Manchester United - Theatre of Dreams - Part 35

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ItsmeagainhK

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Midfield is in shambles. When your best player is having doubts and have cast his eyes somewhere, no replacement for Fellaini & Herrera, Scott Mctominay & Andreas still very much unproven, Fred is ??? , you know that even Leicester City and Wolves midfield are stronger.

Can we do a deal for Bruno Fernandes ? I highly doubt so. Good luck to us this season.
 

YorYor

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What shambles? Our midfield may not be outstanding but it's decent. ScottM is playing like he's been in the side for years. AndreasP will get better with more game time, that I'm also quite certain. His decision-making is not the best right now, but that will come with more experience.
Fred excelled in certain games last season, and hopefully the coaches find the right role for him. My only gripe with him is his passing. For a midfielder, it is what I consider below average.
And a excellent reader/passer JuanM.

This is already so much better than the days of SAF trying to build up TomCleverley.
 

grynove

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theres a long article about ole at theathletic. quite interesting. i think chengsun can copy it ?
 

Shinji Kagawa

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not worse? im sure its not rock bottom yet lol

I cant recall much of him really ... Maybe cause I didnt watch the PSG game.

At least Sanchez has the Newcastle winner and memorable piano performances. :s13:
 

chengsun

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theres a long article about ole at theathletic. quite interesting. i think chengsun can copy it ?

This?

"Almost as soon as last season finished the whispers around how much it would cost to sign Harry Maguire from Leicester City began. Word came from the very top at the King Power Stadium that respected agents’ valuations of £65 million were misguided.

Aiyawatt Srivaddhanaprabha, known as Top, saw Maguire as a statement transfer and let it be known that only a world-record fee for a defender would be palatable. Sources have told The Athletic that Leicester’s owner initially wanted £100 million for Maguire. The message was clear to interested parties, including Manchester United and Manchester City: Leicester had a strong hand and would not fold.

This left United’s executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward with a dilemma. Ole Gunnar Solskjaer had made it abundantly clear Maguire was his top target to elevate a mediocre defence, not only for his capabilities on the pitch but his presence off it. England and Leicester staff reported a grounded figure who possessed leadership qualities, the type of character United needed. Solskjaer also wanted business done early, so new signings could acclimatise to the club and his style of play during pre-season.

But Woodward felt he could not afford to simply pay up. It is understood he was conscious of the precedent that might set for negotiations on other recruits. He knew, however, that given City’s interest he had to make the first move early. So in late May he called the Leicester chief executive Susan Whelan.

Usually, Jon Rudkin, Leicester’s sporting director, would handle the negotiations but Woodward has developed an excellent professional relationship with Whelan through the Premier League summits that all club powerbrokers attend. Whelan would also be the one to host visiting directors in the Leicester boardroom, with Top’s father Vichai preferring to stay out of the way in his personal room adjacent. She struck up good rapports. A source says: “She is very welcoming, but also shrewd, organised, quick and intelligent.”

It is said that following Vichai’s death last October, Whelan, who is also on the board at King Power and frequently flies to Thailand, has increased her input on football matters, as a trusted aid for Top following a 20-year working relationship.

So Woodward picked up the phone, knowing Whelan’s influence.

That initial conversation gave United a clear picture of the actual figure required to get Maguire: £80 million to edge the £75 million that Liverpool paid Southampton for Virgil van Dijk in January 2018. Sources say the tone of that first talk also left Leicester with the distinct impression a deal would be done.

City, meanwhile, took a softer approach. Pep Guardiola wanted Maguire to replace Vincent Kompany and even approached the England defender on the pitch after City’s 1-0 win in the penultimate game of the campaign, expressing his admiration for his performance. Maguire was said to favour moving to the Etihad at this stage.

