HWZ Forums

Login Register FAQ Mark Forums Read

5V 3A charger OK for smartphone and tablet?

Like Tree4Likes
  • 1 Post By stylechap
  • 1 Post By Teo Ming Ern
  • 1 Post By eric3743
  • 1 Post By eric3743
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 17-11-2018, 05:45 PM   #1
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 8,794
5V 3A charger OK for smartphone and tablet?

I have the following:
(1) a smartphone with a charger that says:

Input: 100-240 V, 50/60Hz 0.2 A
Output: 5V 1A

(2) Tablet with a charger that says:

Input: 100-240 V, 50/60Hz 0.15 A
Output: 5V 1A

Basically, everything is the same except for the portion in red.

I did some Googling, and so far, what I could find talked more about the output rather than the input side. They said that the higher the OUTPUT ampere (A), the faster the device will be charged.

I saw two chargers sold at Fairprice. One has Output of 5V 2.1A and another of 5V 3A. Both have the "Safety Mark".

My question is: will using a higher ampere charger damage the devices? After all, the original charger supplied was only 1A, so there must be a reason why the manufacturer set it at 1A?

Last edited by Papermate; 17-11-2018 at 08:37 PM..
Papermate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2018, 07:40 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,680
Your device only take in what it is capable of
Anything more is useless

There are certain device which may not charge as fast using a high ampere charger compared to a lower one.
For example,I have a redmi note 3G and 1st gen 10k xiaomi powerbank. If you use 2A charger it will charge slower than a 1A charger.
Thus i always recommend original charger and cable because nowadays phone maker use their own charging algorithm.
Papermate likes this.
stylechap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2018, 08:54 AM   #3
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 9,364
I have the following:
(1) a smartphone with a charger that says:

Input: 100-240 V, 50/60Hz 0.2 A
Output: 5V 1A

(2) Tablet with a charger that says:

Input: 100-240 V, 50/60Hz 0.15 A
Output: 5V 1A

Basically, everything is the same except for the portion in red.

I did some Googling, and so far, what I could find talked more about the output rather than the input side. They said that the higher the OUTPUT ampere (A), the faster the device will be charged.

I saw two chargers sold at Fairprice. One has Output of 5V 2.1A and another of 5V 3A. Both have the "Safety Mark".

My question is: will using a higher ampere charger damage the devices? After all, the original charger supplied was only 1A, so there must be a reason why the manufacturer set it at 1A?
Dude, the input figures is what the charger accepts from the wall socket. Our wall sockets output a maximum of 13A, 250 V current. As long as the wall charger is built properly, it will step down the current from the wall socket properly and output the correct current to your mobile device. Your mobile device should also have a charging circuitry which limits the amount of current that can be passed to the device plus thermal cut-off circuitry to prevent overheating and the battery from exploding. Cheap mobile devices from China (those cheap brand ones), the manufacturer may cut corners from these areas. Which is one major issues with these made in China tablets or phones which are not internationally branded. Xiaomi is fine definitely. But other brands like Cube, Onda, etc... I won't trust... I've been there done that... not worth your money.
Papermate likes this.
Teo Ming Ern is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2018, 11:38 AM   #4
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 8,794
Your device only take in what it is capable of
Anything more is useless


There are certain device which may not charge as fast using a high ampere charger compared to a lower one.
For example,I have a redmi note 3G and 1st gen 10k xiaomi powerbank. If you use 2A charger it will charge slower than a 1A charger.
Thus i always recommend original charger and cable because nowadays phone maker use their own charging algorithm.
Dude, the input figures is what the charger accepts from the wall socket. Our wall sockets output a maximum of 13A, 250 V current. As long as the wall charger is built properly, it will step down the current from the wall socket properly and output the correct current to your mobile device. Your mobile device should also have a charging circuitry which limits the amount of current that can be passed to the device plus thermal cut-off circuitry to prevent overheating and the battery from exploding. Cheap mobile devices from China (those cheap brand ones), the manufacturer may cut corners from these areas. Which is one major issues with these made in China tablets or phones which are not internationally branded. Xiaomi is fine definitely. But other brands like Cube, Onda, etc... I won't trust... I've been there done that... not worth your money.
Thanks to both of you.

