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IWDA ETF - One of the Best ETF

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Old 05-03-2018, 08:50 AM   #46
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Looking at the exchange rate, IB would win out in the 5-10k range on a yearly basis.

One stands to lose about $150 or 3% of $5000 for in/out using SCB. IB exchanges at near spot rate. Might need those who use it to get more exact figures.
The $150 you pay SCB, might as well pay IB $120 for inactivity fees which also includes your trading fees.

And then you add in the minimum comms charged by SCB, and IB becomes a clear winner.
can give an example of the exchange rate for SCB and IB
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Old 05-03-2018, 02:36 PM   #47
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Is scb really that bad? I tried changing recently then went to google the exchange rate on Google, come out same value leh
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Old 05-03-2018, 08:29 PM   #48
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Is scb really that bad? I tried changing recently then went to google the exchange rate on Google, come out same value leh
SCB
USD to SGD
Indicative Rate = 0.761589(1.312971)
Indicative Amount = USD 76.94 for SGD 101.02
SGD to USD
Indicative Rate = 1.325739
Indicative Amount = SGD 101.02 for USD 76.19

It was bad, recently, they improved. The above is latest.
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Old 05-03-2018, 09:36 PM   #49
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SCB
USD to SGD
Indicative Rate = 0.761589(1.312971)
Indicative Amount = USD 76.94 for SGD 101.02
SGD to USD
Indicative Rate = 1.325739
Indicative Amount = SGD 101.02 for USD 76.19

It was bad, recently, they improved. The above is latest.
Hence I've been sticking with SCB all this while...
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Old 06-03-2018, 02:59 AM   #50
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Hence I've been sticking with SCB all this while...
The goal is $200k aum.
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Old 06-03-2018, 05:51 AM   #51
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What's the best way to invest in IWDA? Is a mixture of IWDA + EIMI is the way to go?
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Old 06-03-2018, 12:49 PM   #52
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How about buying it via poems? Only need to pay for the normal charges plus gst? Any other fees that I have to take into consideration?

Also reinvesting the dividends, how does it work? Let's say I buy 10 shares, then after a year later, my value will increase to the price of 10 shares plus the dividends that were reinvested?
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Old 06-03-2018, 07:47 PM   #53
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How about buying it via poems? Only need to pay for the normal charges plus gst? Any other fees that I have to take into consideration?

Also reinvesting the dividends, how does it work? Let's say I buy 10 shares, then after a year later, my value will increase to the price of 10 shares plus the dividends that were reinvested?
custodian fee per counter. unless u make 6 trades in a quarter

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Old 06-03-2018, 09:40 PM   #54
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IWDA automatically reinvest the dividends for you, right?

Do you need to pay tax on the "dividends"? Eg subject to 30% tax?
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Old 06-03-2018, 11:02 PM   #55
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IWDA automatically reinvest the dividends for you, right?
Yes.

Do you need to pay tax on the "dividends"? Eg subject to 30% tax?
No. The fund manager pays any/all foreign taxes within the fund, including the 15% Irish treaty tax rate on U.S. stock dividends (for example). So the reinvested dividends are net of tax, all handled within the fund itself. Check the prospectus for details, but that's my understanding.

For non-U.S. persons who are residents of Singapore, and at least for personal accounts, that's the end of the tax story. If you're a U.S. person, or if you're a resident of another country, there may be tax consequences beyond what the fund is handling.
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Old 07-03-2018, 12:32 AM   #56
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I glanced the returns of IWDA and VRWD, the returns slightly better for VRWD, makes me think how IWDA agents reinvest dividends? On dividend reinvestment date, does it open higher auto? Do they tell us the dates which this take place?
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Old 07-03-2018, 12:44 AM   #57
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I glanced the returns of IWDA and VRWD, the returns slightly better for VRWD, makes me think how IWDA agents reinvest dividends?
They're somewhat different portfolios, so they're not directly comparable. VRWD includes some emerging market stocks. That's the most likely reason there are differences in the returns over arbitrary periods of time.

Dividends are continuously reinvested in IWDA, and stocks vary in when their dividends are paid. It's rather likely there's at least one dividend paying stock in IWDA's portfolio that's paying a dividend on any given business day. You don't really need the dividend dates from BlackRock, because they're the same dates for every shareholder. Just look at the holdings within the fund. For example, if IWDA is holding some Citigroup stock (ticker symbol C) -- and it is -- then it got the most recent Citi dividend payment on February 23, 2018. How do I know that? I just looked up when Citi paid its most recent dividend to its shareholders, and that's the date. BlackRock (IWDA's fund manager) is a shareholder like any other. Well, OK, a gigantic shareholder, but they get paid at the same time.
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Old 07-03-2018, 12:51 AM   #58
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Thanks BBC! I think granted we cannot really tell how much the dividends are reinvested back to us or given the the fund managers.
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Old 07-03-2018, 01:02 AM   #59
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I think granted we cannot really tell how much the dividends are reinvested back to us or given the the fund managers.
You can find that information in the fund prospectus. Dividends (less taxes) are reinvested as they're received. The IWDA fund managers (BlackRock) are paid (last I checked) 0.20%/year of total fund assets, including yours.
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Old 07-03-2018, 06:21 AM   #60
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Yes.


No. The fund manager pays any/all foreign taxes within the fund, including the 15% Irish treaty tax rate on U.S. stock dividends (for example). So the reinvested dividends are net of tax, all handled within the fund itself. Check the prospectus for details, but that's my understanding.

For non-U.S. persons who are residents of Singapore, and at least for personal accounts, that's the end of the tax story. If you're a U.S. person, or if you're a resident of another country, there may be tax consequences beyond what the fund is handling.
Thanks for the answers!
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