But City were aware of Leicester’s demands and kept their counsel. By the middle of June the word in agent circles was that Leicester had proposed a fee of £90 million, a figure City sources stressed they would never get near. City board members also had recent experience of Leicester’s approach to selling players, having needed two windows to sign Riyad Mahrez for a club-record £60 million the year before, even if City were ultimately happy with the deal.

City offered Nicolas Otamendi, whose wages were prohibitive, and Eliaquim Mangala, who Leicester had no interest in. Their indecision was such that at one stage they asked agents of other centre halves for their opinion of Maguire’s abilities. In the end they made a bid worth up to £70 million for the 26-year-old, but by July their pursuit had in effect been called off. United’s strong interest meant Leicester had absolutely no reason to lower their expectations on price.

Guardiola said of Maguire on Sunday: “(A) top-class player. We were interested but we could not afford it. United could afford it. Congratulations to United on this signing.”

The reason for United’s myopia was multi-faceted. Firstly, there was Sir Alex Ferguson. He had spotted Maguire’s potential at 17 after the 2011 FA Youth Cup final. Maguire played for Sheffield United against a side including Paul Pogba at Old Trafford but suffered a concussion that kept him in a Manchester hospital overnight. A few days later, Maguire received a call from a withheld number. It was Ferguson, who inquired about his health and told him that through hard work he could play at the top level.

Fast forward to the summer of 2018 and United were trying to take Maguire to that level after his displays for England at the World Cup in Russia. Former manager Jose Mourinho made his feelings clear, but his interest came too late for the club to make a proper bid.

This year, however, Maguire had a ringing endorsement from a member of United’s new management team. As Hull manager Mike Phelan gave Maguire his first Premier League start in October 2016, and found a player with an appetite to learn.

Maguire would often take residence in video suites studying clips of his performances and also asked about the defenders such as Rio Ferdinand and Nemanja Vidic, with whom Phelan had worked during his first spell at United. He took a particular interest in data from the GPS system, which tracks the distance a player covers.

Speaking last summer, Phelan said: “Harry was one who now and again wanted to know: ‘How did so-and-so deal with that? Why would I need to be in this type of position at this moment?’ It’s an education when making that jump. It was learning skills which weren’t his strength. When to stand still, when not to dribble out. He understood that.”

When Phelan left Old Trafford and was asked by senior figures at the club if any players were worthy of joining United, he said Maguire. Andy Robertson, now at Liverpool, was another name mentioned.

Solskjaer was a firm advocate too, viewing Maguire as a leader for his team, and repeatedly pressed Woodward to complete the signing. While maintaining public diplomacy, sources say that behind the scenes, as the days turned into weeks, Solskjaer became increasingly persistent.

United made an initial bid of £70 million once the players reported back for pre-season on July 1, but Leicester rejected it. Woodward then waited.

A fortnight later in a meeting with the Leicester manager Brendan Rodgers, Maguire expressed his wish to leave should the club’s valuation be met. The Leicester manager gave in. Maguire would continue to maintain professionalism, refusing to resort to going AWOL as Mahrez had when trying to force his move to City. That respect ensured that strong relations with everyone at Leicester were upheld. He made a point of playing in the first pre-season friendly at Scunthorpe on July 16, despite feeling unwell the day before, and would go on to feature in four warm-up games for Leicester.

Top flew from Thailand to attend the match at Cambridge United on July 23 and reiterated his stance. There is a sense that after his father Vichai’s death last October he viewed this as a crucial, legacy-defining episode that would illustrate that the club’s ambition remains undimmed.

During that time Maguire’s agent Kenny Shepherd, son of former Newcastle owner Freddy, and his business partner Paul Stretford, who counts Wayne Rooney as his most famous client, worked hard to mediate an agreement between the clubs. United’s chief negotiator Matt Judge was also involved.

Still Woodward resisted, determined to lower the price. Leicester could now, though, point to the £50 million fee that United paid Crystal Palace for Aaron Wan-Bissaka as testimony for their own valuation of a player of far greater experience. Maguire had played more than 300 career games (98 in the Premier League), won 20 England caps, and starred at a World Cup. Wan-Bissaka, while prodigiously talented, had only really had one full season of first-team football under his belt.

