China Suggests Attack on Taiwan Can't Be Called 'Invasion'

edwarde2

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Beijing has given the strongest hint yet that it would reject attempts to categorize a future attack on Taiwan as an "invasion," after a government official suggested the term wouldn't apply to another "part of China."

The Chinese government in Beijing, established after the Chinese Civil War in 1949, has never governed Taiwan, whose president, Tsai Ing-wen, describes the island democracy as a "functionally independent" country, albeit one with limited recognition by a handful of U.N. member states.

China's ambition to annex the island is stifled only by Taiwanese will to resist and continued security assistance from the United States, which has remained Taiwan's strongest international backer for decades despite switching formal diplomatic recognition from Taipei to Beijing in 1979.

china-says-taiwan-attack-wouldnt-invasion.webp

Secretary of State Antony Blinken attends a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on April 26, 2022. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin protested Blinken’s remarks in an April 27 press conference after senior American diplomat said the U.S. would ensure Taiwan had “all necessary mean†to defend itself against aggression by China.AL DRAGO/POOL/GETTY IMAGES

During a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Tuesday, lawmakers pressed Secretary of State Antony Blinken for assurances that the administration of President Joe Biden would help sustain this long-standing "status quo" across the Taiwan Strait, primarily through the transfer of arms and training.

"We are determined to make sure that [Taiwan] has all the necessary means to defend itself against any potential aggression, including unilateral action by China to disrupt the status quo that's been in place now for many decades," Blinken said.

On Wednesday, Wang Wenbin, a spokesperson for the Chinese Foreign Ministry, voiced opposition to Blinken's comments. He suggested they were inconsistent with the U.S.'s "one China" policy, which recognizes the legitimacy of Beijing's governance over mainland China, but only acknowledges its claim to Taiwan.

Officially, the U.S. considers the status of Taiwan, a Japanese colony from 1895 to 1945, to be undetermined under international law. As such, it takes no position on sovereignty over the island. In 2021, after a summit with Chinese leader Xi Jinping, Biden appeared to endorse Taiwanese self-determination, saying: "Let them make up their mind."

"Since Taiwan is a part of China, how can the mainland 'invade' Taiwan?" Wang said, according to a Chinese-language transcript of his remarks. Incidentally, Beijing hasn't publicly called Russia's war against Ukraine an "invasion" either.

An English version on the Foreign Ministry's website included an additional line not said by the official: "The U.S. admits that Taiwan is part of China, but keeps talking about the mainland's potential 'aggression' of Taiwan. Isn't this self-contradictory since a country cannot 'invade' part of its own territory?"

Despite what appears to be a clear disagreement between Beijing and Washington in interpreting the status quo, Wang accused the U.S. of "reneging" on its commitments. It would push Taiwan into "dangerous waters" and lead to "unbearable cost" for America, too, he said.

china-says-taiwan-attack-wouldnt-invasion.webp

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin attends a regular press briefing in Beijing on November 9, 2020. Wang suggested at a press conference on April 27, 2022, that China would reject attempts to classify a future attack on Taiwan as an “invasion,†as it considers the island part of its territory.GREG BAKER/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

The U.S. has stepped up efforts to help Taiwan bolster its self-defense, but it hasn't publicly committed to come to its defense in the event of a Chinese attack. Under the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979, successive American administrations have supplied Taiwan with defensive weapons, but all have stopped short of an ironclad guarantee of direct military support—a deliberate policy of "strategic ambiguity" that keeps both sides guessing.

Taiwan's fate has been the subject of renewed attention in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. While Taiwanese officials don't believe an attack is imminent, they do see an alarming buildup of Chinese capabilities, and are trying to instill a sense of urgency in Taiwan's public.

When asked the perennial question about a hypothetical response to a future move on the island, senior U.S. officials have instead pointed to the need to increase deterrence in the Taiwan Strait by raising awareness among America's key allies.

"Certainly, we have expressed our concerns about China taking efforts to unilaterally change the status quo, and we think they are carefully looking at what's happening in Ukraine to learn lessons writ large, including with respect to Taiwan," Jake Sullivan, the president's national security adviser, told The Economic Club earlier this month.

