[NAS] Synology NAS owner club!

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davidktw

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i super value...

hence...

918+ backup to another 918+
both connected to UPS.
both on RAID5 (prev on RAID6 when i was on DS1515+ & DX513)
with Hyper Backup + Versioning

Considered backup?

:o

Definitely :)

Just nitpicking (off-site too?) lolx
 

batniss

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Definitely :)

Just nitpicking (off-site too?) lolx

yeah, my other DS918+ is at my parents' place.

I use site to site VPN (hence why i love ASUS routers) to transfer the backup over. Once setup, everything transparent.

I have cloud storage too ~ but i rarely use it. Not that cheap i feel once your data reaches a certain "size" compared to traditional HDD.
 

davidktw

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yeah, my other DS918+ is at my parents' place.

I use site to site VPN (hence why i love ASUS routers) to transfer the backup over. Once setup, everything transparent.

I have cloud storage too ~ but i rarely use it. Not that cheap i feel once your data reaches a certain "size" compared to traditional HDD.

Good job! :)
 

karloil

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The list of compatible and tested hdd does not include some of the enterprise.

Oh they will work for sure. Enterprise HDDs are just made to be used more rigorously than consumer ones. They use the same sata and power plugs. I was actually considering the UltraStar HC310 before, but I decided going for the N300 instead.

Definitely. That's the whole point of even investing in a NAS in the first place isn't it. ?

Personally I don't scrimp on such stuffs because I have the technical know how to make machines work for me, and if I measure the cost of losing my data to an undetectable situation, I would have invested in a solution that give me a piece of mind. Enterprise or Consumer is totally beside the point, because the perspective of COST is different.

Also as another poster have suggested, switch on your documents versioning on your NAS if such a feature is available. HyperBackup also support backup versioning, so use it if you can.

However so, the ultimate decision is the owner of his/her data. If you value your data, you know what to do. If you think you are adequately protected, good for you. :) That's all I have to share.

On point! That's why spending a few more $ for a UPS is simply a no brainer. My most important files are using Hyperback on a Thumb Drive. :o And in the future, I will get another NAS for my offsite backup. Not really following the 3-2-1 principle, but it's close :D

In addition, I noticed that lightning has been more fierce lately - having that UPS/AVR is really a comforting thought. :)

I posted in here before about my experience, but I actually lost my data from a sudden power trip in my block during my early NAS days. Mine not even an old block, I think was around 8 years old.

Oh man, too bad :( My early NAS days I get to play around them at work - and the owner doesn't want to put UPS. The building the office was in have quarterly power shutdown activity. I already left the company. I wonder how they are doing now :s22:
 

Matrock5

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I see thanks for the explanation. actually as a matter of fact i have been doing such like copying over and over again on my external hdd last time so now i thought of venturing in NAS as my files get more, and having to access them remotely.

Of course it will, but will you bother to copy over again that 1000 photos, or you will realise 200 has completed, and you will just copy over the missing 800? Will you find out out of the 200 that went thru, you will check if all all intact? Remember harddisk have write caches, just because it is completely written recognised by the OS, doesn’t mean the data has been written into the platters. You have to check that you have configured your NAS to have no write cache for the harddisk and no write cache means your write speed will suffer. That is why hardware raid comes with optional battery packs to ensure best write speed and yet in the event of a server sudden failure, the unwritten cache in the hardware card will be sustained for normally up to 72hrs and can be written into the drives once the server start again. The UPS plays such a role for a consumer grade software raid solution.

UPS will be a reliable power source, because it plays the role of power surge prevention and also the role of switching into the battery should the mains failed. It is as if your NAS is working like a laptop with battery, however a laptop with battery is not protected from power surges. :)
 

davidktw

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I see thanks for the explanation. actually as a matter of fact i have been doing such like copying over and over again on my external hdd last time so now i thought of venturing in NAS as my files get more, and having to access them remotely.

As preamble to choosing between an external hard disk and a NAS solution, a NAS solution is generally more involved, because you will need to map external drives, you need to manage the array, you need to take care of network and so forth. That being said, most, if not all, of what a typical consumer required are easily achieved via a web console offered by typical consumer NAS solution.