United did look at Tottenham’s Toby Alderweireld, Kalidou Koulibaly, of Napoli, and Bournemouth defender Nathan Ake, but these players have been described as “flirtations”. Solskjaer was committed to Maguire.

Towards the end of July, as the impasse continued, Maguire was said to let his frustrations show. United were verbally approaching Leicester’s valuation but a compromise was not forthcoming. Sources say Maguire felt his dignified approach, plus a gentleman’s agreement when he signed his improved contract last summer that he could go for a reasonable price, warranted Leicester conceding some ground. The player was geared up for a move to Old Trafford by this point and it was clear how much United wanted him.

This “minor sulkiness” is said to have manifested in one or two leisurely sessions on the bike at Leicester’s Belvoir Drive training ground, The Athletic has been told. But nothing more. In Maguire’s final Leicester game at Stoke City on July 27, informed observers reported an off-key performance.

When Maguire called in sick on Monday July 29, suspicions were raised. While Rodgers did speak of an illness after the Stoke game it suited the 26-year-old, United and Leicester for him to miss that day’s broadcast media session and pre-season walkthroughs with Sky Sports. Awkward questions or out-of-sync video footage when Maguire was clearly on the move would not have helped anyone.

Last Thursday Maguire held talks with Rodgers and both agreed he would miss the following night’s friendly against Atalanta. The mood music was very much that Woodward was finally prepared to push the button.

The next morning came the decisive word: an £80 million fee up front. By Friday afternoon Rudkin was finalising the exact terms, taking into account the 15 per cent sell-on fee owed to Hull on the profit Leicester would make on their £15 million purchase in 2016. Personal terms on a five-year deal worth around £190,000 a week, more than double Maguire’s Leicester salary, were swiftly completed.

The contract is a huge sum and prompts a trickle-down effect. Burnley might now demand £50 million for James Tarkowski, a Leicester target, for instance.

But in terms of what United need, the money for Maguire could become irrelevant. He is a defender able to play the passing style that Solskjaer wants and brings a mentality for self-improvement, which should rub off on the younger players in the squad. A comparison can be made with Ferdinand, who cost £30 million from Leeds in 2002 and proved transformative for Ferguson.

Maguire certainly bore the look of a man content while driving out of Carrington after his medical on Sunday. He can ask former Leicester team-mates Danny Simpson and Kasper Schmeichel for advice on a place to live, with both former team-mates residents of Cheshire’s Golden Triangle, the affluent villages favoured by Manchester’s footballers.

There are those within the game, though, who feel the saga could have been wrapped up much sooner. United were aware of the trigger point and Rodgers was relaxed about Maguire’s departure from early on. But Woodward might well argue that United need to push back in such negotiations to limit the inflation that strikes whenever their name is part of the equation. After all, at least £80 million is not £100 million."
 

jahtl62

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Chelsea home then wolves away very tough start for us

Last season only get 1 point out of 6 points from these 2 games (draw with Chelsea & lost to Wolves). These 2 are must win games if you want to get into a strong start & do well for the season.
 

chengsun

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Guess you mean this.

There is a reason why those with understanding of the modern Manchester United believe Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has a tougher job on his hands than Jose Mourinho, Louis Van Gaal or David Moyes. Not only does he have a squad that requires surgery, but behind-the-scenes there have been even rudimentary problems to fix.

Take, for instance, the canteen at Carrington. When Solskjaer was appointed, the buffet service fed both players and staff, some 160 people. It provided a community feel, but had priorities skewed. Food would be ready and available for staff from midday but the footballers might not show up until 2pm after training. Essential fuel post-workout could be left under a lamp.