He continued: "Now for the U.S. ourselves, the situation with Ukraine and the situation with Taiwan are not the same. Our relationship with Taiwan is governed by the Taiwan Relations Act; our security partnership is governed by the Taiwan Relations Act.

"One of the things that we have focused on in the past several weeks is actually deep consultations with allies and partners, including in Europe, to say: 'This kind of thing can happen in Europe; this kind of thing can also happen in the Indo-Pacific.'

"It's incumbent upon responsible countries in the world to send a clear message that any type of aggression is unacceptable wherever it happens."

Asked whether that meant an explicit U.S. aim to defend Taiwan against an invasion, Sullivan concluded: "Our official government policy is that we're going to take every step we possibly can to ensure that never happens."

The State Department and Taiwan's Foreign Ministry didn't respond to Newsweek's request for comment before publication.
 

croc1977

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Beijing has given the strongest hint yet that it would reject attempts to categorize a future attack on Taiwan as an "invasion," after a government official suggested the term wouldn't apply to another "part of China."

The Chinese government in Beijing, established after the Chinese Civil War in 1949, has never governed Taiwan, whose president, Tsai Ing-wen, describes the island democracy as a "functionally independent" country, albeit one with limited recognition by a handful of U.N. member states.

China's ambition to annex the island is stifled only by Taiwanese will to resist and continued security assistance from the United States, which has remained Taiwan's strongest international backer for decades despite switching formal diplomatic recognition from Taipei to Beijing in 1979.

china-says-taiwan-attack-wouldnt-invasion.webp

Secretary of State Antony Blinken attends a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on April 26, 2022. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin protested Blinken’s remarks in an April 27 press conference after senior American diplomat said the U.S. would ensure Taiwan had “all necessary mean†to defend itself against aggression by China.AL DRAGO/POOL/GETTY IMAGES

During a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Tuesday, lawmakers pressed Secretary of State Antony Blinken for assurances that the administration of President Joe Biden would help sustain this long-standing "status quo" across the Taiwan Strait, primarily through the transfer of arms and training.

"We are determined to make sure that [Taiwan] has all the necessary means to defend itself against any potential aggression, including unilateral action by China to disrupt the status quo that's been in place now for many decades," Blinken said.

On Wednesday, Wang Wenbin, a spokesperson for the Chinese Foreign Ministry, voiced opposition to Blinken's comments. He suggested they were inconsistent with the U.S.'s "one China" policy, which recognizes the legitimacy of Beijing's governance over mainland China, but only acknowledges its claim to Taiwan.

Officially, the U.S. considers the status of Taiwan, a Japanese colony from 1895 to 1945, to be undetermined under international law. As such, it takes no position on sovereignty over the island. In 2021, after a summit with Chinese leader Xi Jinping, Biden appeared to endorse Taiwanese self-determination, saying: "Let them make up their mind."

"Since Taiwan is a part of China, how can the mainland 'invade' Taiwan?" Wang said, according to a Chinese-language transcript of his remarks. Incidentally, Beijing hasn't publicly called Russia's war against Ukraine an "invasion" either.

An English version on the Foreign Ministry's website included an additional line not said by the official: "The U.S. admits that Taiwan is part of China, but keeps talking about the mainland's potential 'aggression' of Taiwan. Isn't this self-contradictory since a country cannot 'invade' part of its own territory?"

Despite what appears to be a clear disagreement between Beijing and Washington in interpreting the status quo, Wang accused the U.S. of "reneging" on its commitments. It would push Taiwan into "dangerous waters" and lead to "unbearable cost" for America, too, he said.

china-says-taiwan-attack-wouldnt-invasion.webp

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin attends a regular press briefing in Beijing on November 9, 2020. Wang suggested at a press conference on April 27, 2022, that China would reject attempts to classify a future attack on Taiwan as an “invasion,†as it considers the island part of its territory.GREG BAKER/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

The U.S. has stepped up efforts to help Taiwan bolster its self-defense, but it hasn't publicly committed to come to its defense in the event of a Chinese attack. Under the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979, successive American administrations have supplied Taiwan with defensive weapons, but all have stopped short of an ironclad guarantee of direct military support—a deliberate policy of "strategic ambiguity" that keeps both sides guessing.