My smartphone is a reputable brand, Huawei, though not top of the line. My tablet is also a well known brand, Samsung Galaxy, again not top of the line.

So far, using the original chargers which came with the box, everything worked. No heat was felt...nothing like a hot boiled egg, and even when my smartphone was fully charged, and I forget to plug it off the charger, it remained cool. Same for my tablet.

As I wrote above, I am wondering if an aftermarket charger sold at Fairprice which has an output of 5V 2.1A or 5V 3A would damage these two devices.

Why I am looking at these chargers with a higher output ampere is because I want to charge my smartphone and tablet faster.

According to stylechap's words in red, it would not charge faster. Teo Ming Ern (words in red) appeared to agree with this.

So I guess this higher ampere output is really meaningless.

Sigh. Looks like there is no way I can charge my stuff faster than my original chargers.
Papermate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2018, 02:14 PM   #5
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 5,192
I have the following:
(1) a smartphone with a charger that says:

Input: 100-240 V, 50/60Hz 0.2 A
Output: 5V 1A

(2) Tablet with a charger that says:

Input: 100-240 V, 50/60Hz 0.15 A
Output: 5V 1A

Basically, everything is the same except for the portion in red.

I did some Googling, and so far, what I could find talked more about the output rather than the input side. They said that the higher the OUTPUT ampere (A), the faster the device will be charged.

I saw two chargers sold at Fairprice. One has Output of 5V 2.1A and another of 5V 3A. Both have the "Safety Mark".

My question is: will using a higher ampere charger damage the devices? After all, the original charger supplied was only 1A, so there must be a reason why the manufacturer set it at 1A?
Input may not be much relevance and link on the explanation.

Understanding Power Supply Requirements for Your Effects Pedals


On the other side for Output this is where it would be of much importance to take note.

Read > Choosing power supply, how to get the voltage and current ratings?

For my case i would prefer to go for Output 5V 2.1A in order to provide all devices including those required up to 2A at most.
There is no need at present to go for higher than necessary.

Beside you need to take note on the brand and marking on local "Safety" approval to ensure it meets the requirement.

And also take note on the charging cable itself as not all are made equal.


Do take note that Manufacturer has to take into consideration on cost overall in production and supplies, etc.
So basically they will go for the minimum specification of the intended product use for.
Papermate likes this.
eric3743 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2018, 09:58 PM   #6
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 8,794
Input may not be much relevance and link on the explanation.

Understanding Power Supply Requirements for Your Effects Pedals


On the other side for Output this is where it would be of much importance to take note.

Read > Choosing power supply, how to get the voltage and current ratings?

For my case i would prefer to go for Output 5V 2.1A in order to provide all devices including those required up to 2A at most.
There is no need at present to go for higher than necessary.

Beside you need to take note on the brand and marking on local "Safety" approval to ensure it meets the requirement.

And also take note on the charging cable itself as not all are made equal.


Do take note that Manufacturer has to take into consideration on cost overall in production and supplies, etc.
So basically they will go for the minimum specification of the intended product use for.
The apple example in your second link above is an interesting explanation for the layman.


If Johnny wants to eat two apples, he's only going to eat two whether you put 2, 3, 5, or 20 apples on the table.

A device that wants 2 A of current works the same way. It will draw 2 A whether the power supply can only provide the 2 A, or whether it could have supplied 3, 5, or 20 A.

The current rating of a supply is what it can deliver, not what it will always force thru the load somehow. In that sense, unlike with voltage, the current rating of a power supply must be at least what the device wants but there is no harm in it being higher. A 9 volt 5 amp supply is a superset of a 9 volt 2 amp supply, for example.
So, I guess it should be safe to use an aftermarket charger labelled 5V 2.1 A or 5V 3A even if the one supplied by the smartphone or tablet manufacturer is 5V 1A. As long as it is a higher ampere, it should be OK...according to the above.
Papermate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-11-2018, 01:46 PM   #7
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 9,364
The apple example in your second link above is an interesting explanation for the layman.