“The most important employees who need feeding are the athletes,” a source told The Athletic. “If you take it to the nth degree stuff such as spinach can lose nutrients over time. Without meaning to sound harsh, the accountant could bring in sandwiches.”

Solskjaer raised the matter, spoke with head chef Mike Donnelly and together they arranged for the introduction of a new fresh pasta station. It was opened this summer after the squad returned from the Far East tour, and means players can now order their chicken and tagliatelle as soon as they show up so they get the right food at the right time.

There was also an issue at weekends. Donnelly was only joined by one assistant for a short time, rather than a team of at least four Monday to Friday. The rationale was to mirror the smaller number of bodies in the building. But if a session overran, with Solskjaer wanting extra work on a particular drill ahead of a match, food already cooked would need to be kept heated. Donnelly has now been granted the flexibility to stay for longer hours to cook as and when required.

These may feel like minor gripes – salmon eaten slightly off ideal temperature was not why the team finished sixth – but stitched together with other concerns it formed a United tapestry in need of renovation. And it was long apparent Mourinho did not wish to perform the overhaul. Solskjaer, by contrast, could not want the job more, and it is this care and devotion that should imbue the coming campaign with hope, for all the justifiable reservation.

Quite clearly, desire alone does not qualify a person to manage Manchester United but it at least means all decisions will be taken for the good of the club, rather than the ego of an individual. That then engenders belief and belonging among players.

“I know Ole loves his job and is dedicated,” says Age Hareide, the Denmark manager who coached Solskjaer at Molde and Norway. “I am sure he will do well with Man United, there is no doubts about that for me.”

Those who know Cardiff might think differently, but Hareide’s conviction comes from those days back in 1994, when he first met a 21-year-old Solskjaer at Molde. They remain in contact and Hareide is thinking of attending Old Trafford for the opening fixture against Chelsea.

“As a young boy he was the most dedicated player I have come across,” Hareide tells The Athletic. “He started very early in taking notes on training sessions, writing down what he had done. He was very accurate in all his work and I think he has taken that with him into management.

“His philosophy is crystal clear, how he likes to play. He wants the individual player to get better and the team will then get better. And I know he is very sharp on details.”

Those at Carrington are aware of Solskjaer’s eye for minutiae. Another telling example is his expansion of offices for Mike Phelan and Michael Carrick, and the room housing the performance analysts, which is next to his. He wants to generate an atmosphere where football conversations flood the corridors outside his door and he regularly asks about GPS tracking data.

Indeed, those running statistics have been central to Solskjaer’s summer. He has made no secret of the importance of this pre-season for instilling his team with the fitness to play the high-intensity game he wants. It is why, ideally, he wanted all signings done early.

While on tour in the Far East, Solskjaer highlighted how his first match at Cardiff resulted in the second-highest pressing game in the Premier League last season. United ran five kilometres further than Neil Warnock’s team that day, having been outrun in 16 of their previous 17 top-flight fixtures under Mourinho.

Sources say Solskjaer knew the drastically raised output could not be sustained without triggering injuries but he persisted to chase Champions League qualification and the chance to land the job full-time. He is said to have told friends of this desire for the permanent position after three matches.

A sequence of 14 wins from 17 games justified his methods, even with the sight of Juan Mata, Jesse Lingard, and Ander Herrera all going off with muscle problems before half-time of the home draw with Liverpool. The drop-off of eight defeats in the final 12 games of last season may have alarmed those who thought Ed Woodward was too hasty in presenting Solskjaer with a three-year contract in March, but was also entirely predictable from the Norwegian’s perspective.

The sessions this summer have been designed to equip players’ bodies with the capacity to cover large distances for sustained periods, and at top speed when needed. The sports science team, led by Rich Hawkins, reported that element of training was up 50 per cent compared with last year’s pre-season. So, lots of running, but the majority has been with the ball and in tactical circumstances that replicate match situations.

