.
(If you take the engrg business track, you will need to do a group "live" project/report for one company within your group, plus a smaller personal project)

2. Each 5-month module consist of distance-learning self-study supported by study guides/texts and international e-forums, 3 local tutorial sessions, 1 assignment, 1 exams + 25 hours of workshop/seminar conducted by the UK faculty (who usually fly in for 3 full days or 2 evenings + weekend). The workshop can also be attended in any of their teaching centers in HK, Dubai etc..

3. You can take as many or as little modules you want per 5-month semester, so you can take between 2.5 - 5 years to complete (ave 3 years).

4. Local office and teaching center is at 1 Philip Street (Raffles place MRT)
and is directly administered by the Manchester Business School worldwide division
- not via an agent.
(A key plus point for me as not many MBA business school has a local presence directly here).

5. Ranked consistently 22th in the world in the very competitive FT rankings (2006, 2007, latest 2008), triple-accredited.
http://media.ft.com/cms/9fe070e6-ca70-11dc-a960-000077b07658.pdf


komatineni 05-02-2008 07:27 PM

yantao,

Thats indeed a very good info to know. Yeah, fees definitely an imp factor to consider for me. Other than the pros' about Manchester which you mentioned is there any issues/areas you found quite challenging. i.e. something like the class room composure, experienced folks inside the class, etc. Thx a ton in adv
Plz excuse me if I am asking something which cant be shared.

darka2000 05-02-2008 09:26 PM

hmm interesing revelation. but what's really so difficult about the dissertation yantao? failed and re-take or topic indentification related? :s11:

theonion 05-02-2008 11:46 PM

Just curious, what kind of work do Sg-based MBAs do? Will it be similar to those listed here?

http://www.bankersball.com/2008/02/0...umes/#more-871

And how is the lower half of the first tier US B schools like Tuck, Darden, Kellogg, Fuqua, Haas etc viewed in Sg's context? Is it worth looking at Asian opportunities if you have a MBA from these schools?

I am asking cos a close friend of mine has just got accepted to Fuqua and Darden, and her family wants her to return to Sg after her MBA.

danzodanzo 06-02-2008 12:50 PM

Yantao,

Thanks for sharing.
Yap, is the personal project very difficult?

What major did you take? which are the most tough and most useful/worthwhile modules or experience you get from the MBA?

Wow, $30K is a very good deal you had, compared to about $45K now :)
NUS is now ard $35K, and SMU is over $53K!

When you say ROI is better than SGX stocks, can you elaborate?

Thanks.

yantao 06-02-2008 02:15 PM

We have quite a good mix of students in the class, some German, some British students and occasionally some students from Russia & Kenya. The student support center is not as big as you think, as MBS only occupy one floor in the building with 2 classrooms, 1 small staff lounge and a small library & chill-out area.

A lot of discussions and experience sharing within the classroom environments, so unless you have quite a bit of working experiences, it would be hard for you to relate it back to your workplace. Let me know if you need more experience. Cheers.

Quote:

Originally Posted by komatineni (Post 28040608)
yantao,
Thats indeed a very good info to know. Yeah, fees definitely an imp factor to consider for me. Other than the pros' about Manchester which you mentioned is there any issues/areas you found quite challenging. i.e. something like the class room composure, experienced folks inside the class, etc. Thx a ton in adv
Plz excuse me if I am asking something which cant be shared.


yantao 06-02-2008 02:30 PM

Haha, trust me... you would need a hell lot of perseverance and peer support to finish the courseworks & exams, however once you hit the dissertation part, you might start to slack since there is no pressure or immediate deadline to meet. Work & family starts to creep back into your designated study hours...

For topic selection of your dissertation, it's really up to you. Most students' dissertation are based around projects in their work environment which is easier to relate and "kill 2 birds with one stone". And work projects are sometimes "flexible", in terms of timeline and scope, so if your work projects are supervisor approval, delayed, postponed, cut-down, etc, you would find yourself unable to complete the dissertation or re-start on another topic... Others, will do research which takes a lot time to get approval...