Taiwan's fate has been the subject of renewed attention in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. While Taiwanese officials don't believe an attack is imminent, they do see an alarming buildup of Chinese capabilities, and are trying to instill a sense of urgency in Taiwan's public.

When asked the perennial question about a hypothetical response to a future move on the island, senior U.S. officials have instead pointed to the need to increase deterrence in the Taiwan Strait by raising awareness among America's key allies.

"Certainly, we have expressed our concerns about China taking efforts to unilaterally change the status quo, and we think they are carefully looking at what's happening in Ukraine to learn lessons writ large, including with respect to Taiwan," Jake Sullivan, the president's national security adviser, told The Economic Club earlier this month.

He continued: "Now for the U.S. ourselves, the situation with Ukraine and the situation with Taiwan are not the same. Our relationship with Taiwan is governed by the Taiwan Relations Act; our security partnership is governed by the Taiwan Relations Act.

"One of the things that we have focused on in the past several weeks is actually deep consultations with allies and partners, including in Europe, to say: 'This kind of thing can happen in Europe; this kind of thing can also happen in the Indo-Pacific.'

"It's incumbent upon responsible countries in the world to send a clear message that any type of aggression is unacceptable wherever it happens."

Asked whether that meant an explicit U.S. aim to defend Taiwan against an invasion, Sullivan concluded: "Our official government policy is that we're going to take every step we possibly can to ensure that never happens."

The State Department and Taiwan's Foreign Ministry didn't respond to Newsweek's request for comment before publication.
winnie will learn from puki...

Special Ops not invasion
 

Retrohelix

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Rubbish. US won't even commit troops to fight Russia or defend Ukraine. And Ukrainians are blue eyed blond haired ang mor.

They will commit troops to defend Taiwanese from Chinese? Can those ang mors tell who is who?

The only thing US do is sell weapons to Taiwan and encourage Chinese people to wipe each other out. That would make them happy to no end. 唯恐天下不乱
 

archon75@

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Beijing has given the strongest hint yet that it would reject attempts to categorize a future attack on Taiwan as an "invasion," after a government official suggested the term wouldn't apply to another "part of China."

The Chinese government in Beijing, established after the Chinese Civil War in 1949, has never governed Taiwan, whose president, Tsai Ing-wen, describes the island democracy as a "functionally independent" country, albeit one with limited recognition by a handful of U.N. member states.

China's ambition to annex the island is stifled only by Taiwanese will to resist and continued security assistance from the United States, which has remained Taiwan's strongest international backer for decades despite switching formal diplomatic recognition from Taipei to Beijing in 1979.

china-says-taiwan-attack-wouldnt-invasion.webp

Secretary of State Antony Blinken attends a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on April 26, 2022. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin protested Blinken’s remarks in an April 27 press conference after senior American diplomat said the U.S. would ensure Taiwan had “all necessary mean†to defend itself against aggression by China.AL DRAGO/POOL/GETTY IMAGES

During a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Tuesday, lawmakers pressed Secretary of State Antony Blinken for assurances that the administration of President Joe Biden would help sustain this long-standing "status quo" across the Taiwan Strait, primarily through the transfer of arms and training.

"We are determined to make sure that [Taiwan] has all the necessary means to defend itself against any potential aggression, including unilateral action by China to disrupt the status quo that's been in place now for many decades," Blinken said.

On Wednesday, Wang Wenbin, a spokesperson for the Chinese Foreign Ministry, voiced opposition to Blinken's comments. He suggested they were inconsistent with the U.S.'s "one China" policy, which recognizes the legitimacy of Beijing's governance over mainland China, but only acknowledges its claim to Taiwan.

Officially, the U.S. considers the status of Taiwan, a Japanese colony from 1895 to 1945, to be undetermined under international law. As such, it takes no position on sovereignty over the island. In 2021, after a summit with Chinese leader Xi Jinping, Biden appeared to endorse Taiwanese self-determination, saying: "Let them make up their mind."

"Since Taiwan is a part of China, how can the mainland 'invade' Taiwan?" Wang said, according to a Chinese-language transcript of his remarks. Incidentally, Beijing hasn't publicly called Russia's war against Ukraine an "invasion" either.

An English version on the Foreign Ministry's website included an additional line not said by the official: "The U.S. admits that Taiwan is part of China, but keeps talking about the mainland's potential 'aggression' of Taiwan. Isn't this self-contradictory since a country cannot 'invade' part of its own territory?"