Will Keane played under Solskjaer for United’s successful reserve team between 2008 and 2011. It was Solskjaer’s first taste of management, coming alongside Warren Joyce.

“Training was always tough,” Keane tells The Athletic. “Big volume in terms of distance, but all with the ball, possession games. You were having to put a shift in.

“Our teams growing up were technically gifted but we’d also be fitter and stronger than opponents. In a lot of games that would show in second halves when lads were fatigued and we could overpower them.”

Scientists have since christened it “tactical periodisation”, but training with purpose – so players can maintain levels into the 95th or 96th minutes of matches – is an ethos drawn from Ferguson. Jonathan Greening was at United between 1998 and 2001, a member of the Champions League final squad, and made his debut up front alongside Solskjaer in a League Cup tie against Bury. He makes sessions from that era sound like a blend of Rollerball and Mad Max.

“There were some big personalities,” Greening tells The Athletic. “We would have young v old games on a Friday, small-sided, half-pitch, and people would absolutely smash each other.

“I remember Roy Keane smashing a young lad called Mark Wilson once and Sir Alex Ferguson calling it a day, sending everyone in because it was carnage. You’re talking a day before a Premier League game. If you weren’t in a winning team people used to go nuts, pushing each other. Ole was one of them.”

Solskjaer has set the shoving aside as a manager but the demand for daily effort is still there. He, Carrick and Kieran McKenna devise and lead the sessions, with assistant manager Phelan, 56, watching on from the sides.

A source explains: “Phelan might say, ‘From my eye the tempo is not quick enough,’ or ‘he is too deep.’ Those little nuances.”

Solskjaer offers tactical sophistication on a personal basis. Marcus Rashford is profiting from the kind of advice the Norwegian provided Will Keane.

“He put a lot of sessions on for me and the young strikers, which were massively beneficial,” Keane, 26, says. “Certain movements – say the ball has gone wide, how to time your run into the box, or how to shrug off your defender.

“And he showed us different techniques for finishing. He is not one to say you should be lashing at the ball in front of goal. He would teach you finesse and composure. He said, ‘Make sure you’ve got your head up, have eye contact with the goalkeeper, you know where the goal is.’ Then it becomes split second, instinctive.”

As a striker who scored 28 United goals as a substitute, Solskjaer wants his players to maintain constant focus.

Keane adds: “He always said, ‘Even if you’re on the bench, make sure you’re switched on in terms of your vision.’ He had a technique. ‘If you look at one thing in the distance then glance to another, repeatedly, those little movements will keep your eyes alert for when you go on’.”

Solskjaer is applying a similar strategy on signings, scanning the bigger picture before entering the fray. He has been tapping into his contacts to establish targets are the right characters to shift a squad mentality that became fragmented under previous regimes.

Solskjaer first texted Ryan Giggs about Dan James six months ago and the former team-mates kept in regular contact thereafter. Aside from his frightening pace, Giggs noticed how James matured from the breakdown of his Leeds transfer and subsequently told Solskjaer he believed the winger was mentally ready to move to Old Trafford.

Giggs also passed along positive reports from Wayne Hennessey on Aaron Wan-Bissaka, while Gary Neville added information gathered from Ray Lewington, the Crystal Palace assistant. Neville worked with Lewington for England and knew the 62-year-old did not give compliments easily, so his praise of Wan-Bissaka carried weight.

Goalkeeping coach Richard Hartis fed information in too, asking Eric Steele’s opinion. Steele, who coached at United under Ferguson, had worked with Wan-Bissaka for England’s Under 20 side and spoke of an excellent player eager to learn.

Phelan has also been influential on recruitment. He managed Harry Maguire at Hull, so knows the hours the England defender spent studying video footage of his performances to find areas for improvement. The Leicester defender comes with a personal recommendation. Carrick, meanwhile, has used connections at Newcastle to build a picture of Sean Longstaff.

In his book, Leading, Ferguson extols the value of advice from confidantes. “I really believe in networks,” he writes. “Decisions are simpler when you are dealing with people you know well.”