A start for new consumer on Synology, I will recommend https://blog.synology.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-synology-2019/ as a starting point, then you can post ur queries in here for further clarification.
 

Matrock5

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Appreciate it. Will be making my purchase once I read up.

As preamble to choosing between an external hard disk and a NAS solution, a NAS solution is generally more involved, because you will need to map external drives, you need to manage the array, you need to take care of network and so forth. That being said, most, if not all, of what a typical consumer required are easily achieved via a web console offered by typical consumer NAS solution.

A start for new consumer on Synology, I will recommend https://blog.synology.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-synology-2019/ as a starting point, then you can post ur queries in here for further clarification.
 

stam

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anyone know how to Map Drive Remotely for my laptop?

so my laptop can access my NAS like a drive in explorer when outside with internet connection.

I can only map to my desktop at home.
 

batniss

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anyone know how to Map Drive Remotely for my laptop?

so my laptop can access my NAS like a drive in explorer when outside with internet connection.

I can only map to my desktop at home.

really wouldn't recommend that. Instead, why not DS File?
 
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davidktw

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anyone know how to Map Drive Remotely for my laptop?

so my laptop can access my NAS like a drive in explorer when outside with internet connection.

I can only map to my desktop at home.

Personally I don't recommend you expose your NAS file services to external network. Consider using a VPN, which can be offered by your router if it is supported, or port forward the VPN to your OpenVPN offered by Synology NAS. After which you will be able to access the file services using Internal IP address as if you are part to your network.

You may read up on https://www.synology.com/en-global/knowledgebase/DSM/help/VPNCenter/vpn_setup

With OpenVPN, you can configure split tunnel at your laptop, so that only your home internal IP addresses will be routed via the OpenVPN client installed on your laptop. Other traffic will continue via your default route depending on where you are, in office, or tethering 4G etc...

If however you wish to insist on public access to your fileserver, I will assume it is Windows via SMB/CIFS

Setup port forwardings TCP/445 and TCP/139 from your router to your Synology NAS IP.

You may need to also subscribe to a dynamic IP service, either on Synology https://www.synology.com/en-us/knowledgebase/DSM/help/DSM/AdminCenter/connection_ddns or on your router, after which you will be able to access your Synology from public Internet using the dynamic hostname
 
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stam

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really wouldn't recommend that. Instead, why not DS File?

was looking at easy access like a drive in the laptop. does DS file have app for laptop?

also i only want the laptop to be able to access 1 of the drive not the whole NAS.
 

stam

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Personally I don't recommend you expose your NAS file services to external network. Consider using a VPN, which can be offered by your router if it is supported, or port forward the VPN to your OpenVPN offered by Synology NAS. After which you will be able to access the file services using Internal IP address as if you are part to your network.

You may read up on https://www.synology.com/en-global/knowledgebase/DSM/help/VPNCenter/vpn_setup

With OpenVPN, you can configure split tunnel at your laptop, so that only your home internal IP addresses will be routed via the OpenVPN client installed on your laptop. Other traffic will continue via your default route depending on where you are, in office, or tethering 4G etc...

If however you wish to insist on public access to your fileserver, I will assume it is Windows via SMB/CIFS

Setup port forwardings TCP/445 and TCP/139 from your router to your Synology NAS IP.

You may need to also subscribe to a dynamic IP service, either on Synology https://www.synology.com/en-us/knowledgebase/DSM/help/DSM/AdminCenter/connection_ddns or on your router, after which you will be able to access your Synology from public Internet using the dynamic hostname

hmm..ok, seems like the security issues involved. those VPN stuffs are abit complicated for laymen like me. Maybe i just stick to access thru the quickconnect
 

davidktw

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hmm..ok, seems like the security issues involved. those VPN stuffs are abit complicated for laymen like me. Maybe i just stick to access thru the quickconnect

I might be mistaken, but quickconnect won’t let you mount a drive because the technique used to establish a network route is what we called reverse tunnelling. Your NAS will connect to a service provided by Synology and create a reverse tunnel or using HTTP tunnelling access the NAS. Likewise on your laptop or mobile drive you connect to Synology to link up the connection. Because network hop is indirect and also I am not sure myself where that server is hosted, your routing could be going all the way to Taiwan or US, then back to Singapore (assuming you are in Singapore)

This method is also limited to several applications developed by Synology, which also include logging into your NAS web console. But I doubt you can perform a drive mapping from your OS.