So, I guess it should be safe to use an aftermarket charger labelled 5V 2.1 A or 5V 3A even if the one supplied by the smartphone or tablet manufacturer is 5V 1A. As long as it is a higher ampere, it should be OK...according to the above.
Yes of course it's safe to use a higher specced output charger... as I say, your device will control how much current is fed to charging circuit... just like iPad chargers can charge iPhones even though those chargers are specced to charge at a much higher currents than the iPhone charger.

For you, I guess buying a higher spec wall charger is just future proofing your charger... when you next change your phone, it may be able to take in more current (i.e. have fast charging capability) and so your now old wall charger will still be useful and no longer be the bottleneck to your phone's or tablet's slower than expected charging rates...
Teo Ming Ern is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-11-2018, 02:08 PM   #8
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 8,794
Yes of course it's safe to use a higher specced output charger... as I say, your device will control how much current is fed to charging circuit... just like iPad chargers can charge iPhones even though those chargers are specced to charge at a much higher currents than the iPhone charger.

For you, I guess buying a higher spec wall charger is just future proofing your charger... when you next change your phone, it may be able to take in more current (i.e. have fast charging capability) and so your now old wall charger will still be useful and no longer be the bottleneck to your phone's or tablet's slower than expected charging rates...
Re: your second para

My old wall chargers (one from Huawei and the other from Samsung) which came in the box when I bought them only have Output of 5V 1A.

I don't know what maximum ampere both these devices take. If it is only 1 ampere, then even if I use a charger that supplies more ampere, I guess they will only take in 1 ampere?

I don't understand that portion in red...

Btw, I understand that the cable used also makes a difference to the charging capability...is that true?
Papermate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-11-2018, 02:52 PM   #9
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 5,192
Re: your second para

My old wall chargers (one from Huawei and the other from Samsung) which came in the box when I bought them only have Output of 5V 1A.

I don't know what maximum ampere both these devices take. If it is only 1 ampere, then even if I use a charger that supplies more ampere, I guess they will only take in 1 ampere?

I don't understand that portion in red...

Btw, I understand that the cable used also makes a difference to the charging capability...is that true?
Download this Ampere App

Charge the phone and open the Ampere App to see the maximum & minimum ampere while charging the phone.


There do have cables damaged or worn out due to wear & tear + usage.
That's if the charging is not normal charge time or unable to charge properly then it may be time to replace the cable.

Standard cables are meant for normal usage and may not be suitable for those fast charging.

Some cable are not suitable for data usage as in transferring data between phones &or computer.
I have found out this when i try to purchase so-called 'data' cable but unable to provide proper transfer.
Hence there are differences in cables.
Papermate likes this.
eric3743 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-11-2018, 04:10 PM   #10
Supremacy Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 8,794
Download this Ampere App

Charge the phone and open the Ampere App to see the maximum & minimum ampere while charging the phone.


There do have cables damaged or worn out due to wear & tear + usage.
That's if the charging is not normal charge time or unable to charge properly then it may be time to replace the cable.

Standard cables are meant for normal usage and may not be suitable for those fast charging.

Some cable are not suitable for data usage as in transferring data between phones &or computer.
I have found out this when i try to purchase so-called 'data' cable but unable to provide proper transfer.
Hence there are differences in cables.
Just installed it on my Huawei cell phone. App is rather small at 5.8 mb, so does not take up too much of my phone internal memory. Installation was super fast...split seconds actually unlike other Apps I installed which took a minute or even a bit longer.

So, here's the reading when I clicked on the icon which just joined the family of icons on my home screen.

- 500 mA
min: -160 mA ................max: -500 mA

Max. Capacity: 3000 mAh
Voltage: 4.201 V
The number in red, at the top centre, fluctuates. It's now 700 mA....whoops! it just dropped to 540 mA now.
Papermate is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Important Forum Advisory Note
This forum is moderated by volunteer moderators who will react only to members' feedback on posts. Moderators are not employees or representatives of HWZ. Forum members and moderators are responsible for their own posts.

Please refer to our Terms of Service for more information.


Thread Tools

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On