United have not always applied full due diligence in recent transfer windows. By the time one person connected to the club found out that Alexis Sanchez was characterised as a loner at Arsenal, downright sullen at times, United had already made him their highest-earner on £500,000 a week.

Contacts at the Emirates were not then surprised to hear of similar reports of Sanchez’s behaviour once at Carrington. Ideally the Chilean would be gone but his wages act as a golden anchor.

“Ole needs to get certain players out,” says a friend. “He’s trying to change the culture, but that takes time. He wants to sign players who are on an upward trajectory.”

The trio through the door fit that brief but, given the anaemic nature of some displays last season, Solskjaer believes at least one more addition is needed in this window.

The Norwegian did not find success with signings at Cardiff. He bought 10 players the summer following relegation from the Premier League but was sacked eight months into his reign with Cardiff 17th in the Championship.

“You didn’t feel there was harmony in the dressing room,” says Danny Gabbidon, who played for Solskjaer then took over on caretaker terms. “It was a big squad and he added to it, although I’m not sure all the signings were his.

“It was hard for him to get a settled XI and momentum. But it wasn’t an easy job. I got a taste of just how difficult in my five games in charge. He actually recommended me to take over temporarily after being sacked, which showed his class.”

To emphasise that point, Cardiff chairman Mehmet Dalman, who appointed then dismissed Solskjaer, is still on very good terms with him. A high-ranking source says: “It was a crisis situation at Cardiff, it was always going to be an uphill struggle. His style of football needed a lot more investment and patience than he got.”

As Hareide says: “Sometimes when you come in as a coach you are completely unknown to the surroundings of the club. You maybe know if the players are good or bad but you can’t analyse the culture – who decides what. I think he knows that with Man United.”

That uncertainty is perhaps why Solskjaer was occasionally “within himself” after games at Cardiff, as Gabbidon describes, yet felt comfortable opening up at United reserves, where he coached Paul Pogba and Jesse Lingard.

Keane says: “He is very approachable but I witnessed a few times when he properly rollicked players if he thought we were a bit flat or needed a kick up the arse. He definitely had that change in tone where you knew he wasn’t messing around. This was when Pogba and Jesse were there. People respected him.”

Hareide adds: “Even when I was having words with him during some games he could bite back if he felt I was being unfair. That is good.”

When manager of Molde, on a smaller scale, that confidence and clarity of thought brought two league titles. Solskjaer needs time for the same methods to translate to the skyscraper of United but his personal history can act as an effective binding agent. His long-standing relationships with people around the club should not be underestimated.

He has known Pogba since nights together for United reserves under the floodlights of Altrincham’s Moss Lane stadium, and that shared experience has enabled him to take an extinguisher rather than gasoline to the flames of the Frenchman’s public desire to leave, even in the face of renewed efforts by Real Madrid —with a bid rejected last week.

Solskjaer knows he will need United’s most creative player — who contributed to 22 Premier League goals last season — and believes diplomacy will prove constructive. Multiple sources say Pogba is an excellent trainer. One with deep knowledge of the club added: “I think if he stays he would get his head down and try to prove himself. He has got that pride about him, even though a lot of people outside don’t think so.”

Solskjaer’s United roots reach elsewhere too. He bought Carrington receptionist Kath Phipps a bar of Norwegian chocolate on his first day and found a friend in Greening when getting reacquainted with MUTV.

“He was actually my first room-mate when we travelled away,” Greening says. “At 19 I was nervous as hell. He was so nice, calmed me down. He had the football on the TV. I let him have the remote of course!”

Greening now does co-commentary on Under 18 and Under 23 matches for MUTV and sees Solskjaer’s return as a catalyst for change. “Mourinho didn’t really interact with MUTV staff,” he says. “He’d come in and say, ‘How many questions are you asking me? Let’s get it over and done with.’ It is probably a chore for Ole too but, regardless, he is always smiling and full of positive energy.