Especially some of the killer subjects (like International Business Strategy & Strategic Management) are placed right at the last semester before you start on your dissertation. Every years about 30-40% of the previous batch will have to re-take their exams, in terms of morale & commitments, it will be hard for them to balance with working on dissertation also... So delay another 6 months...

Just got my results for my final semester, managed to get pass the Strategic Management module and already heard 3 of my classmates (out of less than 20 takers in SG) going to repeat this module already... Very tough module to get past... **Update**, now got 4 of them didnt make it for Strategic Management module.

Quote:

Originally Posted by darka2000 (Post 28042810)
hmm interesting revelation. but what's really so difficult about the dissertation yantao? failed and re-take or topic indentification related? :s11:


yantao 06-02-2008 02:52 PM

As mentioned above, the personal project is not very tough, but more mentally challenging after 2.5 years of coursework & exams.

Mine is Engr major so I have modules like Project Management (after which i went for my PMP certification), Supply chain management, Law & Ethics in Global Business, etc. For more financial inclined people, there are advance economics, corporate finance, etc to suit your taste. As mentioned above, the 2 killer modules, for me another one is financial management... all the NPV, IRR, etc... and you have to solve those questions during exam!! it's crazy for non-financial people like me...

This MBA provides me with a more holistic and also in-depth view of a MNC, how every single departments play their part in the functioning of the company. Esp, for a IT person like myself. Before that, what the heck is HR or Corporate Risk management required?

In terms of ROI, i was talking about my stocks in Singapore Stock Exchange (SGX)... Haha, sorry if you do not trade shares... Actually, i got motivated to trade shares after one of the modules (managerial economics). Well, seeing your investment raise from $30k to $45k in 2 years is a nice value-add.

Quote:

Originally Posted by danzodanzo (Post 28054883)
Yantao,

Thanks for sharing.
Yap, is the personal project very difficult?

What major did you take? which are the most tough and most useful/worthwhile modules or experience you get from the MBA?

Wow, $30K is a very good deal you had, compared to about $45K now :)
NUS is now ard $35K, and SMU is over $53K!

When you say ROI is better than SGX stocks, can you elaborate?

Thanks.


komatineni 06-02-2008 06:48 PM

Thanks a ton for your feedback.
Yeah I tend to agree with that. After spending all the weekends, weekdays evenings at course when you've lil freedom one tend to relax a bit.
So now you are a PMP ;) good to hear that. recently lot of people going for it.

danzodanzo 06-02-2008 11:14 PM

Thanks for great info sharing.

Regarding the 3 killer modules,
Can you share more on the experience from International Business Strategy and Finance Management....
How's their pass rate??
I presume they are also in the last semester and a lot of study time needed as well....



Quote:

Originally Posted by yantao (Post 28056674)
Haha, trust me... you would need a hell lot of perseverance and peer support to finish the courseworks & exams, however once you hit the dissertation part, you might start to slack since there is no pressure or immediate deadline to meet. Work & family starts to creep back into your designated study hours...

For topic selection of your dissertation, it's really up to you. Most students' dissertation are based around projects in their work environment which is easier to relate and "kill 2 birds with one stone". And work projects are sometimes "flexible", in terms of timeline and scope, so if your work projects are supervisor approval, delayed, postponed, cut-down, etc, you would find yourself unable to complete the dissertation or re-start on another topic... Others, will do research which takes a lot time to get approval...

Especially some of the killer subjects (like International Business Strategy & Strategic Management) are placed right at the last semester before you start on your dissertation. Every years about 30-40% of the previous batch will have to re-take their exams, in terms of morale & commitments, it will be hard for them to balance with working on dissertation also... So delay another 6 months...

Just got my results for my final semester, managed to get pass the Strategic Management module and already heard 3 of my classmates (out of less than 20 takers in SG) going to repeat this module already... Very tough module to get past... **Update**, now got 4 of them didnt make it for Strategic Management module.



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