Despite what appears to be a clear disagreement between Beijing and Washington in interpreting the status quo, Wang accused the U.S. of "reneging" on its commitments. It would push Taiwan into "dangerous waters" and lead to "unbearable cost" for America, too, he said.

china-says-taiwan-attack-wouldnt-invasion.webp

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin attends a regular press briefing in Beijing on November 9, 2020. Wang suggested at a press conference on April 27, 2022, that China would reject attempts to classify a future attack on Taiwan as an “invasion,†as it considers the island part of its territory.GREG BAKER/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

The U.S. has stepped up efforts to help Taiwan bolster its self-defense, but it hasn't publicly committed to come to its defense in the event of a Chinese attack. Under the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979, successive American administrations have supplied Taiwan with defensive weapons, but all have stopped short of an ironclad guarantee of direct military support—a deliberate policy of "strategic ambiguity" that keeps both sides guessing.

Taiwan's fate has been the subject of renewed attention in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. While Taiwanese officials don't believe an attack is imminent, they do see an alarming buildup of Chinese capabilities, and are trying to instill a sense of urgency in Taiwan's public.

When asked the perennial question about a hypothetical response to a future move on the island, senior U.S. officials have instead pointed to the need to increase deterrence in the Taiwan Strait by raising awareness among America's key allies.

"Certainly, we have expressed our concerns about China taking efforts to unilaterally change the status quo, and we think they are carefully looking at what's happening in Ukraine to learn lessons writ large, including with respect to Taiwan," Jake Sullivan, the president's national security adviser, told The Economic Club earlier this month.

He continued: "Now for the U.S. ourselves, the situation with Ukraine and the situation with Taiwan are not the same. Our relationship with Taiwan is governed by the Taiwan Relations Act; our security partnership is governed by the Taiwan Relations Act.

"One of the things that we have focused on in the past several weeks is actually deep consultations with allies and partners, including in Europe, to say: 'This kind of thing can happen in Europe; this kind of thing can also happen in the Indo-Pacific.'

"It's incumbent upon responsible countries in the world to send a clear message that any type of aggression is unacceptable wherever it happens."

Asked whether that meant an explicit U.S. aim to defend Taiwan against an invasion, Sullivan concluded: "Our official government policy is that we're going to take every step we possibly can to ensure that never happens."

The State Department and Taiwan's Foreign Ministry didn't respond to Newsweek's request for comment before publication.
Call police catch thieves operation?
 

BlackWing1977

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I can only say... attacking Taiwan is more harder than Russia attacking Ukraine... because got straits of Taiwan in between.. unless they only seek to destroy everything with missiles... and Taiwan probably got one of the highest concentration of Anti-Air missiles to land ratio in the world... since they always feel threatened...
 

croc1977

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can taiwan xmm escape for being lape by tiong?

UKR still got poland and other surround them ...

taiwan is sea leh
 

TheLookingGlass

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Rubbish. US won't even commit troops to fight Russia or defend Ukraine. And Ukrainians are blue eyed blond haired ang mor.

They will commit troops to defend Taiwanese from Chinese? Can those ang mors tell who is who?

The only thing US do is sell weapons to Taiwan and encourage Chinese people to wipe each other out. That would make them happy to no end. 唯恐天下不乱
People like you always try to play the race card. But ignore the fact that china in reality is despised by many predominantly Chinese nations in Asia.
 

Atilas

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Selling all my investments nao and buy a lot of popcorns. :s12:
 

RadEoNic

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It’s called peacekeeping mission nowadays
 

Krabs.

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learn well from their ally Russia

🀄 :o (y)
 

Philipkee

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People like you always try to play the race card. But ignore the fact that china in reality is despised by many predominantly Chinese nations in Asia.
No. I don't think China is despised by nations in Asia, Chinese or not. But it's also not worshipped by them.

My vibe is it's just caution but good place to do business. Like business partners and not friends. Unless you consider Hong Kong and Taiwan as natons but they are not.

There is some tension due to border disputes but it's all there is. Tension and caution. Despise would mean China Chinese are looked down on. They are not.. whether it is because of the money or not is another issue.
 
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