“Ole could see what Sir Alex was like with all the staff at the training ground, the caterers, the cleaners, and he has brought that family atmosphere back.”

That may sound nostalgic in football’s era of brutal modernity but it undeniably helps create a culture of togetherness at a club. And besides, what else is the purpose of playing the game if not for enjoyment?

Winning is fun, of course, but there is a way to do it, on and off the pitch. United now have a manager in charge who understands that. Solskjaer stopped hearts in the Nou Camp 20 years ago. Just imagine the romance if he can resuscitate the club as boss.
 

chengsun

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theres a long article about ole at theathletic. quite interesting. i think chengsun can copy it ?

I did not subscribe though now got free trial for 30 days. happens to read them on reddit so share here.
 

grynove

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same la bro. yah the 2nd one. quite a good read. ole is different.
 

jahtl62

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I cant recall much of him really ... Maybe cause I didnt watch the PSG game.

At least Sanchez has the Newcastle winner and memorable piano performances. :s13:

Sanchez will play better if put him as a striker to partner Rashford or behind Rashford. Same goes for Martial. Sanchez & Martial are both able to play as strikers. Find another player for the left midfield.
 

Asakura

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maybe use spoiler den those on mobile dont need to scroll thru the wall of text? :o
 

Shinji Kagawa

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Sanchez will play better if put him as a striker to partner Rashford or behind Rashford. Same goes for Martial. Sanchez & Martial are both able to play as strikers. Find another player for the left midfield.

Daniel James lor. :)
 

cracker

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Every mgr is judged by the results ON the field....

Ah Moist was too naive upon his appointment...and was brutally exposed on and off the field.

Ah Gaal was brought in cos of what he did in Ajax almost 20 years ago plus winning with Bayern, Barcelona... Supposed to deal more with youths....but his philosophy turned some players into robot...

Ah Jose was brought in to bring back success after 3 years with Ah Moist & Gaal.... first season was a wet dream for many....domestic and a Europa title. 2nd year things started to fall apart...blame this and that.... third year...continue to blame this and that...only the football itself was spared from the blame.

Ole...first 10 games was wet dream again....after that everything went downhill... blame the players lack of fitness to maintain the high pressing....

Let's see how much pressing they will do wef this coming Sunday !!
 

beano

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WTF was that WOT.. i thought it was a autobiography....
 

spykid

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Nice read. I enjoyed reading it. Instead of those stupid tabloid news
 

astrayharry

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Hmm don’t see how Eriksen can cover Herrera departure... both totally different players. If Eriksen comes, mata sure has lesser play time or get shifted to flank. Mata is forever unlucky never get to play in his fav place
 

WhiteHunter

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Hmm don’t see how Eriksen can cover Herrera departure... both totally different players. If Eriksen comes, mata sure has lesser play time or get shifted to flank. Mata is forever unlucky never get to play in his fav place

mctominay is herrera cover. eriksen is number 10 position.
 

cracker

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I prefer Eriksen over Herrera...
The Spanish is like those hound dog snapping at opposition and I believe McT & Peirera are doing that right now which means he will always be running around the midfield area.

Eriksen is more like a creator or play maker which we had seen from time to time last few seasons...
 

spykid

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Eriksen > Dybala

But there’s only three days left and we are dealing with Daniel Levy who is a hard negotiator and doesn’t sell to PL clubs. But then he sold Kyle Walker to City. Can’t see it happening anyway

Angel Gomes stepping up!
 

WhiteHunter

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I prefer Eriksen over Herrera...
The Spanish is like those hound dog snapping at opposition and I believe McT & Peirera are doing that right now which means he will always be running around the midfield area.

Eriksen is more like a creator or play maker which we had seen from time to time last few seasons...

herrera is like number 6 or 8 while eriksen is number 10 behind striker.
 
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