Why not you try those tutorials and see if you can get openvpn working? At least a trial, it wouldn’t hurt if you can’t get it working, which you can just stop the VPN server in your NAS :)
 

stam

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I might be mistaken, but quickconnect won’t let you mount a drive because the technique used to establish a network route is what we called reverse tunnelling. Your NAS will connect to a service provided by Synology and create a reverse tunnel or using HTTP tunnelling access the NAS. Likewise on your laptop or mobile drive you connect to Synology to link up the connection. Because network hop is indirect and also I am not sure myself where that server is hosted, your routing could be going all the way to Taiwan or US, then back to Singapore (assuming you are in Singapore)

This method is also limited to several applications developed by Synology, which also include logging into your NAS web console. But I doubt you can perform a drive mapping from your OS.

Why not you try those tutorials and see if you can get openvpn working? At least a trial, it wouldn’t hurt if you can’t get it working, which you can just stop the VPN server in your NAS :)

yes, quickconnect not a good way compare to mounting the drive to my computer, i can open the files and copy, paste etc easily.

let me read up on openvpn and see how to go about it.

Thanks for your advice.
 

fluid_motion

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I never got openvpn to work, so just used web station to access disk station portal. Not really secure but does the job.
 

naked123

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or install openvpn server on another pc/server

and use

push "route 192.168.X.X 255.255.255.0"

change 192.168.X.X to your IP
 

batniss

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or install openvpn server on another pc/server

and use

push "route 192.168.X.X 255.255.255.0"

change 192.168.X.X to your IP

Good routers such as asus can do it. Save $ on servers. Since router usually most people will just let it run indefinitely. Best choice
 

davidktw

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yes, quickconnect not a good way compare to mounting the drive to my computer, i can open the files and copy, paste etc easily.

let me read up on openvpn and see how to go about it.

Thanks for your advice.

https://www.synology.com/en-global/knowledgebase/DSM/help/VPNCenter/vpn_setup

On your router, setup port forwarding for PUBLIC 1194/UDP to your NAS internal IP
 

007Mi6

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Oh they will work for sure. Enterprise HDDs are just made to be used more rigorously than consumer ones. They use the same sata and power plugs. I was actually considering the UltraStar HC310 before, but I decided going for the N300 instead.

I am now looking at DS918+ but DS920+ has just been announced and coming soon. Worth to buy DS918+ now at $719?
 

karloil

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I am now looking at DS918+ but DS920+ has just been announced and coming soon. Worth to buy DS918+ now at $719?

Yes, the 920+ was announced a few days after I got the 918+. But for me, I will still stick with the 918+ as the 'update' is quite incremental only.

In my take, do you need the NAS now? Then go for the 918+. The 918+ can do the same things that the 920+ can. You can already play around with it, arrange your files and enjoy exploring what a NAS can do. Plus, the 918+ has been around for 2+ years now and is a great seller, so you know it's well proven hardware.

But if you can still wait and take your time (and you want the latest), by all means go for the 920+. Pricing will definitely be higher and you might wait until maybe a few more months in order for it to arrive in Singapore.

A third option is for you to wait for the 920+ arrival (If you can still wait). Compare the prices of the 2, then decide then. Maybe the price difference of the 920+ vs 918+ may allow you to get an additional Ram for the 918+, bigger HDDs or get SSDs.

Where did you find $719 for the 918+? The cheapest I know is $750.

I enjoyed my time in researching which hardware to purchase before I got my 918+. Hope you get to enjoy your time too! Always be here to give you opinions.
 
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